Supply Chain Blog

Supply Chain: Goats, Kennedy Brexit & Analytics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Jun 21, 2018

Over the years I have seen many strange sights on various forms of transport. In the Middle East I sat next to a vicious looking falcon on a flight to Bahrain. The falcon was extremely well behaved but then again so was I! In Africa a guy jumped on a tuk-tuk carrying a pig that had ceased to be.

Only last week in Bucuresti a lady brought a goat onto the underground. I guess it could have been a service goat or something similar as guide dogs are still a rarity in Romania. In fact, a guide goat could have some advantages over a dog as it is has its own built-in horn……Also, I wonder if she had to pay to take the goat on board and if so, was it half price for kids?

Whenever you see something dramatic, unusual or out of context you tend to remember that incident or time. People older than myself remember where they where when Kennedy was assassinated. In more recent history I know where I was when Princess Diana died. Only a couple of years ago I remember exactly where I was when I heard the UK had voted to leave the EU. Despite living in an EU country, I and many others where not allowed to vote.

Nobody knew at that time what would happen if UK left the EU – what a basis for a referendum - and that is still the case today although at least the exit remains certain. What will happen to customs tariffs, will UK citizens require visas to reach the sun, will the EU allow right hand drive cars on their road networks? Still nobody knows, and I don’t think anyone will until long after exit happens. However, I will predict a united Ireland, a devolved Scotland (less possibly Wales) and little England in an old tweed suit towing a ferret going cap in hand to join the EU!

Politics and Supply Chain are not common text fellows but in terms of predicting the future they have the same challenges. Hopefully, you make the best decision you can based on the information available and yet you know there is a high probability of getting the outcome completely wrong. If you want to reduce that probability of failure, then you need something over and above your standard ERP IT software.

In the last 10 years, despite investments in sophisticated ERP systems, there are still significant opportunities to improve supply chain performance. Why?

  • Often complex IT packages automate traditional ways of working which results in little improvement or, things are made worse with increased stress in the planning process.
  • The forecast is often blamed – it will never be 100% correct. The issue lies within the supply chain processes, the set-up of the IT and how existing tools are being used.
  • Managing this complexity becomes the real challenge, and to protect themselves, supply chain managers buffer supply chains with cautionary inventory and fat lead-times.

Analytics_supply_chain_forecast_planning

Business planning that puts backside protection as a key priority is destined to failure. Supply Chain Analytics changes the game to make success far more likely and when you take the analytics plunge, you will remember where you where!

Image courtesy of Concentra at Concentra.co.uk

Tags: Dave Jordan, Supply Chain, Forecasting & Demand Planning, Supply Chain Analytics

FMCG Route To Market: Until debt do us part

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jun 20, 2018

What about your company? Do you have great brands and brand awareness, a fantastic extended supply chain, an analytics package, tight financial control, top class HR, the best sales force, innovative marketing? If you tick all these boxes then life must be good, yes? Sadly, not always and some big-name companies frequently get the important distributor relationship badly wrong.

Blue chip companies with internal operational excellence continue to flounder when serving the Traditional Trade, particularly in D&E markets. Admittedly, this trade channel has reduced in importance over the past years but it still accounts for a sizeable portion of markets which are starting to return to growth. International Key Accounts and Local Key Accounts will continue to take share in urban areas but in a country as vast as Romania, for example they will not conquer the rural market in the medium term.

Producers need knowledgeable and reliable Route To Market partners to reach the smaller corner shop outlets and kiosks. There is no shortage of operators willing to be distributors for big name clients but how many of them are really equipped and ready to do the job properly? Producers are often guilty of placing their reputations and ultimately profits, in the hands of enthusiastic amateurs. In the sporting definition, true amateurs do not get paid for their work and distributors do not get paid by producers when they fail to meet targets.

Unfortunately, instead of doing something about the short-comings of distributors, producers proudly celebrate securing penalties or better terms through negotiating against poor performance. What is the point of doing that? Instead of carping on about how terrible are these "partners" why not get out there and help them?

You cannot build houses on sand yet producers expect distributors to swiftly dove-tail into their in-house processes, IT, style, ethics, reporting schedule etc. Yes, they probably exaggerated their capabilities and readiness during the selection pitch but you should be able to see through that or at least be ready to quickly assess capability.

Is it any wonder why so many distributors go under when they are not considered partners and in some cases, are believed to be a hindrance? Distributors do not deliberately make mistakes that lead to their own reduced income. They too are in business to make a few Euros to take home at the end of the month. However, when the penalties add up and the distributor gets into debt, that is when they need producer support and not a kick to the stomach.FMCG_RTM_DISTRIBUTORS_PARTNERSHIPS.jpgProducers need to look closely at the capability matrix offered by their distributors (or more importantly, potential distributors) and in most cases, this will not match up to requirements. Do something about this; build capability where it lacks and you will reap the benefits in having proactive partners going that extra kilometre to make a sale for you. 

Those FMCG producers who are in tune with distributors strengths and weaknesses AND do something about the latter will be in pole position with a Ferrari while less wise competitors are at the back of the grid with a horse and cart. The route to your market can be a lot easier than you are making it!

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

Tags: FMCG, Route to Market, Dave Jordan, Distribution

FMCG Inventory Shrinkage & Control - It's a Dog's Life

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Jun 18, 2018

Do you find yellow dog biscuits stuffed in your window frames? 

Well, I’d expect such occurrences to be as rare as a squirrel with a nut allergy but I find it all the time. Our house has mosquito nets on the windows as our summers are rather hot and the little blighters bite with pure human hatred.  The nets slide up and down between 2 small, vertical brushes on either side of the window to make them impregnable to blood seeking buzzers.

Within these brushes is where I find yellow dog biscuits. Not brown or red or any other colour, only yellow canine munchies. (And while we are on this important subject, if dogs are colour blind why do we give them different coloured biscuits?) You might presume that our half Jack Russell-half Mr. Bean dog Patch is responsible. Is he hiding them away for a sneaky midday or midnight snack? Does he know about some impending global dog chow shortage? I doubt Patch is the culprit as some of these windows are 7 metres off the ground and our dog is yet to work out how to find and climb a ladder and then put the ladder away without me knowing.

FMCG Stock inventory controlSo, how do the biscuits find their way into my window frames? Not surprisingly perhaps, the biscuit thieves are birds; magpies to be precise. I guess they are storing up for a rainy day or winter or some other event. They are known to be attracted by shiny objects but I cannot see the connection with a fairly bland crunchy snack. Also, as Patch eats inside the house they cannot be my/his biscuits so the magpies are stealing them from another poor dog in the area.

The house has many windows so the amount of stolen food is quite high and as I now regularly clear out the stash, the amount really starts to add up.  Some pooch somewhere is not getting his or her full share to eat. That poor dogs’ human probably thinks their poodle is really content and eating well when in fact a magpie is regularly taking the yellow biscuits away. Of course, maybe the poodle doesn’t like the yellow ones. 

Ok Dave, what do we have here and what is this to do with Supply Chain? Let us take a look at what is happening:

1. Supply Chain inventory is not secure as stock shrinkage is occurring on an almost daily basis and yet nobody appears to notice. When did you last see your stock count?

          2. Stock is in the wrong location to serve the needs of the intended customers and consumers. When you have stock in the wrong places you will inevitably develop an overstock in your Producer warehouse network.

          3. Consumer demand is artificially high resulting in over-stocking and unnecessary spend along the Supply Chain.

          4. Ultimately, the final consumer is receiving poor Customer Service.

About the only aspect impressive in this is the quality of the logistics in getting the stolen biscuits from a dog bowl into my window frames. I will keep a look out for any stolen jewellery but I fear I will only have biccies to clear away.

Put simply, if you do not take great care with your own inventory somebody else will!

Image courtesy of bplanet at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: FMCG, Logistica Management, Dave Jordan, Supply Chain, Inventory Management & Stock Control

7 Deadly Sins: Why FMCG Distributors are Overstocked in CEE

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jun 13, 2018

How I guffaw when I hear producers complain about traditional trade distributor overstock.Make no mistake Mr. Producer, YOU put the stock there, oh yes you did! Distributors don't buy stock for something to do or a laugh and a giggle. Excess stock blocks up their warehouses and locks up their cash.

Why does this happen in even the largest companies?

1. Month, quarter and year-end push. "Targets have to be met so push as much stock as possible into the Distributors." This is simply loading and is not real sales.

2. Failed launches. Unrealistic Producer sales objectives leading to slow moving goods which sit in warehouses.

3. Old label stock. Perfectly good stock but the pack with the new artwork is being sold already and nobody wants this "old stuff".

4. Old and expired promotions. Funding support has ended so what do we do with all these left over promo packs? Don't expect sales and marketing colleagues to help.

5. Returns from customers. Still arguing about who is to pay for these returns? You should have had clear SLAs and contract in place.

6. Producer forecasting errors. Nobody wants to lose face at Producer HQ so the stock sits and gathers dust until it expires or is stolen.

7. Damaged and expired. Damages happen, get them written off AND destroyed and get over it. You can avoid expired goods - see above!

Overstocked Distributors

You might think your Distributors have a healthy 21 days of cover but in reality they are operating with a much lower level of saleable stock, ie what consumers actually want to buy.The rest sits in their books and in your stock cover numbers but it contributes nothing to sales. In fact, it negatively affects sales as stock that is in demand is available at too low levels or not at all to meet customer requirements.

"Those distributors have so much stock but my Customer Service level is rubbish".  IT IS NOT A SUPPLY CHAIN PROBLEM!

 

Tags: Dave Jordan, CEE, Traditional Trade, Distribution, Inventory Management & Stock Control

How Spreadsheets Undermine Your FMCG ERP

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Jun 11, 2018

Despite what you may wish to believe the answer is probably, yes. You have invested heavily in brand new ERP software and similarly heavily in some smart, young consultancy people to run the implementation. You will have spent some timing debating and making these choices as the change to an all encompassing and integrated ERP is a huge step and at the same time a huge risk for your company.

Suddenly the flexibility to back-date or correct entries is lost or at least there is a rigid and auditable procedure to follow in order to make any adjustments. Sudden uplifts in Sales cannot be slipped in unnoticed at month-end and neither can supply shortages or marketing tardiness with promotional activity. Everything you do in a good ERP is recorded and can be seen.

ERP System ImplementationIf your ERP really is the only software being used to run your business then a hearty well done to you. However, in a surprisingly large number of companies the all important role of change management has not received the required seniority or focus.  Staff who have been using spreadsheets for maybe 10 - 15 years (it was released in 1985!) cannot and will not stop using them just because they have been trained in a new ERP.  Spreadsheets are like a cuddly teddy at bedtime; they are familiar, comforting, not demanding and always there!

An element of your decision to implement a new ERP was probably a supplier guarantee that people productivity and data accuracy would be improved. In reality you will find staff operating a covert shadow ERP on the same old spreadsheets. Detailed planning, sales and allocation decisions are being made on spreadsheets and then manually inserted into ERPs. Commonly, decisions are taken in isolation of S&OP and lack the consistency that ERP master data brings plus the all important history development for the business baseline.

Staff efficiency and data accuracy have certainly not improved; they have worsened. The tedious “cut and paste” of data into the ERP is time consuming and fraught with error. Post ERP implementation is always a rough time for businesses  as they get to grips with a new way of working but is it any wonder some stay in a continual state of intensive care?

If you pay sufficient attention to change management you can lessen the impact. Should staff not see the medium terms benefits outweighing the short term inconvenience then they will operate the shadow ERP.  The change manager has to clearly show what the ERP brings to people first and subsequently the company – not the other way around.

Of course, one solution might be to deactivate the spread sheet program on the network until ERP discipline is second nature? Now, who is brave enough to do that?

Image courtesy of HikingArtist

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Pharma, ERP/SAP, Supply Chain Analytics, Integrated Business Planning, ERP

Supply Chain Analytics helps international retailer in business turn-around

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Jun 07, 2018

Many will recall that famous Four Yorkshiremen sketch first seen the At Last the 1948 Show and later Monty Python. Four dour characters recall how tough it was when they were younger with each trying to out do the others in a downwards spiral of harshness. While the claims were outrageous and equally ridiculous it had me thinking about how things have changed. If you beamed an 18-year-old back to 1970 what would they see?

  • An analogue telephone attached to a wall with a wire and to call anyone you had to literally dial the numbers with 1 finger using the rotating plastic ring.

  • If you didn’t have a telephone wired into the house you had to put your coat on and walk to a red K6 telephone box, usually in the rain and there’d be a queue. You would need to carry 2p and 10p coins to keep the call active.

  • A television which was probably a black and white model operated by valves housed in a huge rear section. To change channel (there were only 3!) you had to get off your backside, walk across the room and turn a dial, or push a button if you were posh.

  • Need to send someone a message? You did that by writing (possibly typing) on a piece of paper, putting it in an envelope, buying a stamp and popping it in 1 of the red post boxes dotted around.

  • You want to listen to music? Take the black vinyl 7 or 12-inch disk out of the sleeve and place it on the Dansette record player the size of a small suitcase. Manually lift the stylus, place it on the disk and away you go.

I could go on and on and list many examples of life in the pre-digital age. Youngsters today don’t know they’re born!

SUPPLY_CHAIN_ANALYTICS_RETAIL_GLOBALAll of the examples above would also have been used in industry in some form and business has seen equally dramatic changes to how they operate. I will focus only on 1 area here and that is Supply Chain Analytics. No more guessing at how decisions may affect your performance, a good analytics package offers you a virtual crystal ball! Let me take you through a case study.

The Challenge

A well-known international retailer was suffering high levels of inventory in warehouses and in retail outlets plus this stock was the wrong mix for the sales pattern. The company was unable to accurately coordinate the flow of goods from long lead time suppliers to outlets. As a result, expensive emergency air-freighting was used to avoid out of stocks yet, despite this cash draining initiative, working capital was well above target.

The Solution

SupplyVue Analytics reviewed the demand profiles in outlets and at an aggregated level in central warehouses. At outlet-level granularity, the demand was far too sporadic to be forecast, however, at central warehouses, product flow was sufficient to determine a reliable forecast. Analytics demonstrated that a switch to a Kanban pull approach from the central warehouses to outlets would transform inventory levels and eliminate the need for air-freight. In addition, the company implemented a complementary demand-driven replenishment mechanism from central warehouse to multiple suppliers.

The Impact

1. A sustainable 25% reduction in overall inventory levels across a complicated Supply Chain.

2. A deeper understanding of demand profile enabled the company to provide a more predictable and stable signal to suppliers which in turn raised their reliability.

3. Completely eliminated air-freight costs caused by product shortages with an associated increase in Customer Service.

So, progress in this digital age is not all bad and once you have taken a Test Drive or Pilot in Supply Chain Analytics you will wonder how on earth you previously managed. If you need further information please get out your quill and ink write a letter to Enchange!

Image courtesy of photostock at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Dave Jordan, CEO, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics

7 Top Tips for Spare Parts Management in Factories

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Jun 04, 2018

Well, I find it strange anyway. Some very large companies spend countless hours and cash in finding and securing a third party logistic provider (3PLP) to take great care of their finished goods assets. The performance of the chosen 3PLP is then measured and monitored very closely using a suite of KPIs, e.g. damages and losses are recorded and usually debited to the 3PLP under the contract terms. A 3PLP is charged with “storing your stuff” as safely and cost effectively as possible and providing easy picking for dispatch.

I often wonder why some blue chip companies fail to adopt similar warehousing and logistics principles in the operation of in-house engineering stores. Depending on the industry, the value of the components can be several millions of Euros. If you do not pay attention to this area then the same things happen as they do with finished goods warehouses, including:

1. Shrinkage or more accurately, theft! Your spare parts stores will be helping to repair private cars, replenish home tool-boxes and raise personal funds through the sale of stolen goods. This might seem harsh but I have seen it first-hand and continue to in large organisations.

Bottling line resized 6002. Important parts are not in the right place. If you do not have clearly labelled storage bins you can stop production lines very quickly losing valuable operating time. At the end of the day an idle line can probably lead to more lost sales than a badly picked finished goods pallet.

3. Spare parts not replenished. If stock control is not rigorous then you will go out of stock on important items just when you need them. Sod’s Law dictates that they will also be the parts with lengthy lead times.

A few simple principles loaned from big scale warehousing will help:

  1. Operate some sort of stock management system. This can be done on Excel with some discipline but specifically designed software packages are available. You need to know where each spare part is located just like in a finished goods warehouse.
  2. Carry out cycle and annual stock counting. Keep a close eye on your high value and production-critical items by counting them on a rotating basis. Do not wait for a year-end count to reveal a gaping hole in your stock value.
  3. Carry out an ageing analysis. Many large stores are full of spares for machines that were last running when “Shep was a pup”. They are of no use to you yet they sit on a shelf and on your books as working capital. Any materials with specific shelf lives also need regular checking to ensure you are not holding something which is at best useless or at worst dangerous!
  4. Secondary store for critical items. Items of high value or those which will stop production can be held in a “store within a store”, e.g. a wire cage with 2 locks. Access to these items requires a more senior employee to be present at issuance, e.g. maintenance manager.
  5. Operate some relevant KPIs. These do not have to be wide ranging or difficult to calculate, e.g. ageing, stock rotation, shrinkage etc. An important KPI can be the value of your spares as a % of the operation asset value. Do you know yours?
  6. Order and stock only what you need. Avoid the temptation to buy in bulk as the price is keener. If you are able to calculate a forecast plus some safety stock then you can minimise your inventory and your working capital. Also, ensure that spares purchasing and receipt are spilt responsibilities or you may find you are buying items you do not actually use in the factory..………
  7. Restrict access to the spare parts stores. If you allow anyone to wander in and remove items then your stock control will be out of control, no doubt. If you require access to spares on a 24 hour basis then ensure the facility is staffed appropriately at all times. Leaving the stores unmanned and the door open should be a disciplinary offence.

When looking at factory operating efficiency people will often focus only on the production line and RM/PM supply. Take a look at how you manage spare parts and you may be able to influence your level of efficiency from an unexpected source close to home.

Image credit: Hi.WTC

Tags: Logistics Service Provider, Dave Jordan, Manufacturing Footprint, KPI, Logistics Management, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Spare Parts

FMCG Supply Chain: KPI Scorecards - Don’t look back in anger

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, May 30, 2018

UK has been my base for a few days and even in that short time I have started to genuinely think I must now be a different nationality if not from a different planet. When my denim jeans rip at the knees it is time to throw them out.  I do not have a badly drawn and inappropriately placed tattoo. Nothing on me is pierced or decorated with metal, precious or otherwise.

I do not have a preference for Ant or Dec – the “best” UK double act in a sea of tepid TV reality dross? What is Keith Lemon all about? So many TV channels yet so little talent and even less TV shows worth watching. I put litter in waste bins. I still know how to queue. Even my waistline is now considered trim. I own music recordings where the performers wrote the lyrics and play the instruments and don’t get me started on that things like the Kardashians. 

Nevertheless, there is something consistent. Something that has not noticeably changed since I packed my company leaving gift suitcases in 1991 and departed for the Saudi desert. Traffic Wardens.

FMCG_KPI_SCORECARD_SUPPLY_CHAIN.jpgBeing a Traffic Warden is a universally hated career choice and possibly third on the detest list after Tax Inspectors and Bankers these days with Politicians being universally disliked, of course. In the UK wardens patrol the streets looking for vehicles illegally parked even for a short time or even if the front bumper/fender overlaps the authoritative  yellow lines by a few mm.

Why do they exist; the role that is, not the people? What good are they doing for the general public and the fuel duty/road tax cash-cow motorist? Are they here to keep the Queen’s highways, byways and pavements clear of transportation obstacles to allow free flow of vehicles, people and prams? Or, are they here to generate as much revenue as possible for councils and police authorities?

Is their role to gently correct errors, show understanding and guide people on their future behaviour or are they here to discipline, penalise, visually allocate blame with a sticky yellow ticket and generally strike fear and hate into drivers? Should people hide and shy away from traffic wardens and treat them with mistrust or should they be seen as a welcome, integral part of day to day UK living.

Friend or foe? Beauty or beast? Pariah or paragon? 

So what does your Supply Chain team think about your monthly KPI Scorecard discussions within your IBP/S&OP process? Is it a meeting all about blame and backwards looking fault finding and discipline? Or is it what it should be, an open discussion about what needs to be done better by everyone in the current and coming periods?

You certainly must learn the lessons of past shortcomings but applying the learnings to the future is a far more positive and healthy experience for everyone. Supply Chain Analytics can assist you in reaching a much more mature approach to running your business effectively and without people being at each others throats.

Applying a “…don’t look back in anger” approach will lead you and the business to a much more profitable oasis within the market place.

Image courtesy of iosphere at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, KPI, S&OP, Supply Chain Analytics, IBP

An FMCG Success Story; Focus on customers and enjoy the consumer benefits

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, May 28, 2018

Once upon a time there was an FMCG company that I will refer to as “Foresight”. “Foresight” had spent many years and many Euros creating a slick inbound Supply Chain.

  • Top class global, regional and collaborative buying
  • Flexible manufacturing network
  • A state of the art ERP
  • Rigorous S&OP as the key business process

Slick inbound Supply ChainWith all those important boxes ticked they must be successful.....but they were not; not even close. In their peer group they were not number 1, top and bottom line growth was getting harder and harder. Throw in difficult economic conditions and the consumption of their product offering plummeted – double digit style. A large FMCG business and quite a few personal reputations were not looking pretty.

The problem was a surprising lack of focus at the customer end of the Supply Chain. Both International Key Accounts(IKA) and the Traditional Trade (TT) were being poorly serviced.

A lot of hard work upstream was being wasted through inefficiency and actually, ignorance. The situation had existed for a number of years but as the same malaise was common in the industry nobody could see the benefit or indeed the need for “getting ones act together”. “Last amongst equals” was hardly a motivating and compelling business proposition for an international big name.

Seeking external expert assistance “Foresight” started out on an adventure that would change the way they approached business at the customer end of the chain.

Customer Service.   This was something “Foresight” thought it was already good at providing but critical aspects were lacking:

  1. Customer Service responsibilities were fragmented and lacked clear and unambiguous leadership.
  2. “Customer Service personnel” had received no training in the subject - nobody really wanted to take responsibility.
  3. “Customer Service” was actually limited to invoice preparation. Proactive interaction with customers and problem solution were not in job descriptions.

This hardly projected an image of a caring “Foresight” and this was a huge risk considering the increasing power of the retailers…. 

Route To Market (RTM). “This is under control for TT and it seems to work”, however RTM was in the Sales black box and that box needed opening and shaking upside down vigorously!

  1. The Distributor RTM network had been in place for several years and was decaying. “Foresight” salesman interaction with Distributors was far from an open win-win relationship.
  2. Several Distributors were simply incapable and/or ill equipped to represent such a major company. Some actually did not wish to be involved.
  3. “Foresight” did not know on whom they could rely in their network or how large and obvious opportunities could be targeted.

In-house Sales bonuses were linked to sell-in and the remaining steps to the consumer were ignored at “Foresight” level and left in the hands of some indifferent distributors.

The cures were not simple or quick but they were effective and the payback was fast and sustained.

Customer Service Centre“Foresight” now operates a centralised Customer Service department looking after customer needs in a standardised and caring manner. Phone calls are answered by someone who wants to help and the customer is not passed from pillar to post trying to find someone interested in their problem. Retailers now see CS staff face to face as they proactively take steps to understand the needs of both sides of the partnership. The Retailer office was once “sales only” and off bounds to other departments but not now and the benefit is clear and significant.

In RTM, “Foresight” carried out a comprehensive assessment of their distributor network making evaluations of all aspects of each distributor’s organisation. The strengths and weaknesses of each partner are now known and understood. “Foresight” now knows where there is receiver capacity to take more responsibility and a leading role in market deployment. Similarly, they also know to tread carefully with a number of distributors who are struggling financially or simply not equipped to meet expectations. “Foresight's” efforts are now focused on those areas providing maximum opportunity and reward. The “one size fits all” approach has gone and distributors are managed as important partners.

In combination these changes have transformed the business and success has been quick to materialise.  “Foresight” enjoys a leading position in its sector while competitors scrap around trying to find growth that is clearly there but they cannot reach.

For “Foresight” at least, they really are able to live happily ever after!

 

Tags: Customer service, Brewing & Beverages, FMCG, Route to Market, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Distribution

Balanced Scorecard KPIs: Keeping Track of Business Performance 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Mar 29, 2018

How do you keep track of Supply Chain performance within your FMCG, Brewing or Pharmaceutical business? You do, don’t you? If you are not measuring any KPIs then perhaps you should stop here, read this KPI piece and then pop back and carry on.

You can measure and report in many formats as long as you measure appropriate KPIs for your business. One of the most pointless tasks is calculating and reporting a “KPI” which is in fact worthless and of no beneficial interest. Colleagues in Sales & Marketing usually assume they are immune from KPIs as they gleefully sit back and let the Supply Chain guy take the flak at Board meetings. In reality however, the actions of everyone in the company must be reflected in one or more KPIs. If there is anyone in your business who is not impacting a KPI in some way then perhaps you might consider a round of head-count reduction!

The following is a demonstration example of a Balanced Scorecard of business KPIs. While many are indeed Supply Chain related you need only look at Sales Forecast Accuracy to see how other departments can influence that measurement to a far greater extent. KPIs are designed (usually 2 or 3 per discipline) and presented within the company Scorecard.  Target performance threshold levels are agreed (RAG – Red, Amber, Green) and presented monthly within the S&OP process to measure success and target further improvement.

Supply Chain KPIs

There will undoubtedly be more PIs calculated around the business but those in the scorecard really must be the priorities; those that provide actionable information.

The use of simple colour notation allows business managers to see exactly where problems exist allowing them to focus resources. Conversely, you quickly see what is going well and where you might have to raise the bar to maintain and improve further.  (If you are measuring your KPIs at the same level as 5 years ago then that may reflect a business which is stagnating.)

Whatever design you use it does not really matter but:

1. You must measure KPIs relevant to your overall business strategy and performance.

2. You must report them promptly and widely.

3. They must be discussed at the top table, routinely.

4. You must review and delete/insert new KPIs as the business need develops.

5. You must ensure the targets are stretching but achievable as a constant red display is demotivating.

While KPI stands for Key Performance Indicator it could easily be considered as Keep People Interested!

Image courtesy of Enchange.

 

Tags: Brewing & Beverages, FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Pharma, KPI, Supply Chain, S&OP