Supply Chain Blog

Improve Manufacturing Performance with Total Productive Maintenance

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Aug 23, 2018

When I first came across Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) I was sceptical of yet another ”blue sky” approach to pursuing manufacturing excellence. Surely, this would soon be replaced by the next set of buzz-word initials dreamed up by sharp-suited consultants. But no; I saw the light and now I’m a firm believer in this technique that originated in Japan.

If you have a factory that is running below par in terms of efficiency, output, reliability or cost etc, then TPM could be the ideal tool to achieve a sustainable turnaround. Companies do not like under-performing factories and there is usually somewhere else they could make their products better, faster or cheaper. So, if your factory is under threat of closure you might consider following the TPM principles.

TPM is not rocket science but it requires just as much senior management buy-in and patience as an S&OP process demands. There are multiples levels of TPM success but even the basics will require a significant and sustainable change in behaviour. Kick off with the Kaizen 5S approach which is remarkably simple stuff.

Total Productive MaintenanceKaizen 5S is based on the translation of 5 Japanese words relating to systematic improvement and maintenance of a clean, efficient, well organised operation.

  1. Sort – Sort out what you really need – I mean really need! Throw out anything that has been hanging around for a few years “just in case”. Check out your spare parts store and see what items are held for equipment you no longer own!
  2. Straighten – Have you ever mislaid your car keys? This system creates a dedicated space for every tool or spare part located near to where it is needed and you can clearly see when it is missing!
  3. Scrub – Clean the machines and the production area thoroughly. Dust can affect quality, spills can be hazardous and well maintained equipment lasts longer.
  4. Standardise - If you use identical working practices for maintenance and cleaning your employees will become highly proficient. Standardisation provides you with a flexible workforce that can be deployed where needed and without a training period.
  5. Sustain – From the factory manager to the tea boy you must keep the faith and sustain every initiative. This is very difficult at first but you have to grit your teeth and keep going.

Of course, this is merely a snap-shot of what TPM entails but it shows you the basic elements you need to start the journey. As mentioned, the first tentative steps can be painful but if you stay the course the benefits are immense in efficiency and employee satisfaction. The principles apply equally to logistic centres, offices; essentially everywhere people work.

Oh, but don’t try this at home or a divorce is highly probable, believe me!

Image credit: corbindavenport.blogspot.co.uk

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Manufacturing Footprint, Supply Chain, S&OP, Cost Reduction

10 Top Tips to Successful Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A) Integration

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Aug 15, 2018

The ink is dry on the deal, the celebratory corks have been popped and the sharp-suited lawyers have gone off to bank a small fortune. The projected negotiations to thrash out a deal to buy or merge with another company are finally over. Relief all around, smiley faces, back slapping; cigars; done and dusted! Although through-the-night negotiations on a diet of poor coffee and poorer cigarettes are not easy, integrating the two or more entities will be substantially harder and a potential minefield.

M&AsConsiderable time, effort and cash are expended in calculating the business case of M&A activity before completion of a deal. Elaborately crafted press releases tell the world about the benefits the new relationship will deliver. However, very few people involved up to this stage in the process will actually be accountable for future success or more likely, failure.

Whether your M&A is a local, regional, national or global event here are 10 top tips to getting as close to the glossy press release promises as possible.

  1. Team. Appoint a team to lead the change and ensure there is a Change Manager in the team with deep and recent experience in the field. The overall project must be led by someone of suitable seniority in order to make an easily accessible two-way bridge between junior and senior groups. Don’t select the team members from one entity only!
  2. Objectives. Make your intentions and targets clear and get buy-in from all parties and particularly the acquired team. If you genuinely make everyone feel part of the process you will have greater success in implementing difficult decisions later on and for sure these will come!
  3. Assets. If offices and factories are involved and your intention is to centralise/ harmonise you need to approach this delicately. The “bought company” will always assume their workplace is most at risk so all evaluations have to be transparent and honest and impartial 3rd party expert help is advised.
  4. Culture.  There will inevitably be differences in company culture but if both sides can accommodate modification towards a new halfway-house then that can be a win-win but it is extremely difficult to achieve. If culture is forced on one group or another then you are likely to fail.
  5. Rumour Control. Have you ever heard a good news rumour about someone? Most rumours are negative or critical or someone or something and they will plague M&A integrations. If you get your communication policy in order and people feel free to raise concerns then damaging coffee machine whispering can be nipped in the bud.        
  6. Communicate, communicate, oh and communicate. M&A integration worries people and worried people are not as efficient and diligent as they should. Invest in a website and/or newsletter that very clearly keeps people informed on progress and next steps. Keep them fully involved with Q&A sessions and proactively sought feedback.
  7. Keep the business going! Sounds obvious but getting distracted by integration ups and downs can severely damage your business. You must keep close control on maintaining good practice in all integrating businesses.
  8. Complexity Reduction. If the businesses have similar SKU ranges then take the opportunity to understand where there are clear overlaps and where an SKU cull can free up human and cash resources.
  9. Constantly review. Integration is a real moving feast! Assumptions will change and plans may have to be modified and these should be embraced rather than receive critical attention. Do not be afraid to revisit the objectives and plans frequently and modify as prudent.
  10. Celebrate. When significant milestones are achieved be sure to get the cakes and champers out. Reassure people that the journey is progressing well and particularity those not directly involved in the process as they will feel the most pressure on job security.

When you consider the amount of time and money that went into securing the M&A deal a generous budget for integration will pay back extremely quickly. A degree of early planning and preparation on the actual integration will see you reach the press release objectives – if anyone ever checks!

 

Tags: FMCG, Mergers & Acquisitions, Dave Jordan, CEO, CEE, Cost Reduction

FMCG cost savings versus sales & marketing budgets!

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Aug 13, 2018

There is your dilemma. You need to save cash towards an expensive year-end holiday but you really do not know the best place from where to take the money. Do you take it from your day to day current account which is already set up to pay the routine monthly bills and invoices? Do you take funds out of an investment account that has not yet actually matured?

In effect, the money in the current account is already committed and the expected appreciation in the investment account is still to be delivered which puts me on my soap box for today’s topic.

When times are tough and cost savings are required why do the senior bods always look to Supply Chain in the first instance? Unlike those colleagues with a fondness for endless agency lunches there is very little discretionary spend to be found in the vast majority of Supply Chain operations. OK, there may be some team building budget, business travel and a small entertainment allowance but where else can you save money?

There is not a lot you can do to have an impact in the short term. What could you do?

1. Negotiate better RM/PM prices? Yes, but this will not filter through to the bottom line very quickly.

2. Increase efficiency in your factories? Yes, but again not likely to hit the balance sheet any time soon.

3. Reduce head count along the Supply Chain? Certainly effective but think about notice periods and compensation obligations and not least the effect on efficiency and reliability.

FMCG Pharma cost savings supply chain resized 600You will have contracts in place for most services with 3 or 4PLPs for warehousing but as long as pallet space utlisation, storage efficiency and shrinkage etc is under control there really are few opportunities and certainly no “low hanging fruit”.

People often rant on about how sales and marketing people are the real stars of any FMCG or Pharma show and without them nothing happens. Think about it, if you do not have any product available to sell it does not matter if you have the best sales pitch or the most memorable TV advert, does it? In simple terms the SC gets the stuff there and S&M might, repeat might, sell it!

Supply Chain people and processes get the product into Traditional Trade and Key Account outlets and how they do it is relatively inflexible in terms of discretionary spend along the way. So when you are looking for savings why do you assume they must come from Supply Chain and not from the huge sales and marketing budgets? The promised client discounts have not yet delivered and the proposed new TV advert is a long way from having an in-market impact.

Certainly, you have to keep control of costs and a rolling annual target is a sensible plan for any business but 2-3% Supply Chain reduction every year is commonly small beer compared with multi-million S&M expenses. Diverting your valuable Supply Chain resources to scrimp and save these small percentages simply takes people off the day to day priority of getting your SKUs onto shelves.

Those Supply Chain “savings” may not actually be money in the bank.

Image courtesy of cooldesign at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, CEO, Pharma, Supply Chain, Traditional Trade, Cost Reduction

FMCG & Pharma: Top 10 Tips for a Tip Top Supply Chain

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Jul 16, 2018

Only a few months into the year and I am hearing the same old complaints about the economy and business being in general ill health. However, there is a new recurring theme which popped up at various parties and gatherings over Easter; “my company doesn't seem to do anything different and just hopes business will improve”. Not going to happen, no way!

FMCG_PHARMA_SUPPLY_CHAIN_TIPSCertainly learning by your mistakes is a powerful message but banging your head against a brick wall for a number years is a rather pointless and painful experience and reflects dire leadership. Those companies that identify failings and shortcomings in their supply chain AND do something about them will be best prepared to beat the competition.

Based on client feedback and impact analysis of “before and after” performance I list our top 10 tips to tip top Supply Chain performance. 

  1. Route To Market – Has the march of the International Key Accounts stalled? Traditional Trade Distributors may still be a large chunk of your business and they are capable of scratching out growth but only if you support them. Give your RTM a thorough service and your Distributors will serve you better.
  2. Sales & Operational Planning - If this is in place and working well, great but there is no doubt you could improve it. If there is no S&OP you should use it! If you are not yet a believer of S&OP check out “What has S&OP ever done for us?".
  3. Reduced Inventory – Why not give your sales a boost with some unexpected and low cost support using stock that will be otherwise written off? I detect numerous companies “encouraged” stock into the trade for year end and only the residual stock disposal companies will benefit if stock gets too close to expiry.
  4. SKU Complexity – When did you last study your complexity? Do you have any idea what complexity is doing to your business? Understand your sku complexity and check if it appropriate for your business.
  5. Improved Customer Service – A number of major global companies still do not measure CS to any degree of accuracy or honesty.  Companies that fool themselves on Customer Service rarely succeed.
  6. Proactive 3PLP’s – Are they meeting the agreed KPI’s? If they are then perhaps you need to review them and revise targets upwards, again and again.
  7. Sales & Marketing Buy-in – This is still a problem, I fear. If only everyone in your company was aligned to the same volume/value plan and 100% mutually supportive. Think what sort of competitive edge that would provide.
  8. Use the ERP - Avoid uncontrolled spreadsheets like the plague! They undermine your business and waste time and effort. If you are considering a fresh implementation of an ERP then chose a partner with experience in the field. I mean real operational experience and not bought-in fresh out of university, suited “experts”.
  9. Continuously Improve – If you are in the same position in 12 months time then you will be dropping towards the back of the pack and will be ill equipped to compete. Keep innovating and improving your Supply Chain.
  10. Supply Chain Awareness – A very important tip top number 10. There is more to supply chain than trucks and sheds - for the uninitiated this is what Supply Chain is all about.

Check out the top 5 as a priority and then seek an expert partner to lead you through the process of change in the next 5. Don’t be in the same position this time next year; do something!

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Route to Market, Logistics Service Provider, Dave Jordan, CEO, Performance Improvement, Pharma, KPI, Traditional Trade, S&OP, Cost Reduction

FMCG Cost Control: Boosting Brewing Bottom Lines

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Sep 19, 2017

Picture the scene in many a brewing boardroom; a terse note has arrived from the suits at HQ telling the boss to urgently reduce costs as the year-end result is not going to look pretty. Why do all the board directors then look silently at their supply chain colleague? Of course, there are significant costs associated with a modern supply chain but you cannot make significant savings from that infrastructure overnight.  Supply chain budgets very rarely contain significant discretionary spend unlike the bank busting sums in the pockets of sales and marketing!

BREWING_COST_SAVINGS_BOTTOM_LINE_FMCG.jpgAs is usually the case, let us assume the SC team is constantly looking at ways to reduce cost in factories, logistics networks, 3PLPs, planning etc. What other costs could be challenged without causing discontinuity and unnecessary stress in the company?  The SC usually leads any cost efficiency projects which I think is fair enough as the discipline is most familiar with cost control and challenge.

Here are 5 areas I feel are always worthy of visiting when looking for "low-hanging fruit" bottom line benefits.   

  1. Old promotions, soon to expire stock, old artwork/label stock, slow movers. All companies (particularly FMCG) will have some or all of this and for various reasons - some good, some not so good. If you do not routinely address this you will be hit with an unexpected loss at year end or at the next stock count. Bring the list to the board meeting and hold accountable the actual people responsible for creating the stock in the first place. Sell it out and stop paying for storage too!
  2. Promotional activity. Is it all really necessary and does it actually pay back? Do you know how much of that original pristine packaging assembled in the factory is destroyed in the name of the latest promotional whim? Plastic film, outer cases and trays litter the floors of repacking operations everywhere. You have paid for that original packaging and now you are paying someone to destroy that and replace it with fresh material. Just think of all those Dollars/Euros that could be spent in a much more customer focussed way or simply saved? When you consider all the extra labour, logistics and packaging material just how much value is really generated for your business?

  3. How many SKUs do you need? Do you know how many your business has when you include all the promos and specials? Every single SKU costs money to source, transport, plan, store and deliver. Plus, the more you have the more likely you will generate the problem discussed in point 1 above. Analyse your current portfolio and see what is really driving value in your company. Conversely, see what is sucking value out of the business at the other end of the scale. Every extra low value SKU clogs up the wheels of your Sales & Operational Planning (S&OP) process.

  4. Telephones and internet. Always a difficult area as it can be perceived to be petty but it is usually an uncontrolled drain on cash. If you have provided staff with internet access on laptops or tablets or telephones you can be sure you are funding personal surfing time. Unless free telephone calls are part of the remuneration package why should the employee not pay for them? In my experience, significant cash can be saved through just a little prudence in this area. Do you leave your telephone network open at night with unlimited international dialling access? Also, the next time you see 2 people in the same office talking to each other on company mobile phones.......

  5. Discretionary spend. Don't make it discretionary! If budgets exist for team building and entertainment you can bet your life those funds will be used. Do you really need to "team build" every year? These occasions tend to be considered as a perk of the job and I am not convinced of their value when they happen so often. If team building sessions are to go then you should ensure this applies to all departments. Letting the marketing team building slip through will simply demotivate the rest of the company.

Achieving visible buy-in at the top table which is cascaded to teams will generate the best initiatives and ensure alignment. Paying consistent attention to these and other cost areas might save you from the ultimate saving of issuing redundancy notices including possibly, your own!

Image courtesy of Pixomar at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Brewing & Beverages, FMCG, Dave Jordan, Forecasting & Demand Planning, Cost Reduction

FMCG Turn-around Intensive Care Recovery KPIs

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Sep 06, 2017

On a daily basis the amount of care we give to the human body is remarkably little. When you are feeling in good shape the best the body can hope for is a good wash, a brush of the teeth and a slap of moisturiser if you are a bit of a girly. What else? Haircut and manicure perhaps oh, and possibly a check that your weight has not dropped that desired 10% overnight.

Considering the complexity of the human body and how we cannot live without it we do not spend too much time analysing how it is performing. We probably spend more attention on our cars and IT gadgets. Why is my PC running so slow? The car is overheating, I must check this now. Such symptoms are immediately of prime importance and top of mind and must be addressed now!

This all changes when we are feeling unwell. Suddenly we are taking our temperature, blood pressure and pulse rate. Blood tests may be needed. You may be wired up to monitor to see how the heart or brain is functioning. The body is now getting the intensive care it needs in hospital. Recording and monitoring this raft of data is the route to a hopefully full and speedy recovery.

FMCG_RECOVERY_SUPPLY_CHAIN_KPIS.jpgIf your business is operating well and there is even some growth in these testing times then the usual keep fit-heart monitoring Balanced Scorecard KPIs are reported weekly or monthly. The focus is usually on getting your stuff to customers and onto shelves at the right time, in the correct quantity and at the lowest cost. Along with other company measures, e.g. finance, HR, SHEQA, the scorecard shows the health of the business.

When all is not going smoothly however, the Balanced Scorecard may need supplementing with other measures. In companies where sales are below expectations and cash flow has dried up you need intensive care focus in that area. This does not mean you stop generating the Balanced Scorecard as this will contain important financial and non-financial measures. Instead, you need to place the sensors in the critical locations.

What about when things are not going well? Measuring the usual set of KPIs is all very well but when you are in a mess you need some intensive care. For businesses struggling with tight cash flow here are top ten tips for some relatively simple Recovery KPIs:

  1. Sales-out Sales-in do not guarantee you a final cash sale to a consumer so focus on the final sales transaction.
  2. Discounts Control how much discounting is taking place by those generous sales people. Is it authorised in advance and at the correct level?
  3. Debtor Days This is money owed to you so negotiate favourable terms and constantly review. If 60 days has been in place for years then it is about time this was challenged so apply some pressure.
  4. Creditor Days You owe this money but if you upset suppliers they will stop supplying! Renegotiate where possible and do your best to pay on time as you never know when you really need a favour.
  5. Overdues Where money is due to you and has exceeded the agreed terms you need a persuader to get on top of late payers.
  6. Forecast Accuracy Do not look at every single SKU; apply segmentation principles. Determine which SKUs are important and make a healthy profit, focus here.
  7. Lost Sales Investigate every significant lost sale and systematically apply a 100-year fix so mistakes do not recur.
  8. Potential write off Monitor stock age internally and at distributors and avoid this criminal cash waste.
  9. RM/PM stock If you are overstocked you should not re-order and you might consider selling some items. Your stocks should be aligned with those important SKUs identified above.
  10. Finished Goods stock Again, ensure your key SKUs are always available in the required quantities. Promote any excess or slow-moving stocks to generate income and minimise potential write off.

In addition to the sensible tight control of discretionary spend this approach can stabilise your vital signs and guide you back to a healthy glow without the intensive glare of the suits from HQ.

Imag courtesy of moggara12 at freedigitalphotos.net 

 

Tags: FMCG, KPI, Supply Chain, Cost Reduction, Inventory Management & Stock Control, balanced scorecard, Recovery

Logistics Outsource Tendering in CEE - Top 7 Hazards

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Nov 16, 2016

This process can be straight forward but a little extra care and knowledge will ensure you achieve the best warehousing and/or transport solution for your business.

Just a quick reality check, do you need to outsource? Before embarking on a complicated and potentially disruptive tender are you convinced your current in-house operation is unsuitable? Think long and hard about outsourcing or you could be trapped in a long-term relationship with someone who may not care about your business as much as you.

Assuming you have taken the correct decision let us look at 7 things that can go wrong.

1. Process Leadership If possible, appoint a leader from outside of the Supply Chain team, e.g. Finance. This will promote impartiality and in any case, many of the key debates will be in the Finance area. For complete impartiality, you might consider hiring an experienced Interim Manager or Consultant who has no long term interest. All contenders will be trying to pick up snippets of advantageous information and you must not compromise the tender process in any way.

2. Qualification. Get an idea for which companies are likely to be interested in and capable of being your 3PL partner. Do not be surprised if your list is relatively small but you should aim for 8-10 contenders in this first sweep. Contact these companies with a questionnaire asking them to outline their capabilities, pedigree and reputation in your geography and follow this up with a face to face meeting where you can get a better feel for competence and commitment.

3. Cost Comparison. Outsourcing is not always about cost reduction but the costs of the 3PL contenders will be a major element in the decision. Ensure you know your accurate current costs for the entire service you are expecting the 3PL to provide. You need transparency on your own cost structure to make a valid and meaningful comparison.

4. Time Expectations. Don't rush the process despite the pressure from above (or below) to make a change. You will be reliant on your 3PL to support your business so make sure a timetable is agreed with all stakeholders, including your own Supply Chain people. The tender process will not be a secret however hard you try and your people will be nervous. The changeover should fall in a slack period so avoid your seasonal peaks and major promotional periods.

5. People. If you are outsourcing your existing in-house Logistics function, then you are either going to make several staff redundant or you will be looking for the new 3PL to take those staff on board. Either way you must treat people in the best way possible or your service levels will suffer as you make this difficult change.

supply_chain_3pl_logistics_transport.jpgIf you are making staff redundant you must keep them fully informed at each critical step. Why not consider an escalating loyalty bonus linked to performance? If existing staff members are being offered the opportunity to join the new 3PL then it is your responsibility to ensure terms and conditions are fair. From experience in CEE it is wise to build a "parachute" agreement into the new contract ensuring existing terms and conditions are maintained for a period of say, 12-18 months.

 

6. Beware of well- meaning Distributor partners trying to step up to the mark as a 3PL and be similarly aware of any of the big names who are not present locally but "expect to be". This means they are unlikely to enter your market unless they get your business and you will not appreciate being their new guinea-pig!

7. Start-up Phase. Ensure your tendering process includes a clear understanding of what will happen as the business is transferred. How soon will KPI's be at the required level? Does the 3PL have the necessary staff with relevant skills, e.g. narrow aisle FLT drivers. Do they have extra FLT batteries than can be swapped to maintain the operation? Has the WMS been robustly tested? Do they have sufficient trucks and drivers?.........Even some of the big name 3PLs make mistakes at this crucial time.

Taking care of these 7 elements will help you move through the all-important implementation phase to a steady business state without surprises.

Some 3PLs tend to be very slick at securing new business but some of them are not very good at keeping it!

Want to know more about logistics in the CEE region?  Check out these posts too!

Logistics: Working With 3rd Party Logistics Providers in CEE 

Working With 3PLP's in CEE - When did you last see your stock count?

Top tips to improve your cycle counting & avoid suffering stock shock 

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Customer service, Logistics Service Provider, Supply Chain, Cost Reduction, Transportation, 3PL

FMCG:Top 10 Smash Hits of Warehousing & Logistics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, May 20, 2015

Hello pop pickers, here is this weeks’ top 10 smash hits in this important but often forgotten part of the FMCG Supply Chain.

FMCG_top_ten_warehousing_and_logisict_hitsAt number 10 is All Systems Go by Donna Summer – Do not cut costs on your Warehouse Management System (WMS) and avoid any untried local “specials”. Make sure all stakeholders are involved in the design specification at an early stage to avoid costly and “least worst” bolt-ons later.

Staying at number 9 is Prodigy with Out Of Space - Ensure your chosen Third Party Logistics Provider (3PLP) has sufficient space or can expand to meet your growth expectation. If your 3PLP offers you a site which is boxed in and cannot expand then walk away!

Old favourites Smokie with For A Few Dollars More lie 8th – avoid the temptation to accept the lowest 3PLP quote, however tempting. Cost is not everything and if you bite on the low quote you will probably pay for it in the long run. Evaluate 3PLP offers thoroughly including which staff they intend to deploy on your business. Also, is it really cheaper and more efficient to outsource your logistics capability?

Up And Away from the Banned of St Trinians pops up at number 7 this week – your fast moving, profit generating brands should be on the floor or lower racks to facilitate picking. Those slow moving or seasonal items (in that case why do you have ANY stock?) should be on the top row and up and out of the way.

Alliyah bringing us Age Ain’t Nothing But A Number stays at number 6 – your WMS must be capable of carrying out stock ageing analysis to prevent losses from expired products. If age analysis is not carried out you will lose sales when you realise your “stock” is not actually suitable for legal sale.

Holding steady at number 5 is Counting Every Minute from Sonia – if you want to avoid a severe financial shock at the end of the year then you must take responsibility for ensuring stock is accurately counted. In addition to statutory fiscal counting you should activate routine cycle counting to ensure your data retains accuracy. Secondly, if you see a stock mismatch early enough you may be able to rectify this before memories fade and time moves on.

Keep On Truckin’ by Eddie Kendricks sits at 4 this week – whether you chose electric powered narrow aisle or standard FLT’s do a simple check and ensure battery type are interchangeable across the fleet AND sufficient extra batteries are available to ensure 24/7 coverage. Surprisingly, idle FLT’s are a common sight when battery budgets have been cut. (They only seem to run out of power when it is busy. Right?)

Sittin’ On The Dock Of The Bay by Otis Redding begins the top 3 countdown – how many loading bays does your 3PLP have or propose for a new build? You have to get stock in at the same time as you move stock out. The almost inevitable month end bonus push from Sales will expose a simple lack of doors and bays.

Living In A Box by the delightfully titled Living in a Box is at number 2 – forgive my indulgence. I think this is a great Supply Chain themed song so it gets in!

It Takes Two Baby by ageing rockers Rod Stewart and Tina Turner leads the warehousing chart this week – do not assume your 3PLP knows enough about your business to leave him alone on a day to day basis. You need daily discussions to resolve operational issues plus monthly performance reviews at an appropriate senior level. Get yourself an office in the 3PLP premises and work hard at the relationship on a daily basis.

Enchange_improve_lsp

 

Images courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net and Enchange Ltd.

 

Tags: FMCG, Logistics Service Provider, Dave Jordan, WMS, Cost Reduction, Logistics Management

Improve Supply Chain Performance via Total Productive Maintenance

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jun 25, 2014

When I first came across Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) I was sceptical of yet another ”blue sky” approach to pursuing manufacturing excellence. Surely, this would soon be replaced by the next set of buzz-word initials dreamed up by smart-suited consultants. But no; I saw the light and now I’m a believer (RIP Davy Jones) in this technique that originated in Japan.

If you have a factory that is running below par in terms of efficiency, output, reliability or cost etc then TPM could be the ideal tool to achieve a sustainable turnaround. Companies do not like under-performing factories and there is usually somewhere else they could make their products better, faster or cheaper. So, if your factory is under threat of closure you might consider following the TPM principles.

TPM is not rocket science but it requires just as much senior management buy-in and patience as an S&OP process demands. There are multiples levels of TPM success but even the basics will require a significant and sustainable change in behaviour. Kick off with the Kaizen 5S approach which is remarkably simple stuff.

Total Productive MaintenanceKaizen 5S is based on the translation of 5 Japanese words relating to systematic improvement and maintenance of a clean, efficient, well organised operation.

  1. Sort – Sort out what you really need – I mean really need! Throw out anything that has been hanging around for a few years “just in case”. Check out your spare parts store and see what items are held for equipment you no longer own!
  2. Straighten – Have you ever mislaid your car keys? This system creates a dedicated space for every tool or spare part located near to where it is needed.
  3. Scrub – Clean the machines and the production area thoroughly. Dust can affect quality, spills can be hazardous and well maintained equipment lasts longer.
  4. Standardise - If you use identical working practices for maintenance and cleaning your employees will become highly proficient. Standardisation provides you with a flexible workforce that can be deployed where needed and without a training period.
  5. Sustain – From the factory manager to the tea boy you must keep the faith and sustain every initiative. This is very difficult at first but you have to grit your teeth and keep going.

Of course, this is merely a snap-shot of what TPM entails but it shows the basic elements you need to start the journey. As mentioned, the first tentative steps can be painful but if you stay the course the benefits are immense in efficiency and employee satisfaction. The principles apply equally to logistic centres, offices; essentially everywhere people work.

Oh, but don’t try this at home or a divorce is highly probable, believe me!

Image credit: corbindavenport.blogspot.co.uk

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Manufacturing Footprint, Supply Chain, S&OP, Cost Reduction

FMCG SKU complexity: range extension by stealth!

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Nov 13, 2013

What made me think of that? Do you remember that playground game called Statues? One person is the “museum” Curator and stands at the end of a field or yard. Everyone else stands an agreed distance away from the Curator.  The aim of the game is for a "Statue" to touch or tag the Curator.

The Curator turns away from the Statues and then they run and try to tag the Curator. However, whenever the Curator turns around, the Statues must freeze for as long as the Curator looks their way.  If a Statue is caught wobbling or moving, they are sent back to the starting line to begin again.

The same is happening in FMCG board rooms across the globe.

I am a frequent visitor to FMCG retails outlets for both business and the “pleasure” of seeing domestic senior management investing our money. When in different countries I always take a look at the local retailers to see what is different or innovative. One thing struck me on recent visits to three different countries. My word there are a lot of skus on the shelves, on racks, on gondolas, on the floor and even hanging from the ceiling. Do you really need all of them?

CEO’s speak about “necessary complexity” and “selective assortment” but as far as I can see skus are being added to portfolios willy-nilly, with major emphasis on the willy. Every time you add an sku you are incurring extra cost and less efficiency in the Supply Chain but these are rarely used as the basis for a new introduction. Do all your skus actually pay their own way or are they actually destroying value?

SKU complexity cost resized 600Analysis at a brand level is for sales and marketing to either brag or invent excuses about in-market performance. You really do need to ensure every single sku is adding something to the corporate pot over and above what it costs to have the sku on the portfolio. Once you have established the status quo you then need only to focus on those with turnover and profit/margin at the lower end of whatever scale you define.

When an sku is clearly not paying its way then notice should be served and if improvement is not forthcoming, delist. Get rid of the dead wood and spend scarce resources behind what is actually successful. I am not suggesting a ruthless sku rationalisation process in the style of King Henry VIII (strictly 1 in: 1 out) but a routine process with board level involvement will pay dividends.

Whatever process you put in place there are team members who simply worship skus. They like variants and different colours and numerous pack sizes and X number of facings like the competition, whether they make money or not. Oh, and don’t forget promotions and special editions as this is where the Statues mentioned earlier come in.

When the CEO is not looking, skus that were meant to be temporary or tactical become permanent skus. The CEO looks around and asks if sku numbers are under control and he gets nods from sales and marketing but turns away again before the Supply Chain and Finance guys can get a word in. As the Curator of your business you need to be firm but fair with what is on your portfolio. If some people don’t like that then perhaps divorce is the only answer – beheading is best avoided.

Why not check out the SKU Complexity e-book?

Image courtesy of Ambro at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, CEO, Supply Chain, Cost Reduction, Sales