Supply Chain Blog

Digital Supply Chain: This is the way, its Analytics!

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Aug 16, 2018

Rather a lot of blogging going on around the area of Digital Supply Chain and Analytics at present. Amongst all the serious stuff I thought it about time we took a well-earned break and enjoyed a bit of Supply Chain Comic Relief.

SUPPLY_CHAIN_ANALYTICS_COMIC_RELIEF

A very catchy tune and a very topical subject.

This the way, its Analytics (Is this the way to Amarillo)

When results are falling
And your boss is always calling
How I long to see why
Business success passes us by.
All our monthly measures continue to be flat
What I really need to know is where our supply chain’s at.

This is it, its analytics
See your chain and everything in it
See the power of analytics
It’s SupplyVue, it waits for you.
This is it, its analytics
Seems like we are wasting ages
Pouring over endless data
And SupplyVue, it waits for you.

Sha la la la la la la la
Sha la la la la la la la
Sha la la la la la la la
And SupplyVue it waits for you.

Supply Vue takes your data
Turns it into something much greater
Providing information
To back up the decisions your taking.

Look beyond the numbers
No more guessing again
Opportunities are all tested
Through future modellin’.

This is it, its analytics

Provides clarity on the business

Showing the way to success
Its SupplyVue, it waits for you.

This is it it’s analytics
I now see my chain and everything in it
The futures bright with this
And SupplyVue, it waits for you.

Sha la la la la la la la
Sha la la la la la la la
Sha la la la la la la la
And SupplyVue it waits for you.

Sha la la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la la
Sha la la la la la la la
And SupplyVue it waits for you.

How long will you have that tune in your head? Enjoy.

Image courtesy of rakratchada torsap at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Dave Jordan, Humour, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Analytics

Supply Chain: Goats, Kennedy Brexit & Analytics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Jun 21, 2018

Over the years I have seen many strange sights on various forms of transport. In the Middle East I sat next to a vicious looking falcon on a flight to Bahrain. The falcon was extremely well behaved but then again so was I! In Africa a guy jumped on a tuk-tuk carrying a pig that had ceased to be.

Only last week in Bucuresti a lady brought a goat onto the underground. I guess it could have been a service goat or something similar as guide dogs are still a rarity in Romania. In fact, a guide goat could have some advantages over a dog as it is has its own built-in horn……Also, I wonder if she had to pay to take the goat on board and if so, was it half price for kids?

Whenever you see something dramatic, unusual or out of context you tend to remember that incident or time. People older than myself remember where they where when Kennedy was assassinated. In more recent history I know where I was when Princess Diana died. Only a couple of years ago I remember exactly where I was when I heard the UK had voted to leave the EU. Despite living in an EU country, I and many others where not allowed to vote.

Nobody knew at that time what would happen if UK left the EU – what a basis for a referendum - and that is still the case today although at least the exit remains certain. What will happen to customs tariffs, will UK citizens require visas to reach the sun, will the EU allow right hand drive cars on their road networks? Still nobody knows, and I don’t think anyone will until long after exit happens. However, I will predict a united Ireland, a devolved Scotland (less possibly Wales) and little England in an old tweed suit towing a ferret going cap in hand to join the EU!

Politics and Supply Chain are not common text fellows but in terms of predicting the future they have the same challenges. Hopefully, you make the best decision you can based on the information available and yet you know there is a high probability of getting the outcome completely wrong. If you want to reduce that probability of failure, then you need something over and above your standard ERP IT software.

In the last 10 years, despite investments in sophisticated ERP systems, there are still significant opportunities to improve supply chain performance. Why?

  • Often complex IT packages automate traditional ways of working which results in little improvement or, things are made worse with increased stress in the planning process.
  • The forecast is often blamed – it will never be 100% correct. The issue lies within the supply chain processes, the set-up of the IT and how existing tools are being used.
  • Managing this complexity becomes the real challenge, and to protect themselves, supply chain managers buffer supply chains with cautionary inventory and fat lead-times.

Analytics_supply_chain_forecast_planning

Business planning that puts backside protection as a key priority is destined to failure. Supply Chain Analytics changes the game to make success far more likely and when you take the analytics plunge, you will remember where you where!

Image courtesy of Concentra at Concentra.co.uk

Tags: Dave Jordan, Supply Chain, Forecasting & Demand Planning, Supply Chain Analytics

Supply Chain Analytics smooths production planning AND reduces inventory?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Jun 14, 2018

May Day falling on a Tuesday meant a rare 4 day “weekend” break was enjoyed and the sun shone, in Romania at least. Time to dust off the BBQ for the first time this year and chill in the late April heat. We had some Romanian bred ostrich meat to grill – yes, honestly and what’s more the Romanian word for Ostrich is the perfectly apt Strut!

Everything was rather last-minute, but the salad was done, bread buns cut and buttered, potatoes wrapped in foil were ready and the Prosecco had already popped. Man dons apron with a life size image of a girl in a bikini plus a Knorr chef hat and we are ready to roll.

Well, we would be ready to roll if we had any charcoal!

SUPPLY_CHAIN_ANALYTICS_INVENTORY_PRODUCTION_PLANNINGI guess I could have popped out to the garage to pick a bag up but it ruins the flow of things and anyway I was Prosecco’d up. To a background of female tutting we resorted to another process and turned the gas on in the kitchen.

I only had 6 items to plan but goofed with one of the most important but the absence of any would have scuppered the day. Our last-minute change of plan was not dramatic but we used expensive gas rather than charcoal. This minor domestic challenge shows how unexpected shortages can impact on otherwise smooth processes.

Putting the strut steaks aside let us look at a case study where materials more critical than charcoal were causing problems and how Supply Chain Analytics played their part.

The Challenge

Despite having relatively predictable demand and high stock levels, an FMCG manufacturer still suffered stock-outs of different RM/PM and had to change production plans and schedules constantly to try and maintain service levels. As a result, operating costs were unnecessarily high, and the day-to-day running of the supply chain was absorbing a disproportionate amount of management time due to fire-fighting. Staff morale was dipping – much like mine on Sunday afternoon!

The Solution

SupplyVue took a detailed analytical look at the production sequence using the line changeover matrix and demand plan. This work sought to create the lowest cost manufacturing sequence and a set of “Golden Rules” to maximise efficiency. Using this optimum sequence, SupplyVue used production wheel methodology to create a rolling 16-week production plan. Scenarios were generated showing the trade-offs between manufacturing cost, manning and inventory levels, and between levelling capacity and inventory. In doing this, the management team was able to decide on the production policies that most aligned to their business objectives and specifically, Customer Service.

The Impact

1. A 15% reduction in changeover time through an optimised production wheel approach.

2. Levelled demand to prevent overtime and disrupting shift patterns.

3. Inventory levels plummeted through reduced cycle times and increased conformance to plan.

Supply Chain Analytics would not have saved my BBQ or my ear from a bashing, but you need something with high powered deep data diving capability to understand what is really going on in your supply chain.

Image courtesy of Peter Orseved at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Supply Chain, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, Production Planning

How Spreadsheets Undermine Your FMCG ERP

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Jun 11, 2018

Despite what you may wish to believe the answer is probably, yes. You have invested heavily in brand new ERP software and similarly heavily in some smart, young consultancy people to run the implementation. You will have spent some timing debating and making these choices as the change to an all encompassing and integrated ERP is a huge step and at the same time a huge risk for your company.

Suddenly the flexibility to back-date or correct entries is lost or at least there is a rigid and auditable procedure to follow in order to make any adjustments. Sudden uplifts in Sales cannot be slipped in unnoticed at month-end and neither can supply shortages or marketing tardiness with promotional activity. Everything you do in a good ERP is recorded and can be seen.

ERP System ImplementationIf your ERP really is the only software being used to run your business then a hearty well done to you. However, in a surprisingly large number of companies the all important role of change management has not received the required seniority or focus.  Staff who have been using spreadsheets for maybe 10 - 15 years (it was released in 1985!) cannot and will not stop using them just because they have been trained in a new ERP.  Spreadsheets are like a cuddly teddy at bedtime; they are familiar, comforting, not demanding and always there!

An element of your decision to implement a new ERP was probably a supplier guarantee that people productivity and data accuracy would be improved. In reality you will find staff operating a covert shadow ERP on the same old spreadsheets. Detailed planning, sales and allocation decisions are being made on spreadsheets and then manually inserted into ERPs. Commonly, decisions are taken in isolation of S&OP and lack the consistency that ERP master data brings plus the all important history development for the business baseline.

Staff efficiency and data accuracy have certainly not improved; they have worsened. The tedious “cut and paste” of data into the ERP is time consuming and fraught with error. Post ERP implementation is always a rough time for businesses  as they get to grips with a new way of working but is it any wonder some stay in a continual state of intensive care?

If you pay sufficient attention to change management you can lessen the impact. Should staff not see the medium terms benefits outweighing the short term inconvenience then they will operate the shadow ERP.  The change manager has to clearly show what the ERP brings to people first and subsequently the company – not the other way around.

Of course, one solution might be to deactivate the spread sheet program on the network until ERP discipline is second nature? Now, who is brave enough to do that?

Image courtesy of HikingArtist

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Pharma, ERP/SAP, Supply Chain Analytics, Integrated Business Planning, ERP

Supply Chain Analytics helps international retailer in business turn-around

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Jun 07, 2018

Many will recall that famous Four Yorkshiremen sketch first seen the At Last the 1948 Show and later Monty Python. Four dour characters recall how tough it was when they were younger with each trying to out do the others in a downwards spiral of harshness. While the claims were outrageous and equally ridiculous it had me thinking about how things have changed. If you beamed an 18-year-old back to 1970 what would they see?

  • An analogue telephone attached to a wall with a wire and to call anyone you had to literally dial the numbers with 1 finger using the rotating plastic ring.

  • If you didn’t have a telephone wired into the house you had to put your coat on and walk to a red K6 telephone box, usually in the rain and there’d be a queue. You would need to carry 2p and 10p coins to keep the call active.

  • A television which was probably a black and white model operated by valves housed in a huge rear section. To change channel (there were only 3!) you had to get off your backside, walk across the room and turn a dial, or push a button if you were posh.

  • Need to send someone a message? You did that by writing (possibly typing) on a piece of paper, putting it in an envelope, buying a stamp and popping it in 1 of the red post boxes dotted around.

  • You want to listen to music? Take the black vinyl 7 or 12-inch disk out of the sleeve and place it on the Dansette record player the size of a small suitcase. Manually lift the stylus, place it on the disk and away you go.

I could go on and on and list many examples of life in the pre-digital age. Youngsters today don’t know they’re born!

SUPPLY_CHAIN_ANALYTICS_RETAIL_GLOBALAll of the examples above would also have been used in industry in some form and business has seen equally dramatic changes to how they operate. I will focus only on 1 area here and that is Supply Chain Analytics. No more guessing at how decisions may affect your performance, a good analytics package offers you a virtual crystal ball! Let me take you through a case study.

The Challenge

A well-known international retailer was suffering high levels of inventory in warehouses and in retail outlets plus this stock was the wrong mix for the sales pattern. The company was unable to accurately coordinate the flow of goods from long lead time suppliers to outlets. As a result, expensive emergency air-freighting was used to avoid out of stocks yet, despite this cash draining initiative, working capital was well above target.

The Solution

SupplyVue Analytics reviewed the demand profiles in outlets and at an aggregated level in central warehouses. At outlet-level granularity, the demand was far too sporadic to be forecast, however, at central warehouses, product flow was sufficient to determine a reliable forecast. Analytics demonstrated that a switch to a Kanban pull approach from the central warehouses to outlets would transform inventory levels and eliminate the need for air-freight. In addition, the company implemented a complementary demand-driven replenishment mechanism from central warehouse to multiple suppliers.

The Impact

1. A sustainable 25% reduction in overall inventory levels across a complicated Supply Chain.

2. A deeper understanding of demand profile enabled the company to provide a more predictable and stable signal to suppliers which in turn raised their reliability.

3. Completely eliminated air-freight costs caused by product shortages with an associated increase in Customer Service.

So, progress in this digital age is not all bad and once you have taken a Test Drive or Pilot in Supply Chain Analytics you will wonder how on earth you previously managed. If you need further information please get out your quill and ink write a letter to Enchange!

Image courtesy of photostock at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Dave Jordan, CEO, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics

FMCG – Hunker down and find Supply Chain Analytics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jun 06, 2018

Have you ever “hunkered down”? I remember being asked to hunker down during a business game training course many years ago and I had no idea what I was supposed to do. Eventually I had to ask as failing to follow the hunker downwards request appeared to be causing a bit of a problem for the American presenter.

This hunkering failure occurred during one of the many versions of the Beer Game in which I have taken part or delivered over the years. Anyone who has been involved with supply chain activities will probably have taken part in the Beer Game, or the Moussy Game as it is sometimes known in dry countries of the Middle East.

What does the beer game do? The rules are relatively simple and in summary, the overall objective is to meet consumer demand for cases of beer in a complex, extended supply chain while controlling unplanned expense on back orders and inventory. The game involves four overlapping and inter-dependent supply chains, i.e. source, make, distribution, and a retail outlet. There is a cost penalty for holding excess stock and any backlog unfulfilled orders.

Players rely on colleagues in the other departments to do the right things at the right time for the business but frustration soon surfaces. Usually, things do not go well and players feel frustrated because they are not getting the results they expect. Assumptions are made about consumer demand and erratic patterns emerge as backlogs mount and/or massive unnecessary inventory accumulates. It was at this stage in the game I was invited to “hunker down……….”.

Does that sound like your own supply chain – not the hunkering bit? Frustration is common between departments who all aim to do the right thing but only have the necessary data and information to do the right thing for their specific area of responsibility at that specific time. Even after careful consideration and informed debate, the real effect of an adjustment can only be seen in the future.

supply_chain_analytics_fmcg_inventory_performance.jpgIF - a big if -  nothing else changes and all assumptions are correct and accurate then there is a chance the desired effect will develop as predicted. However, life is not like that and certainly not supply chain life.

 

What can happen?

1. New launches kick-in and are successful, or perhaps not.

2. Competition by definition is designed to try and disrupt your plans.

3. The weather turns out rather different to the forecast and nobody wants beer.

4. The economy takes a turn up or down, again.

5. Factories, 3PLPs and distributors all suffer performance variability.

6. Customers and consumers change their needs and habits.

Etc., etc., etc., this list really is endless. Absolutely anything can happen to turn apparently sensible decisions into foolish, future forecast failure.

Hey, what about all that expensive IT we have? Doesn’t that help us understand what is going on and what is going to happen? No, not necessarily. Common supply chain IT tells us what has happened, what is happening, where and when but not precisely why an event happened or what will happen.

Subtle differences perhaps but to up your game you need to hunker down with Supply Chain Analytics to gain a full unexpurgated understanding of how changes you make today will impact the future and more importantly, how you can change that future.

Yes, you can change the future with a classy analytics tool.

Image courtesy of Enchange at Enchange.com

Tags: Customer service, FMCG, CEO, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, IT

Supply Chain Analytics drives dramatic spare parts inventory reduction

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, May 31, 2018

What business would I like to run or even own? If you had a choice what would it be? A huge global FMCG player or a niche craft brewery in Bourton-on-the-Water? What about starting a pottery in your own home as per the ages old Barclays TV ad? If I had a choice I would buy the company that makes Allen Keys for IKEA.

Every single item you buy contains an Allen Key. Cupboards, shelves, beds, kitchens, chairs. I think you even get an Allen Key when you buy their 4-packs of fresh salmon! How many Allen Keys do they “sell” in a year? The number must be in the millions worldwide; surely, it’s time for a key return initiative?

SUPPLY_CHAIN_ANALYTICS_SPARE_PARTS_INVENTORYAnyway, not all the keys are the same size as IKEA also uses a huge number of different bolts, fixings, screws and nuts and taking their success into account that is quite some inventory. I know IKEA uses a lot of third party manufacturers, but this means huge spare parts inventories are scattered across the globe. I wonder how they manage? I suspect they use some form of Supply Chain Analytics and being IKEA, the package is probably called something like Levy Pupus (it’s an anagram).

While this is not IKEA, I do have an example of how Analytics unlocked working capital and made a significant difference to 1 company with a large spare parts inventory.

The Challenge

This engineering business sold components require for new-build constructions as well as ensuring spare parts availability for subsequent repairs and maintenance. Demand signal profiles were different for each stream and with large differences between individual components, inevitably this was difficult to manage. However, supporting both business streams at high service levels was a USP of the company and therefore vital for success. Perhaps inevitably, the operation was struggling to keep inventory levels under tight control.

The Solution

Analytics was used to segment the demand between the new construction and ongoing spare parts businesses. The team then used SupplyVue to further segment demand for spares into multiple similar granular boxes and analyse the flow of parts through the chain. This analysis reset the replenishment policies and parameters and the resulting inventory availability and stock levels. The analysis revealed inconsistent and poorly matched supply and inventory parameter settings across the portfolio. This provided a significant opportunity to establish a coherent and more appropriate set of policies for each spares segment.

The Impact

1. Pockets of gross excess inventory were identified, and the analysis indicated an 80% inventory reduction was achievable. This resulted in dramatically reduced working capital, lower storage charges AND better service.

2. In addition, the application of more repetitive based replenishment methods and parameters created a much more predictable and smoother demand signal for in-house manufacturing and 3rd party suppliers.

This may be a little more complicated than my desired IKEA key supply business, but it needed a powerful analytics tool to really understand what was going on in a complicated operation.  Analytics can be a once off diagnosis or you can purchase a licence and embed something like SupplyVue into your routine business management.

Why not try a free of charge Supply Chain Health Check?

Image courtesy of hadkhanong at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: CEO, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, Spare Parts

FMCG Supply Chain: KPI Scorecards - Don’t look back in anger

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, May 30, 2018

UK has been my base for a few days and even in that short time I have started to genuinely think I must now be a different nationality if not from a different planet. When my denim jeans rip at the knees it is time to throw them out.  I do not have a badly drawn and inappropriately placed tattoo. Nothing on me is pierced or decorated with metal, precious or otherwise.

I do not have a preference for Ant or Dec – the “best” UK double act in a sea of tepid TV reality dross? What is Keith Lemon all about? So many TV channels yet so little talent and even less TV shows worth watching. I put litter in waste bins. I still know how to queue. Even my waistline is now considered trim. I own music recordings where the performers wrote the lyrics and play the instruments and don’t get me started on that things like the Kardashians. 

Nevertheless, there is something consistent. Something that has not noticeably changed since I packed my company leaving gift suitcases in 1991 and departed for the Saudi desert. Traffic Wardens.

FMCG_KPI_SCORECARD_SUPPLY_CHAIN.jpgBeing a Traffic Warden is a universally hated career choice and possibly third on the detest list after Tax Inspectors and Bankers these days with Politicians being universally disliked, of course. In the UK wardens patrol the streets looking for vehicles illegally parked even for a short time or even if the front bumper/fender overlaps the authoritative  yellow lines by a few mm.

Why do they exist; the role that is, not the people? What good are they doing for the general public and the fuel duty/road tax cash-cow motorist? Are they here to keep the Queen’s highways, byways and pavements clear of transportation obstacles to allow free flow of vehicles, people and prams? Or, are they here to generate as much revenue as possible for councils and police authorities?

Is their role to gently correct errors, show understanding and guide people on their future behaviour or are they here to discipline, penalise, visually allocate blame with a sticky yellow ticket and generally strike fear and hate into drivers? Should people hide and shy away from traffic wardens and treat them with mistrust or should they be seen as a welcome, integral part of day to day UK living.

Friend or foe? Beauty or beast? Pariah or paragon? 

So what does your Supply Chain team think about your monthly KPI Scorecard discussions within your IBP/S&OP process? Is it a meeting all about blame and backwards looking fault finding and discipline? Or is it what it should be, an open discussion about what needs to be done better by everyone in the current and coming periods?

You certainly must learn the lessons of past shortcomings but applying the learnings to the future is a far more positive and healthy experience for everyone. Supply Chain Analytics can assist you in reaching a much more mature approach to running your business effectively and without people being at each others throats.

Applying a “…don’t look back in anger” approach will lead you and the business to a much more profitable oasis within the market place.

Image courtesy of iosphere at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, KPI, S&OP, Supply Chain Analytics, IBP

Key Performance Indicators or just monthly data dumping? 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Mar 27, 2018

Last month I spent a few weeks enjoying the UK weather disaster as 10mm of snow brought life to a halt. While there I moved the heiress into her new apartment - not a flat now as student days are over, very posh. Hopefully, that will be the last time I have to manage boxes down a narrow and winding staircase and my glass back can get a much needed rest.

Job done, I made my way back to base with an unpleasant 15 hour delay on BlueAir but at least there was no jobsworth amongst the crew.  Despite the weather I continued my minimalist approach to clothing to ease my way through the various security screenings. I wore no belt, no watch, no metal at all in an attempt to glide through the checks without being patted, prodded or made to make a second pass through the metal detector. Unfortunately, my innocent pack of UNO playing cards looks like plastic explosive, apparently.

The end of the world was in progress on arrival back in Bucharest. Heavy dark and angry clouds were dispensing precipitation by the bucket load and it was relentless. The sleet quickly soaked my UK grade Arctic coat and everything underneath including socks.  Futile attempts at shelter included the held-aloft flat newspaper and the rather dangerous shopping bag with eye holes over the head. Even the all in one little black bin bag number a girl was wearing (or was it a dress?) was ineffective in diverting any of the torrential downpour. This was a real storm without escape where complete saturation was guaranteed and inevitable. 

I felt rather like an FMCG CEO. Saturated by data that people believe he/she needs to see in order to run the business. Not actionable information but raw data. Completely submersed in meaningless numbers and perceived trends. Often, that data is aimed at passing the buck to other departments for failure or lack of success or to ensure backside protection during the post-mortem that takes place long after the month or quarter or whatever period has closed.

Even if you do not run a swish ERP you need to be able to address in-market issues while you still have a chance of making a difference. However, to do that you need to receive information which quickly converts to relevant knowledge and then facilitates actions. To actually see the reality of market performance you don’t need masses of numbers, you need facts.

image.pngIf you don’t have a KPI or Balanced Scorecard then sort one out quickly. If you already monitor performance in this way then take a long hard look at what is actually being reported; is it for the benefit of the reporting colleague/department or for the benefit of the entire company?

Remember that KPIs never tell the full story. When a KPI refuses to improve despite all efforts it may well be due to the impact of another completely different and apparently unrelated measure. In such cases you should adopt a Supply Chain Analytics Approach to deep dive into the detail and really see what is happening all along your Supply Chain.

Image courtesy of SupplyVue at Concentra

 

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, CEO, Performance Improvement, Pharma, KPI, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Analytics

A Practical Guide to FMCG SKU Complexity Reduction 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Mar 20, 2018

If your business is struggling to cope with day to day sales while managing innovation and range extensions then give your SKU list a thorough review. Not just a cursory glance but a scientific evaluation of what brings in the profit and what eats at the same. Few businesses are lucky to operate with just one or two monster SKUs but an excessive list of items on the price list can severely affect your customer service performance.

In the customer service link above we looked at the cost to have a single SKU on the books and it is not insignificant when you take all elements of supply into account. If SKUs do not pay for themselves and contribute to the bottom line then why do they exist? SKUs plodding along with low margin AND low sales turnover cannot be worth the cost and effort of maintaining them, can they? They are simply getting in the way of potentially more profitable SKUs.

If you could base your business on high margin/high turnover SKUs then of course you would. Life is not that simple and the market place is ever more competitive so you need to constantly review the wisdom of what you are putting in front of consumers. Unless your business is in dire straits a large proportion of your SKUs will be either low margin/high turnover or vice versa. Both situations can provide reasonably healthy growth but wouldn’t it be better if you could edge them towards the high/high green quartile as per the diagram below?SKU ComplexityThe first step is to make a very rough estimate of what your business spends on keeping an SKU on the price list. This is not an accurate science but you need to put a “stake in the ground” and agree a number, say 30,000Eur. If the margin of a particular SKU does not at least break-even then delisting should be considered. Staff who look after those SKUs in the yellow segments need to be challenged on a quarterly basis to get their SKUs away from the red and towards the green, or delist.

If you carry out such an assessment and find that a majority of your SKUs are in the red segment then you might benefit from a professional spring clean of your portfolio. Such an approach will remove any emotion and bias when clinically assessing what you should be placing on shelves.

Image courtesy of Enchange at Enchange.com.

 

Tags: SKU, FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Pharma, Supply Chain Analytics