Supply Chain Blog

FMCG Route To Market: Until debt do us part

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jun 20, 2018

What about your company? Do you have great brands and brand awareness, a fantastic extended supply chain, an analytics package, tight financial control, top class HR, the best sales force, innovative marketing? If you tick all these boxes then life must be good, yes? Sadly, not always and some big-name companies frequently get the important distributor relationship badly wrong.

Blue chip companies with internal operational excellence continue to flounder when serving the Traditional Trade, particularly in D&E markets. Admittedly, this trade channel has reduced in importance over the past years but it still accounts for a sizeable portion of markets which are starting to return to growth. International Key Accounts and Local Key Accounts will continue to take share in urban areas but in a country as vast as Romania, for example they will not conquer the rural market in the medium term.

Producers need knowledgeable and reliable Route To Market partners to reach the smaller corner shop outlets and kiosks. There is no shortage of operators willing to be distributors for big name clients but how many of them are really equipped and ready to do the job properly? Producers are often guilty of placing their reputations and ultimately profits, in the hands of enthusiastic amateurs. In the sporting definition, true amateurs do not get paid for their work and distributors do not get paid by producers when they fail to meet targets.

Unfortunately, instead of doing something about the short-comings of distributors, producers proudly celebrate securing penalties or better terms through negotiating against poor performance. What is the point of doing that? Instead of carping on about how terrible are these "partners" why not get out there and help them?

You cannot build houses on sand yet producers expect distributors to swiftly dove-tail into their in-house processes, IT, style, ethics, reporting schedule etc. Yes, they probably exaggerated their capabilities and readiness during the selection pitch but you should be able to see through that or at least be ready to quickly assess capability.

Is it any wonder why so many distributors go under when they are not considered partners and in some cases, are believed to be a hindrance? Distributors do not deliberately make mistakes that lead to their own reduced income. They too are in business to make a few Euros to take home at the end of the month. However, when the penalties add up and the distributor gets into debt, that is when they need producer support and not a kick to the stomach.FMCG_RTM_DISTRIBUTORS_PARTNERSHIPS.jpgProducers need to look closely at the capability matrix offered by their distributors (or more importantly, potential distributors) and in most cases, this will not match up to requirements. Do something about this; build capability where it lacks and you will reap the benefits in having proactive partners going that extra kilometre to make a sale for you. 

Those FMCG producers who are in tune with distributors strengths and weaknesses AND do something about the latter will be in pole position with a Ferrari while less wise competitors are at the back of the grid with a horse and cart. The route to your market can be a lot easier than you are making it!

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

Tags: FMCG, Route to Market, Dave Jordan, Distribution

FMCG Inventory Shrinkage & Control - It's a Dog's Life

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Jun 18, 2018

Do you find yellow dog biscuits stuffed in your window frames? 

Well, I’d expect such occurrences to be as rare as a squirrel with a nut allergy but I find it all the time. Our house has mosquito nets on the windows as our summers are rather hot and the little blighters bite with pure human hatred.  The nets slide up and down between 2 small, vertical brushes on either side of the window to make them impregnable to blood seeking buzzers.

Within these brushes is where I find yellow dog biscuits. Not brown or red or any other colour, only yellow canine munchies. (And while we are on this important subject, if dogs are colour blind why do we give them different coloured biscuits?) You might presume that our half Jack Russell-half Mr. Bean dog Patch is responsible. Is he hiding them away for a sneaky midday or midnight snack? Does he know about some impending global dog chow shortage? I doubt Patch is the culprit as some of these windows are 7 metres off the ground and our dog is yet to work out how to find and climb a ladder and then put the ladder away without me knowing.

FMCG Stock inventory controlSo, how do the biscuits find their way into my window frames? Not surprisingly perhaps, the biscuit thieves are birds; magpies to be precise. I guess they are storing up for a rainy day or winter or some other event. They are known to be attracted by shiny objects but I cannot see the connection with a fairly bland crunchy snack. Also, as Patch eats inside the house they cannot be my/his biscuits so the magpies are stealing them from another poor dog in the area.

The house has many windows so the amount of stolen food is quite high and as I now regularly clear out the stash, the amount really starts to add up.  Some pooch somewhere is not getting his or her full share to eat. That poor dogs’ human probably thinks their poodle is really content and eating well when in fact a magpie is regularly taking the yellow biscuits away. Of course, maybe the poodle doesn’t like the yellow ones. 

Ok Dave, what do we have here and what is this to do with Supply Chain? Let us take a look at what is happening:

1. Supply Chain inventory is not secure as stock shrinkage is occurring on an almost daily basis and yet nobody appears to notice. When did you last see your stock count?

          2. Stock is in the wrong location to serve the needs of the intended customers and consumers. When you have stock in the wrong places you will inevitably develop an overstock in your Producer warehouse network.

          3. Consumer demand is artificially high resulting in over-stocking and unnecessary spend along the Supply Chain.

          4. Ultimately, the final consumer is receiving poor Customer Service.

About the only aspect impressive in this is the quality of the logistics in getting the stolen biscuits from a dog bowl into my window frames. I will keep a look out for any stolen jewellery but I fear I will only have biccies to clear away.

Put simply, if you do not take great care with your own inventory somebody else will!

Image courtesy of bplanet at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: FMCG, Logistica Management, Dave Jordan, Supply Chain, Inventory Management & Stock Control

How Spreadsheets Undermine Your FMCG ERP

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Jun 11, 2018

Despite what you may wish to believe the answer is probably, yes. You have invested heavily in brand new ERP software and similarly heavily in some smart, young consultancy people to run the implementation. You will have spent some timing debating and making these choices as the change to an all encompassing and integrated ERP is a huge step and at the same time a huge risk for your company.

Suddenly the flexibility to back-date or correct entries is lost or at least there is a rigid and auditable procedure to follow in order to make any adjustments. Sudden uplifts in Sales cannot be slipped in unnoticed at month-end and neither can supply shortages or marketing tardiness with promotional activity. Everything you do in a good ERP is recorded and can be seen.

ERP System ImplementationIf your ERP really is the only software being used to run your business then a hearty well done to you. However, in a surprisingly large number of companies the all important role of change management has not received the required seniority or focus.  Staff who have been using spreadsheets for maybe 10 - 15 years (it was released in 1985!) cannot and will not stop using them just because they have been trained in a new ERP.  Spreadsheets are like a cuddly teddy at bedtime; they are familiar, comforting, not demanding and always there!

An element of your decision to implement a new ERP was probably a supplier guarantee that people productivity and data accuracy would be improved. In reality you will find staff operating a covert shadow ERP on the same old spreadsheets. Detailed planning, sales and allocation decisions are being made on spreadsheets and then manually inserted into ERPs. Commonly, decisions are taken in isolation of S&OP and lack the consistency that ERP master data brings plus the all important history development for the business baseline.

Staff efficiency and data accuracy have certainly not improved; they have worsened. The tedious “cut and paste” of data into the ERP is time consuming and fraught with error. Post ERP implementation is always a rough time for businesses  as they get to grips with a new way of working but is it any wonder some stay in a continual state of intensive care?

If you pay sufficient attention to change management you can lessen the impact. Should staff not see the medium terms benefits outweighing the short term inconvenience then they will operate the shadow ERP.  The change manager has to clearly show what the ERP brings to people first and subsequently the company – not the other way around.

Of course, one solution might be to deactivate the spread sheet program on the network until ERP discipline is second nature? Now, who is brave enough to do that?

Image courtesy of HikingArtist

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Pharma, ERP/SAP, Supply Chain Analytics, Integrated Business Planning, ERP

FMCG – Hunker down and find Supply Chain Analytics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jun 06, 2018

Have you ever “hunkered down”? I remember being asked to hunker down during a business game training course many years ago and I had no idea what I was supposed to do. Eventually I had to ask as failing to follow the hunker downwards request appeared to be causing a bit of a problem for the American presenter.

This hunkering failure occurred during one of the many versions of the Beer Game in which I have taken part or delivered over the years. Anyone who has been involved with supply chain activities will probably have taken part in the Beer Game, or the Moussy Game as it is sometimes known in dry countries of the Middle East.

What does the beer game do? The rules are relatively simple and in summary, the overall objective is to meet consumer demand for cases of beer in a complex, extended supply chain while controlling unplanned expense on back orders and inventory. The game involves four overlapping and inter-dependent supply chains, i.e. source, make, distribution, and a retail outlet. There is a cost penalty for holding excess stock and any backlog unfulfilled orders.

Players rely on colleagues in the other departments to do the right things at the right time for the business but frustration soon surfaces. Usually, things do not go well and players feel frustrated because they are not getting the results they expect. Assumptions are made about consumer demand and erratic patterns emerge as backlogs mount and/or massive unnecessary inventory accumulates. It was at this stage in the game I was invited to “hunker down……….”.

Does that sound like your own supply chain – not the hunkering bit? Frustration is common between departments who all aim to do the right thing but only have the necessary data and information to do the right thing for their specific area of responsibility at that specific time. Even after careful consideration and informed debate, the real effect of an adjustment can only be seen in the future.

supply_chain_analytics_fmcg_inventory_performance.jpgIF - a big if -  nothing else changes and all assumptions are correct and accurate then there is a chance the desired effect will develop as predicted. However, life is not like that and certainly not supply chain life.

 

What can happen?

1. New launches kick-in and are successful, or perhaps not.

2. Competition by definition is designed to try and disrupt your plans.

3. The weather turns out rather different to the forecast and nobody wants beer.

4. The economy takes a turn up or down, again.

5. Factories, 3PLPs and distributors all suffer performance variability.

6. Customers and consumers change their needs and habits.

Etc., etc., etc., this list really is endless. Absolutely anything can happen to turn apparently sensible decisions into foolish, future forecast failure.

Hey, what about all that expensive IT we have? Doesn’t that help us understand what is going on and what is going to happen? No, not necessarily. Common supply chain IT tells us what has happened, what is happening, where and when but not precisely why an event happened or what will happen.

Subtle differences perhaps but to up your game you need to hunker down with Supply Chain Analytics to gain a full unexpurgated understanding of how changes you make today will impact the future and more importantly, how you can change that future.

Yes, you can change the future with a classy analytics tool.

Image courtesy of Enchange at Enchange.com

Tags: Customer service, FMCG, CEO, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, IT

FMCG Supply Chain: KPI Scorecards - Don’t look back in anger

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, May 30, 2018

UK has been my base for a few days and even in that short time I have started to genuinely think I must now be a different nationality if not from a different planet. When my denim jeans rip at the knees it is time to throw them out.  I do not have a badly drawn and inappropriately placed tattoo. Nothing on me is pierced or decorated with metal, precious or otherwise.

I do not have a preference for Ant or Dec – the “best” UK double act in a sea of tepid TV reality dross? What is Keith Lemon all about? So many TV channels yet so little talent and even less TV shows worth watching. I put litter in waste bins. I still know how to queue. Even my waistline is now considered trim. I own music recordings where the performers wrote the lyrics and play the instruments and don’t get me started on that things like the Kardashians. 

Nevertheless, there is something consistent. Something that has not noticeably changed since I packed my company leaving gift suitcases in 1991 and departed for the Saudi desert. Traffic Wardens.

FMCG_KPI_SCORECARD_SUPPLY_CHAIN.jpgBeing a Traffic Warden is a universally hated career choice and possibly third on the detest list after Tax Inspectors and Bankers these days with Politicians being universally disliked, of course. In the UK wardens patrol the streets looking for vehicles illegally parked even for a short time or even if the front bumper/fender overlaps the authoritative  yellow lines by a few mm.

Why do they exist; the role that is, not the people? What good are they doing for the general public and the fuel duty/road tax cash-cow motorist? Are they here to keep the Queen’s highways, byways and pavements clear of transportation obstacles to allow free flow of vehicles, people and prams? Or, are they here to generate as much revenue as possible for councils and police authorities?

Is their role to gently correct errors, show understanding and guide people on their future behaviour or are they here to discipline, penalise, visually allocate blame with a sticky yellow ticket and generally strike fear and hate into drivers? Should people hide and shy away from traffic wardens and treat them with mistrust or should they be seen as a welcome, integral part of day to day UK living.

Friend or foe? Beauty or beast? Pariah or paragon? 

So what does your Supply Chain team think about your monthly KPI Scorecard discussions within your IBP/S&OP process? Is it a meeting all about blame and backwards looking fault finding and discipline? Or is it what it should be, an open discussion about what needs to be done better by everyone in the current and coming periods?

You certainly must learn the lessons of past shortcomings but applying the learnings to the future is a far more positive and healthy experience for everyone. Supply Chain Analytics can assist you in reaching a much more mature approach to running your business effectively and without people being at each others throats.

Applying a “…don’t look back in anger” approach will lead you and the business to a much more profitable oasis within the market place.

Image courtesy of iosphere at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, KPI, S&OP, Supply Chain Analytics, IBP

An FMCG Success Story; Focus on customers and enjoy the consumer benefits

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, May 28, 2018

Once upon a time there was an FMCG company that I will refer to as “Foresight”. “Foresight” had spent many years and many Euros creating a slick inbound Supply Chain.

  • Top class global, regional and collaborative buying
  • Flexible manufacturing network
  • A state of the art ERP
  • Rigorous S&OP as the key business process

Slick inbound Supply ChainWith all those important boxes ticked they must be successful.....but they were not; not even close. In their peer group they were not number 1, top and bottom line growth was getting harder and harder. Throw in difficult economic conditions and the consumption of their product offering plummeted – double digit style. A large FMCG business and quite a few personal reputations were not looking pretty.

The problem was a surprising lack of focus at the customer end of the Supply Chain. Both International Key Accounts(IKA) and the Traditional Trade (TT) were being poorly serviced.

A lot of hard work upstream was being wasted through inefficiency and actually, ignorance. The situation had existed for a number of years but as the same malaise was common in the industry nobody could see the benefit or indeed the need for “getting ones act together”. “Last amongst equals” was hardly a motivating and compelling business proposition for an international big name.

Seeking external expert assistance “Foresight” started out on an adventure that would change the way they approached business at the customer end of the chain.

Customer Service.   This was something “Foresight” thought it was already good at providing but critical aspects were lacking:

  1. Customer Service responsibilities were fragmented and lacked clear and unambiguous leadership.
  2. “Customer Service personnel” had received no training in the subject - nobody really wanted to take responsibility.
  3. “Customer Service” was actually limited to invoice preparation. Proactive interaction with customers and problem solution were not in job descriptions.

This hardly projected an image of a caring “Foresight” and this was a huge risk considering the increasing power of the retailers…. 

Route To Market (RTM). “This is under control for TT and it seems to work”, however RTM was in the Sales black box and that box needed opening and shaking upside down vigorously!

  1. The Distributor RTM network had been in place for several years and was decaying. “Foresight” salesman interaction with Distributors was far from an open win-win relationship.
  2. Several Distributors were simply incapable and/or ill equipped to represent such a major company. Some actually did not wish to be involved.
  3. “Foresight” did not know on whom they could rely in their network or how large and obvious opportunities could be targeted.

In-house Sales bonuses were linked to sell-in and the remaining steps to the consumer were ignored at “Foresight” level and left in the hands of some indifferent distributors.

The cures were not simple or quick but they were effective and the payback was fast and sustained.

Customer Service Centre“Foresight” now operates a centralised Customer Service department looking after customer needs in a standardised and caring manner. Phone calls are answered by someone who wants to help and the customer is not passed from pillar to post trying to find someone interested in their problem. Retailers now see CS staff face to face as they proactively take steps to understand the needs of both sides of the partnership. The Retailer office was once “sales only” and off bounds to other departments but not now and the benefit is clear and significant.

In RTM, “Foresight” carried out a comprehensive assessment of their distributor network making evaluations of all aspects of each distributor’s organisation. The strengths and weaknesses of each partner are now known and understood. “Foresight” now knows where there is receiver capacity to take more responsibility and a leading role in market deployment. Similarly, they also know to tread carefully with a number of distributors who are struggling financially or simply not equipped to meet expectations. “Foresight's” efforts are now focused on those areas providing maximum opportunity and reward. The “one size fits all” approach has gone and distributors are managed as important partners.

In combination these changes have transformed the business and success has been quick to materialise.  “Foresight” enjoys a leading position in its sector while competitors scrap around trying to find growth that is clearly there but they cannot reach.

For “Foresight” at least, they really are able to live happily ever after!

 

Tags: Customer service, Brewing & Beverages, FMCG, Route to Market, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Distribution

Balanced Scorecard KPIs: Keeping Track of Business Performance 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Mar 29, 2018

How do you keep track of Supply Chain performance within your FMCG, Brewing or Pharmaceutical business? You do, don’t you? If you are not measuring any KPIs then perhaps you should stop here, read this KPI piece and then pop back and carry on.

You can measure and report in many formats as long as you measure appropriate KPIs for your business. One of the most pointless tasks is calculating and reporting a “KPI” which is in fact worthless and of no beneficial interest. Colleagues in Sales & Marketing usually assume they are immune from KPIs as they gleefully sit back and let the Supply Chain guy take the flak at Board meetings. In reality however, the actions of everyone in the company must be reflected in one or more KPIs. If there is anyone in your business who is not impacting a KPI in some way then perhaps you might consider a round of head-count reduction!

The following is a demonstration example of a Balanced Scorecard of business KPIs. While many are indeed Supply Chain related you need only look at Sales Forecast Accuracy to see how other departments can influence that measurement to a far greater extent. KPIs are designed (usually 2 or 3 per discipline) and presented within the company Scorecard.  Target performance threshold levels are agreed (RAG – Red, Amber, Green) and presented monthly within the S&OP process to measure success and target further improvement.

Supply Chain KPIs

There will undoubtedly be more PIs calculated around the business but those in the scorecard really must be the priorities; those that provide actionable information.

The use of simple colour notation allows business managers to see exactly where problems exist allowing them to focus resources. Conversely, you quickly see what is going well and where you might have to raise the bar to maintain and improve further.  (If you are measuring your KPIs at the same level as 5 years ago then that may reflect a business which is stagnating.)

Whatever design you use it does not really matter but:

1. You must measure KPIs relevant to your overall business strategy and performance.

2. You must report them promptly and widely.

3. They must be discussed at the top table, routinely.

4. You must review and delete/insert new KPIs as the business need develops.

5. You must ensure the targets are stretching but achievable as a constant red display is demotivating.

While KPI stands for Key Performance Indicator it could easily be considered as Keep People Interested!

Image courtesy of Enchange.

 

Tags: Brewing & Beverages, FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Pharma, KPI, Supply Chain, S&OP

Key Performance Indicators or just monthly data dumping? 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Mar 27, 2018

Last month I spent a few weeks enjoying the UK weather disaster as 10mm of snow brought life to a halt. While there I moved the heiress into her new apartment - not a flat now as student days are over, very posh. Hopefully, that will be the last time I have to manage boxes down a narrow and winding staircase and my glass back can get a much needed rest.

Job done, I made my way back to base with an unpleasant 15 hour delay on BlueAir but at least there was no jobsworth amongst the crew.  Despite the weather I continued my minimalist approach to clothing to ease my way through the various security screenings. I wore no belt, no watch, no metal at all in an attempt to glide through the checks without being patted, prodded or made to make a second pass through the metal detector. Unfortunately, my innocent pack of UNO playing cards looks like plastic explosive, apparently.

The end of the world was in progress on arrival back in Bucharest. Heavy dark and angry clouds were dispensing precipitation by the bucket load and it was relentless. The sleet quickly soaked my UK grade Arctic coat and everything underneath including socks.  Futile attempts at shelter included the held-aloft flat newspaper and the rather dangerous shopping bag with eye holes over the head. Even the all in one little black bin bag number a girl was wearing (or was it a dress?) was ineffective in diverting any of the torrential downpour. This was a real storm without escape where complete saturation was guaranteed and inevitable. 

I felt rather like an FMCG CEO. Saturated by data that people believe he/she needs to see in order to run the business. Not actionable information but raw data. Completely submersed in meaningless numbers and perceived trends. Often, that data is aimed at passing the buck to other departments for failure or lack of success or to ensure backside protection during the post-mortem that takes place long after the month or quarter or whatever period has closed.

Even if you do not run a swish ERP you need to be able to address in-market issues while you still have a chance of making a difference. However, to do that you need to receive information which quickly converts to relevant knowledge and then facilitates actions. To actually see the reality of market performance you don’t need masses of numbers, you need facts.

image.pngIf you don’t have a KPI or Balanced Scorecard then sort one out quickly. If you already monitor performance in this way then take a long hard look at what is actually being reported; is it for the benefit of the reporting colleague/department or for the benefit of the entire company?

Remember that KPIs never tell the full story. When a KPI refuses to improve despite all efforts it may well be due to the impact of another completely different and apparently unrelated measure. In such cases you should adopt a Supply Chain Analytics Approach to deep dive into the detail and really see what is happening all along your Supply Chain.

Image courtesy of SupplyVue at Concentra

 

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, CEO, Performance Improvement, Pharma, KPI, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Analytics

Time to Spring Clean your Supply Chain in FMCG?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Mar 22, 2018

Are market conditions getting any better, really? Many big name companies are heading for indifferent full year 2017 results and all caution about the continuing “difficult market conditions”. Ok, so 2017 has been put to bed but many will be paying the price for the mammoth last quarter efforts which must have made the advertising and promotional agencies extremely wealthy. I wonder what a snap-shot of bottom line profitability looked like over the final 3 months of 2017?

If the economy is not much better than last year what exactly can you do differently to keep ahead of your competitors in 2018?  If you had all the time in the world you could apply all of the Top 10 New Year Supply Chain Resolutions. You might not have the time and resources to tackle all of them but there are a couple you can take advantage of for some quick wins. Give your Supply Chain a much needed Spring Clean (I know, it is snowing heavily as I type this in Bucuresti) and see the difference this can make.

Most businesses will have carried out a stock count at year end. You do count your stock don’t you? If you don’t then I suspect you will have less inventory than you thought! You should now have a clear list of those items which are clearly overstocked, close to expiry, old label etc. Every day you keep hold of this stock destroys value as the expense slowly but surely chips away at your bottom line making your life unnecessarily difficult. Get rid of it! Give it to charity. You could even sell it! If you clear out your stocks you will naturally create a slightly more responsive and faster Supply Chain that focusses on value creating SKUs.

FMCG_SKU_COMPLEXITY_REDUCTION_SPRING_CLEAN.jpgDo you know how many “must have” core and promotional SKUs you added in 2017 in order to get as close as possible to top down HQ targets? In difficult times it is easy for processes and procedures to be overlooked in the search for ever more sales. Every SKU costs you money even if it may be  difficult to quantify in your business. 

Do all of the SKUs actually contribute to profit? If you do not monitor profitability by SKU then a considerable proportion may exist for little or worse still, negative benefit. You need to be dispassionate about culling SKUs that are not performing. As far as possible you should keep Sales and Marketing out of that decision making process until your business case is water-tight. Otherwise, these colleagues will always come up with a reason why XYZ SKU is critical to the future of the universe!

Each of these initiatives is relatively straightforward and certainly not resource intensive. Carrying out this simple Spring Clean and getting your house in good order will help you focus your efforts on winning in the market place.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: SKU, FMCG, Dave Jordan, Pharma, Inventory Management & Stock Control

A Practical Guide to FMCG SKU Complexity Reduction 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Mar 20, 2018

If your business is struggling to cope with day to day sales while managing innovation and range extensions then give your SKU list a thorough review. Not just a cursory glance but a scientific evaluation of what brings in the profit and what eats at the same. Few businesses are lucky to operate with just one or two monster SKUs but an excessive list of items on the price list can severely affect your customer service performance.

In the customer service link above we looked at the cost to have a single SKU on the books and it is not insignificant when you take all elements of supply into account. If SKUs do not pay for themselves and contribute to the bottom line then why do they exist? SKUs plodding along with low margin AND low sales turnover cannot be worth the cost and effort of maintaining them, can they? They are simply getting in the way of potentially more profitable SKUs.

If you could base your business on high margin/high turnover SKUs then of course you would. Life is not that simple and the market place is ever more competitive so you need to constantly review the wisdom of what you are putting in front of consumers. Unless your business is in dire straits a large proportion of your SKUs will be either low margin/high turnover or vice versa. Both situations can provide reasonably healthy growth but wouldn’t it be better if you could edge them towards the high/high green quartile as per the diagram below?SKU ComplexityThe first step is to make a very rough estimate of what your business spends on keeping an SKU on the price list. This is not an accurate science but you need to put a “stake in the ground” and agree a number, say 30,000Eur. If the margin of a particular SKU does not at least break-even then delisting should be considered. Staff who look after those SKUs in the yellow segments need to be challenged on a quarterly basis to get their SKUs away from the red and towards the green, or delist.

If you carry out such an assessment and find that a majority of your SKUs are in the red segment then you might benefit from a professional spring clean of your portfolio. Such an approach will remove any emotion and bias when clinically assessing what you should be placing on shelves.

Image courtesy of Enchange at Enchange.com.

 

Tags: SKU, FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Pharma, Supply Chain Analytics