Supply Chain Blog

Supply Chain, Supply Chain: What’s That All About?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Aug 22, 2018

I started my career as an R&D type who helped bring new FMCG products to the market. Nobody really knew how a product made the transition from bench top and pilot plant testing to the supermarket shelves. Somebody must have been involved somewhere but this was hardly a cohesive team with job descriptions let alone aligned roles and responsibilities. Even then “somebody” was not part of the project team so with hindsight it was inevitable delays and mistakes would occur. “Somebody” was to blame every time!

Supply Chain Small resized 600Supply Chain departments started to spring up in FMCG and Pharma companies as formal organisations around ERP deployment. Recruits were taken from other departments; commercial, manufacturing, sales and even R&D! Very few had any real understanding of Supply Chain requirements and they certainly did not have any formal qualifications or training. Qualifications and training are now widely available through many organisations such as CIPM and the Supply Chain Council.

I am not sure who coined the term Supply Chain though, do you know? I have taken a few Supply Chain definitions from the internet and started with the individual word basics from an Oxford English Dictionary:

Supply noun

1. An amount of something that is available for use when needed.

2. the action of supplying something.

Chain noun

1. A row of metal rings fastened together.

2. a connected series of things e.g. a chain of events.

Seems reasonable but what about a more technical definition taken from the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP)?

 “Supply Chain Management encompasses the planning and management of all activities involved in sourcing and procurement, conversion, and all logistics management activities. Importantly, it also includes coordination and collaboration with channel partners, which can be suppliers, intermediaries, third-party service providers, and customers. In essence, supply chain management integrates supply and demand management within and across companies. Supply Chain Management is an integrating function with primary responsibility for linking major business functions and business processes within and across companies into a cohesive and high-performing business model. It includes all of the logistics management activities noted above, as well as manufacturing operations, and it drives coordination of processes and activities with and across marketing, sales, product design, finance and information technology.”

Wikipedia chips in with “A supply chain is a system of organizations, people, technology, activities, information and resources involved in moving a product or service from supplier to customer. Supply chain activities transform natural resources, raw materials and components into a finished product that is delivered to the end customer. In sophisticated supply chain systems, used products may re-enter the supply chain at any point where residual value is recyclable. Supply chains link value chains.

Who can resist asking the people at the aptly named Supplychaindefinitions.com?

“… the movement of materials as they flow from their source to the end customer. Supply Chain includes purchasing, manufacturing, warehousing, transportation, customer service, demand planning, supply planning and Supply Chain management.  It is made up of the people, activities, information and resources involved in moving a product from its supplier to customer.

Although this Supply Chain definition sounds very simple, effective management of a Supply Chain can be a real challenge.”

Investopedia.com offers up this definition which I particularly like as it highlights Supply Chain as a “crucial process”.

“The network created amongst different companies producing, handling and/or distributing a specific product. Specifically, the supply chain encompasses the steps it takes to get a good or service from the supplier to the customer. Supply chain management is a crucial process for many companies, and many companies strive to have the most optimized supply chain because it usually translates to lower costs for the company. Quite often, many people confuse the term logistics with supply chain. In general, logistics refers to the distribution process within the company whereas the supply chain includes multiple companies such as suppliers, manufacturers, and the retailers.”

Rightly, Supply Chain is now part of every serious company aiming to put a product in front of consumers whether this is FMCG, Pharma, Telecoms etc. However, is it seen as “crucial”? Even today I feel some companies still underestimate the value a “storming” Supply Chain team brings. In some companies Supply Chain does not have a discrete representative at the “top table” and if you delegate Supply Chain management to your Sales Director then you should reconsider that decision and/or pray. One way of ensuring sustainable sales uplift is NOT to report the Supply Chain community into another non-specific, non-skilled company director.
 

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Pharma, Supply Chain, Forecasting & Demand Planning

FMCG cost savings versus sales & marketing budgets!

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Aug 13, 2018

There is your dilemma. You need to save cash towards an expensive year-end holiday but you really do not know the best place from where to take the money. Do you take it from your day to day current account which is already set up to pay the routine monthly bills and invoices? Do you take funds out of an investment account that has not yet actually matured?

In effect, the money in the current account is already committed and the expected appreciation in the investment account is still to be delivered which puts me on my soap box for today’s topic.

When times are tough and cost savings are required why do the senior bods always look to Supply Chain in the first instance? Unlike those colleagues with a fondness for endless agency lunches there is very little discretionary spend to be found in the vast majority of Supply Chain operations. OK, there may be some team building budget, business travel and a small entertainment allowance but where else can you save money?

There is not a lot you can do to have an impact in the short term. What could you do?

1. Negotiate better RM/PM prices? Yes, but this will not filter through to the bottom line very quickly.

2. Increase efficiency in your factories? Yes, but again not likely to hit the balance sheet any time soon.

3. Reduce head count along the Supply Chain? Certainly effective but think about notice periods and compensation obligations and not least the effect on efficiency and reliability.

FMCG Pharma cost savings supply chain resized 600You will have contracts in place for most services with 3 or 4PLPs for warehousing but as long as pallet space utlisation, storage efficiency and shrinkage etc is under control there really are few opportunities and certainly no “low hanging fruit”.

People often rant on about how sales and marketing people are the real stars of any FMCG or Pharma show and without them nothing happens. Think about it, if you do not have any product available to sell it does not matter if you have the best sales pitch or the most memorable TV advert, does it? In simple terms the SC gets the stuff there and S&M might, repeat might, sell it!

Supply Chain people and processes get the product into Traditional Trade and Key Account outlets and how they do it is relatively inflexible in terms of discretionary spend along the way. So when you are looking for savings why do you assume they must come from Supply Chain and not from the huge sales and marketing budgets? The promised client discounts have not yet delivered and the proposed new TV advert is a long way from having an in-market impact.

Certainly, you have to keep control of costs and a rolling annual target is a sensible plan for any business but 2-3% Supply Chain reduction every year is commonly small beer compared with multi-million S&M expenses. Diverting your valuable Supply Chain resources to scrimp and save these small percentages simply takes people off the day to day priority of getting your SKUs onto shelves.

Those Supply Chain “savings” may not actually be money in the bank.

Image courtesy of cooldesign at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, CEO, Pharma, Supply Chain, Traditional Trade, Cost Reduction

10 Top Tips To Tip-Top Customer Service in FMCG, Drinks & Pharma

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Aug 06, 2018

Do FMCG, Drinks & Pharma Companies delude themselves on Customer Service? I think some may well be doing this and may or may not know it! Whatever service related KPI you measure, the KPI is designed to asses how you are performing both internally and at a retailer or outlet level, against peers.

Customer service improvementThere are many ways of measuring the performance including OTIF, CSLM, CCF and CCFOT amongst many others. Essentially you are measuring how much of the right stuff you delivered to the right place at the right time. Importantly, it is not value based – you might measure that internally for monthly progress monitoring and sales bonuses but it is irrelevant for service measures.

Common errors in Customer Service measurement and management:

1. Service should be measured per SKU thus avoiding the possibility of hiding poor performance in one area with exceptional performance in another. Measuring by SKU allows you to hold the right people accountable and ensure resources are appropriately applied.

2. Are you measuring against what the customer ordered or what your team said he could order? This is a common error particularly when order capture is in the hands of staff rewarded via value based sales incentives - “We don’t have that but you can have some extra of this”. You need to see the raw, unconstrained demand from your customers to really understand what they asked for and what they actually received. There is no problem with substituting products with customer agreement as this maintains the relationship and should result in sales but this must be a visible process.

3. Yes, of course the customer may ask for unreasonable amounts of a certain standard SKU or promotion pack but hiding the “data blip” is not the answer. Addressing the issue with some collaborative planning would help both parties. For some reason they asked for a huge shipment; find out why and be more ably prepared to service the demand next time.

4. Use an ERP that automatically allows you to allocate reason codes for service failures and get them investigated promptly. Focus on the big wins using the 80/20 principle; don’t spend too much time finding out why you did not deliver 5 boxes of washing powder and do spend time on the failure to deliver large volumes of high value beauty products.

5. Get your service level on the agenda of the top table in the company. Your service level is a function of every single person in the company and is a reflection of how well you are performing in the market. This means the Marketing guy and the HR guy and others must be involved. Celebrate successes widely and noisily.

6. Do you have a Customer Service department led by a talented individual who is graded as highly as peers within the company? CS is a very important function and it should enjoy equality of importance within the business. Also, CS is not just about taking orders and printing invoices as customers deserve the opportunity to talk to a real human being (avoid answer phones!) about their problems and concerns. Small issues in invoice accuracy which can delay payments of thousands of Euros can be sorted out by knowledgeable and concerned staff motivated to help.

7. Make the CS measure highly visible around the company – everyone should be aware of the overall CS their company is offering to customers. Don’t fall into the trap of accepting low or “sand-bagged” targets – you are likely to achieve them and that gets you precisely nowhere. If you deliver to Retailer platforms you might wish to check where your measure is recorded.

8. Make cross functional visits to customers - they need to see people other than sales reps. Not every day, of course but an annual review with all interested parties present can smooth relationships and assist in times of difficulty.

9. Agree Service Level Agreements to ensure both parties know exactly what is expected as providers or receivers of service. The SLA should contain a few KPIs which allow you to understand the current state and drivers of CS.

10. Celebrate successes both internally and when appropriate, with customers. You need to maintain a rigorous approach to business principles but an above the board dinner does no harm.

Customer Service = Satisfied Customers = Sales = Pay/Bonus = Growth = Satisfied & Retained Staff

 

Tags: Customer service, FMCG, Logistics Service Provider, Dave Jordan, Pharma, KPI, Logistics Management, Brewing & Beverages

FMCG & Pharma: Top 10 Tips for a Tip Top Supply Chain

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Jul 16, 2018

Only a few months into the year and I am hearing the same old complaints about the economy and business being in general ill health. However, there is a new recurring theme which popped up at various parties and gatherings over Easter; “my company doesn't seem to do anything different and just hopes business will improve”. Not going to happen, no way!

FMCG_PHARMA_SUPPLY_CHAIN_TIPSCertainly learning by your mistakes is a powerful message but banging your head against a brick wall for a number years is a rather pointless and painful experience and reflects dire leadership. Those companies that identify failings and shortcomings in their supply chain AND do something about them will be best prepared to beat the competition.

Based on client feedback and impact analysis of “before and after” performance I list our top 10 tips to tip top Supply Chain performance. 

  1. Route To Market – Has the march of the International Key Accounts stalled? Traditional Trade Distributors may still be a large chunk of your business and they are capable of scratching out growth but only if you support them. Give your RTM a thorough service and your Distributors will serve you better.
  2. Sales & Operational Planning - If this is in place and working well, great but there is no doubt you could improve it. If there is no S&OP you should use it! If you are not yet a believer of S&OP check out “What has S&OP ever done for us?".
  3. Reduced Inventory – Why not give your sales a boost with some unexpected and low cost support using stock that will be otherwise written off? I detect numerous companies “encouraged” stock into the trade for year end and only the residual stock disposal companies will benefit if stock gets too close to expiry.
  4. SKU Complexity – When did you last study your complexity? Do you have any idea what complexity is doing to your business? Understand your sku complexity and check if it appropriate for your business.
  5. Improved Customer Service – A number of major global companies still do not measure CS to any degree of accuracy or honesty.  Companies that fool themselves on Customer Service rarely succeed.
  6. Proactive 3PLP’s – Are they meeting the agreed KPI’s? If they are then perhaps you need to review them and revise targets upwards, again and again.
  7. Sales & Marketing Buy-in – This is still a problem, I fear. If only everyone in your company was aligned to the same volume/value plan and 100% mutually supportive. Think what sort of competitive edge that would provide.
  8. Use the ERP - Avoid uncontrolled spreadsheets like the plague! They undermine your business and waste time and effort. If you are considering a fresh implementation of an ERP then chose a partner with experience in the field. I mean real operational experience and not bought-in fresh out of university, suited “experts”.
  9. Continuously Improve – If you are in the same position in 12 months time then you will be dropping towards the back of the pack and will be ill equipped to compete. Keep innovating and improving your Supply Chain.
  10. Supply Chain Awareness – A very important tip top number 10. There is more to supply chain than trucks and sheds - for the uninitiated this is what Supply Chain is all about.

Check out the top 5 as a priority and then seek an expert partner to lead you through the process of change in the next 5. Don’t be in the same position this time next year; do something!

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Route to Market, Logistics Service Provider, Dave Jordan, CEO, Performance Improvement, Pharma, KPI, Traditional Trade, S&OP, Cost Reduction

FMCG ERP and The Beatles.......? Spreadsheets cause damage.

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jul 04, 2018

Some time ago I wrote about the way spreadsheets were undermining expensively assembled ERP’s in FMCG, Brewing and Pharmaceutical companies. They still are, by the way.

Not too long ago a paper on Public Debt and Austerity published by 2 eminent Harvard Professors was found to contain errors in the Excel coding. Several significant countries were excluded from the data analysis and therefore the conclusions could not be accurate.

The glitch was spotted by a student who like everyone else, believed he and not the professors must be wrong. If you can make mistakes at this level then think what may be happening in your demand planning office. A decimal point in the wrong place or a misplaced cell could lead to market place challenges in stock availability or indeed, excess.Beatles_ERP_Spreadsheets

The bug in that Public Debt spreadsheet leads me to the Beatles – what a segue! Here is what Lennon & McCartney might have written about spreadsheets and ERPs.

Yesterday, an IT man took my Excel away
Now I have to plan a different way

How I wish it was yesterday

Certainly, I’m not as comfortable as I used to be
There's a new ERP in front of me.
How yesterday came shockingly

Why Excel had to go I don't know, IT wouldn’t say
Did I plan something wrong? How I long for the Excel way.

Yesterday, spreadsheet planning was the only way
Now I need to learn a different way
I need to believe in our ERP

Why Excel had to go I don't know, IT wouldn’t say
Did I plan something wrong? How I long for the Excel way.

Yesterday, poor planning was the only way
Error riddled spreadsheets everyday
Now I don’t believe in yesterday
Mm mm mm mm mm mm mm

You can catch up with the classic Beatles track by clicking here.

If you do not run an ERP that relegates spreadsheets to useful and reliable supporting tools then you are risking poor planning in your business.  If you are running an ERP you might check exactly where the data comes from, where critical calculations are really made and how secure is the information.

Image courtesy of artur84 at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: Dave Jordan, CEO, Pharma, ERP/SAP, Supply Chain, Forecasting & Demand Planning, ERP

How Spreadsheets Undermine Your FMCG ERP

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Jun 11, 2018

Despite what you may wish to believe the answer is probably, yes. You have invested heavily in brand new ERP software and similarly heavily in some smart, young consultancy people to run the implementation. You will have spent some timing debating and making these choices as the change to an all encompassing and integrated ERP is a huge step and at the same time a huge risk for your company.

Suddenly the flexibility to back-date or correct entries is lost or at least there is a rigid and auditable procedure to follow in order to make any adjustments. Sudden uplifts in Sales cannot be slipped in unnoticed at month-end and neither can supply shortages or marketing tardiness with promotional activity. Everything you do in a good ERP is recorded and can be seen.

ERP System ImplementationIf your ERP really is the only software being used to run your business then a hearty well done to you. However, in a surprisingly large number of companies the all important role of change management has not received the required seniority or focus.  Staff who have been using spreadsheets for maybe 10 - 15 years (it was released in 1985!) cannot and will not stop using them just because they have been trained in a new ERP.  Spreadsheets are like a cuddly teddy at bedtime; they are familiar, comforting, not demanding and always there!

An element of your decision to implement a new ERP was probably a supplier guarantee that people productivity and data accuracy would be improved. In reality you will find staff operating a covert shadow ERP on the same old spreadsheets. Detailed planning, sales and allocation decisions are being made on spreadsheets and then manually inserted into ERPs. Commonly, decisions are taken in isolation of S&OP and lack the consistency that ERP master data brings plus the all important history development for the business baseline.

Staff efficiency and data accuracy have certainly not improved; they have worsened. The tedious “cut and paste” of data into the ERP is time consuming and fraught with error. Post ERP implementation is always a rough time for businesses  as they get to grips with a new way of working but is it any wonder some stay in a continual state of intensive care?

If you pay sufficient attention to change management you can lessen the impact. Should staff not see the medium terms benefits outweighing the short term inconvenience then they will operate the shadow ERP.  The change manager has to clearly show what the ERP brings to people first and subsequently the company – not the other way around.

Of course, one solution might be to deactivate the spread sheet program on the network until ERP discipline is second nature? Now, who is brave enough to do that?

Image courtesy of HikingArtist

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Pharma, ERP/SAP, Integrated Business Planning, Supply Chain Analytics, ERP

Balanced Scorecard KPIs: Keeping Track of Business Performance 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Mar 29, 2018

How do you keep track of Supply Chain performance within your FMCG, Brewing or Pharmaceutical business? You do, don’t you? If you are not measuring any KPIs then perhaps you should stop here, read this KPI piece and then pop back and carry on.

You can measure and report in many formats as long as you measure appropriate KPIs for your business. One of the most pointless tasks is calculating and reporting a “KPI” which is in fact worthless and of no beneficial interest. Colleagues in Sales & Marketing usually assume they are immune from KPIs as they gleefully sit back and let the Supply Chain guy take the flak at Board meetings. In reality however, the actions of everyone in the company must be reflected in one or more KPIs. If there is anyone in your business who is not impacting a KPI in some way then perhaps you might consider a round of head-count reduction!

The following is a demonstration example of a Balanced Scorecard of business KPIs. While many are indeed Supply Chain related you need only look at Sales Forecast Accuracy to see how other departments can influence that measurement to a far greater extent. KPIs are designed (usually 2 or 3 per discipline) and presented within the company Scorecard.  Target performance threshold levels are agreed (RAG – Red, Amber, Green) and presented monthly within the S&OP process to measure success and target further improvement.

Supply Chain KPIs

There will undoubtedly be more PIs calculated around the business but those in the scorecard really must be the priorities; those that provide actionable information.

The use of simple colour notation allows business managers to see exactly where problems exist allowing them to focus resources. Conversely, you quickly see what is going well and where you might have to raise the bar to maintain and improve further.  (If you are measuring your KPIs at the same level as 5 years ago then that may reflect a business which is stagnating.)

Whatever design you use it does not really matter but:

1. You must measure KPIs relevant to your overall business strategy and performance.

2. You must report them promptly and widely.

3. They must be discussed at the top table, routinely.

4. You must review and delete/insert new KPIs as the business need develops.

5. You must ensure the targets are stretching but achievable as a constant red display is demotivating.

While KPI stands for Key Performance Indicator it could easily be considered as Keep People Interested!

Image courtesy of Enchange.

 

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Pharma, KPI, S&OP, Brewing & Beverages, Supply Chain

Key Performance Indicators or just monthly data dumping? 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Mar 27, 2018

Last month I spent a few weeks enjoying the UK weather disaster as 10mm of snow brought life to a halt. While there I moved the heiress into her new apartment - not a flat now as student days are over, very posh. Hopefully, that will be the last time I have to manage boxes down a narrow and winding staircase and my glass back can get a much needed rest.

Job done, I made my way back to base with an unpleasant 15 hour delay on BlueAir but at least there was no jobsworth amongst the crew.  Despite the weather I continued my minimalist approach to clothing to ease my way through the various security screenings. I wore no belt, no watch, no metal at all in an attempt to glide through the checks without being patted, prodded or made to make a second pass through the metal detector. Unfortunately, my innocent pack of UNO playing cards looks like plastic explosive, apparently.

The end of the world was in progress on arrival back in Bucharest. Heavy dark and angry clouds were dispensing precipitation by the bucket load and it was relentless. The sleet quickly soaked my UK grade Arctic coat and everything underneath including socks.  Futile attempts at shelter included the held-aloft flat newspaper and the rather dangerous shopping bag with eye holes over the head. Even the all in one little black bin bag number a girl was wearing (or was it a dress?) was ineffective in diverting any of the torrential downpour. This was a real storm without escape where complete saturation was guaranteed and inevitable. 

I felt rather like an FMCG CEO. Saturated by data that people believe he/she needs to see in order to run the business. Not actionable information but raw data. Completely submersed in meaningless numbers and perceived trends. Often, that data is aimed at passing the buck to other departments for failure or lack of success or to ensure backside protection during the post-mortem that takes place long after the month or quarter or whatever period has closed.

Even if you do not run a swish ERP you need to be able to address in-market issues while you still have a chance of making a difference. However, to do that you need to receive information which quickly converts to relevant knowledge and then facilitates actions. To actually see the reality of market performance you don’t need masses of numbers, you need facts.

image.pngIf you don’t have a KPI or Balanced Scorecard then sort one out quickly. If you already monitor performance in this way then take a long hard look at what is actually being reported; is it for the benefit of the reporting colleague/department or for the benefit of the entire company?

Remember that KPIs never tell the full story. When a KPI refuses to improve despite all efforts it may well be due to the impact of another completely different and apparently unrelated measure. In such cases you should adopt a Supply Chain Analytics Approach to deep dive into the detail and really see what is happening all along your Supply Chain.

Image courtesy of SupplyVue at Concentra

 

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, CEO, Performance Improvement, KPI, Supply Chain, Pharma, Supply Chain Analytics

Time to Spring Clean your Supply Chain in FMCG?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Mar 22, 2018

Are market conditions getting any better, really? Many big name companies are heading for indifferent full year 2017 results and all caution about the continuing “difficult market conditions”. Ok, so 2017 has been put to bed but many will be paying the price for the mammoth last quarter efforts which must have made the advertising and promotional agencies extremely wealthy. I wonder what a snap-shot of bottom line profitability looked like over the final 3 months of 2017?

If the economy is not much better than last year what exactly can you do differently to keep ahead of your competitors in 2018?  If you had all the time in the world you could apply all of the Top 10 New Year Supply Chain Resolutions. You might not have the time and resources to tackle all of them but there are a couple you can take advantage of for some quick wins. Give your Supply Chain a much needed Spring Clean (I know, it is snowing heavily as I type this in Bucuresti) and see the difference this can make.

Most businesses will have carried out a stock count at year end. You do count your stock don’t you? If you don’t then I suspect you will have less inventory than you thought! You should now have a clear list of those items which are clearly overstocked, close to expiry, old label etc. Every day you keep hold of this stock destroys value as the expense slowly but surely chips away at your bottom line making your life unnecessarily difficult. Get rid of it! Give it to charity. You could even sell it! If you clear out your stocks you will naturally create a slightly more responsive and faster Supply Chain that focusses on value creating SKUs.

FMCG_SKU_COMPLEXITY_REDUCTION_SPRING_CLEAN.jpgDo you know how many “must have” core and promotional SKUs you added in 2017 in order to get as close as possible to top down HQ targets? In difficult times it is easy for processes and procedures to be overlooked in the search for ever more sales. Every SKU costs you money even if it may be  difficult to quantify in your business. 

Do all of the SKUs actually contribute to profit? If you do not monitor profitability by SKU then a considerable proportion may exist for little or worse still, negative benefit. You need to be dispassionate about culling SKUs that are not performing. As far as possible you should keep Sales and Marketing out of that decision making process until your business case is water-tight. Otherwise, these colleagues will always come up with a reason why XYZ SKU is critical to the future of the universe!

Each of these initiatives is relatively straightforward and certainly not resource intensive. Carrying out this simple Spring Clean and getting your house in good order will help you focus your efforts on winning in the market place.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: SKU, FMCG, Dave Jordan, Pharma, Inventory Management & Stock Control

A Practical Guide to FMCG SKU Complexity Reduction 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Mar 20, 2018

If your business is struggling to cope with day to day sales while managing innovation and range extensions then give your SKU list a thorough review. Not just a cursory glance but a scientific evaluation of what brings in the profit and what eats at the same. Few businesses are lucky to operate with just one or two monster SKUs but an excessive list of items on the price list can severely affect your customer service performance.

In the customer service link above we looked at the cost to have a single SKU on the books and it is not insignificant when you take all elements of supply into account. If SKUs do not pay for themselves and contribute to the bottom line then why do they exist? SKUs plodding along with low margin AND low sales turnover cannot be worth the cost and effort of maintaining them, can they? They are simply getting in the way of potentially more profitable SKUs.

If you could base your business on high margin/high turnover SKUs then of course you would. Life is not that simple and the market place is ever more competitive so you need to constantly review the wisdom of what you are putting in front of consumers. Unless your business is in dire straits a large proportion of your SKUs will be either low margin/high turnover or vice versa. Both situations can provide reasonably healthy growth but wouldn’t it be better if you could edge them towards the high/high green quartile as per the diagram below?SKU ComplexityThe first step is to make a very rough estimate of what your business spends on keeping an SKU on the price list. This is not an accurate science but you need to put a “stake in the ground” and agree a number, say 30,000Eur. If the margin of a particular SKU does not at least break-even then delisting should be considered. Staff who look after those SKUs in the yellow segments need to be challenged on a quarterly basis to get their SKUs away from the red and towards the green, or delist.

If you carry out such an assessment and find that a majority of your SKUs are in the red segment then you might benefit from a professional spring clean of your portfolio. Such an approach will remove any emotion and bias when clinically assessing what you should be placing on shelves.

Image courtesy of Enchange at Enchange.com.

 

Tags: SKU, FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Pharma, Supply Chain Analytics