Supply Chain Blog

The Right Data and Metrics are Vital for FMCG Route to Market Success

Posted by Ross Marie on Thu, Nov 29, 2018

For a successful Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) Route to Market Strategy, we must be able to measure our performance across the market, internally within the company and externally against the competition and wider benchmarks. For example, we must be able to measure our own sales performance, our brand/SKU distribution, our new product introductions, our volume, our revenue, our share, our displays, our in-store facings, our pricing and promotion performance, etc.

essential data and metrics for rtm strategy successWe must be able to do this by territory, by area/region, nationally, by channel, by sub-channel, by key account, by distributor, by retail group, etc. We then need the ability to easily compare these measured results against our targets, our competition and any other benchmarks. We must have the functionality to do this historically, against the current performance and against future targets.

The goal here from a RtM standpoint is to get as detailed, reliable and up to the minute information as possible, to allow us to take corrective action against problems or to recognise success as early as possible to spread it far and wide.

Welcome to my blog series on the 20 Steps to Route to Market Excellence model. Some of you reading this may have gone to ‘Mr Google’ for some help. What I am trying to do here is to point you in the right direction to create an amazing RtM strategy.

Over the past number of weeks, we have gone through the first 9 steps of my model. The focus of this post is Step 10, ‘Data & Metrics’.

Here are some examples of questions you can ask under Step 10 – Data & Metrics:

  1. Based on the RtM Review in Step 1, what is the data that is currently available to us?
  2. What are the performance measures that we are currently measuring against?
  3. What are our current data requirements, in absolute terms and in terms of data capture and maintenance?
  4. Based on the RtM strategy we have chosen what are the likely future data requirements?
  5. To what extent are there any specific areas we need to measure based on external factors (e.g. wider organisation requirements, legislation, regulations, brand launches, restructures, etc.)
  6. Do we currently receive data from our distributors, our retailers, our key accounts, any other customers or partners? What is the data – e.g. sales, stock, etc. If we do, what are we doing with it? If not, is this possible in the future? Have we tried to get it in the past?
  7. Is the data that we will look to measure currently available in the marketplace? Do we need to pay for it? Do we have it internally within our own systems?
  8. If we do not have the data available, will we be able to use a third party to provide it?
  9. Do we currently measure our levels of display, facings or adherence to planograms in the market? How do we do this? How effective it the measurement and our adherence?
  10. Do we have an existing Revenue Management Model? If so, what does it measure? Does our model capture the difference between pricing, mix and volume changes?
  11. Do you have volume that is moving from the traditional trade to the organised trade and eroding margins? Does our Revenue Management Model capture this?
  12. Are our Trade Discounts out-pacing our sales growth? To what extent are we capturing this?
  13. Do we have a cross functional approach to revenue management? Are sales, supply chain, marketing, trade marketing all involved in the process? Are we feeding this information into the correct departments for action?
  14. Which department controls pricing and promotions in our organisation? Is it part of the RtM function and how will it be measured, and the information captured?
  15. Is the current Revenue Management Model fit for purpose? If not, what might a new model look like?
  16. What systems are we using to measure all of this and keep track of performance? Do we have an infield CRM or hand held linked to a back-office system? Can we generate reports with ease or do we have information on spreadsheets? Do we have a system to consolidate this data and information? To what extent are we reliant on spreadsheets for this?
  17. What are the actions that need to take place to have these KPIs measured?
  18. Do we have access to external KPIs, either from the wider organisation or from our marketplace, so that we can benchmark our local activities?
  19. What are the agreed data requirements and set of KPIs that we will capture to measure the success of the RtM strategy going forward?
  20. What is our agreed Revenue Management Model?

I hope you find this useful, any views and comments are welcome. Next week I will cover Step 11 ‘Sales Incentive Program’. Please subscribe to the blog on this page, to ensure you don’t miss the latest updates on RtM excellence in execution and the 20 Steps model. If you would like to know more about the 20 Steps click here.

Tags: 20 Steps to RtM Excellence, RtM Strategy, Ross Marie, RTM, Retail, ERP, Promotions, Information, RTM Assessment Tool, Distribution, Sales, Traditional Trade, FMCG, Route to Market, ERP/SAP, SKU

First-Class FMCG Territory Planning is Crucial in RtM Strategy for Sales Growth

Posted by Ross Marie on Thu, Nov 15, 2018

Territory Planning for Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) companies is about dividing up a piece of geography into different subsets, based on certain criteria, usually geographic proximity. It allows FMCG companies to effectively and efficiently service their customers, whilst allowing the organisation to target specific resources at each individual territory.

territory-planning-4 (002)Territory planning saves time and money by avoiding overlaps where more than one resource from the same company tries to service or sell to the same client. It also helps to ensure that all outlets within a specific geography get covered, by assigning management of a territory to one resource. It facilitates local knowledge capture, new outlet openings, closures, understanding competitor activity, capturing consumer and other trends, to name a few. Territory Planning also allows the assignment, measurement and management of Route to Market targets (volume, share, brand distribution, display, range, POS material placement, etc.).

One of the key elements of Territory Planning is simplicity. For example, pick a piece of geography, maybe a city in a state, a district in a country, or one small island out of many, and then assign one TM&D rep to manage and be responsible for that Territory and all the outlets in it. If you need to also assign additional resources like Telesales Reps, Merchandisers, Sales Promoters, Channel Managers, Key Account Managers, and Telemarketing Reps, etc., be careful who carries the overall responsibility. Any territory needs overall management.

Here are some examples of questions you can ask under Step 8 – Territory Planning:

  1. What is the DIME Approach (Direct, Indirect, Mix & Everything in between) in your Market? What does that mean for territory planning? Which outlets do we cover, and which outlets are covered by indirect channels?
  2. Do you have an influence on the territories of your indirect channel? Can you increase your influence? Are these distributors fully cooperative partners? Are they exclusive?
  3. Based on the RtM approach that we are taking, are we looking to take on new distributors or replace existing ones, and what impact will that have on our territory planning?
  4. Are there any existing sales territories in place? Have they been reviewed as part of Step 1 in the 20 Steps to RtM Excellence? If so, what are the results?
  5. Based on the review of the current territory map, what are the key areas for improvement? How would these improvement areas translate into new or revamped territories?
  6. Are there any specific issues that we need to be aware of when reviewing the territories, whether internal (regional, resources, launches, etc.) or external (competitive actions, distributors, government/political, etc)?
  7. How does the local geography impact on forming territories?
  8. Are there specific infrastructure constraints that we need to be aware of?
  9. Are there any existing external geographical factors that would potentially shape any territory formation? Is the geography split into islands, into counties, into districts, into regions, via postcodes, etc?
  10. Are we reviewing or designing territories for field force members who will call to retail outlets (sales reps, TM&D reps, merchandisers, sales promotion, etc.) and/or will there also be territories for back office support and remote activities (telemarketing, telesales, customer service, etc.) or for a combination of both?
  11. Which resource will be assigned to overall territory management? Who will be accountable? Will Key Account or Channel Managers have some or a joint responsibility for certain outlets across territories?
  12. Are we looking to cover the entire geography or are we looking to target specific cities or population concentrations, or volume levels, or other criteria, or a combination of these?
  13. Based on the results of the outlet and channel classification, what impact is there on my current territory map?
  14. How would a potential new territory map look with the required resources to service the outlets?
  15. What would the call frequencies for each outlet look like across the territories and what are the target calls per day?
  16. Are there different activities that need to be assigned to different call frequencies? If so, what are they?
  17. Given the above, have we accurately defined the size, scope and geography of each of our territories?

My goal here is to get leaders in the Route to Market environment thinking about all the elements involved in RtM strategy, one of my key messages is to keep it simple, but we still need the detail.

This post is part of my blog series on the 20 Steps to Route to Market Excellence model. This post focuses on Step 8 ‘Territory Planning’. You can read about the previous steps here. I hope you find this useful, and I welcome any views and comments below.

Next week I will cover Step 9 ‘RtM Structure’. Please subscribe to the blog on this page, to ensure you don’t miss the latest updates on RtM excellence in execution and the 20 Steps model. If you would like to know more about the 20 Steps click here.

Tags: 20 Steps to RtM Excellence, RtM Strategy, Ross Marie, RTM, Retail, Information, Distribution, Sales, Route to Market, FMCG, Brewing & Beverages

UK NHS Supply Chain: bed-busting benefits of patient SKUs

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jun 29, 2016

Some time ago I looked at the often dreadful customer service offered by FMCG and Telecoms companies in CEE. Of course, this avoidable malaise is not restricted to that part of the world. After being in UK for a few weeks I have experienced really poor service from organisations you would think had top notch, high performing supply chains.

The Royal Mail and all those “black and white cat” types will be the subject of a later blog but first in line for critique is the National Health Service.

The NHS in the UK is a precious gem and really is the envy of most other countries where credit cards have to be produced before you hear the Marigold’s snap on. The NHS is supported by a seriously complex, unpredictable and volatile supply chain. On this occasion supply chain certainly includes the provision of medical supplies, equipment, foods to multiple locations around a hospital site. (I am tempted to bang on about the quality food or to be more exact, the amount of wasted food as most of what I see is not going to win any awards.)

My bone of contention with NHS service is about beds, the availability of which is a constant battle which is seemingly never won. Operations are regularly postponed when there are no beds available for post-op recuperation. Yes, some beds are certainly blocked by long term patient residents but my observations suggest there are actually many beds woefully under utilised. To alleviate the problem, I am certainly not suggesting bed sharing which does occur elsewhere. (I have personally seen a single bed with 4 occupants at the same time in a certain country.)

While it is important patients are treated with the utmost dignity and with the best care in the world I think NHS bed availability would be improved if patients were considered as SKU’s on a supermarket shelf. Just take the emotion away for a moment and consider how this might work.

Each bed is shelf in a shop and the optimum situation is to see all these shelf locations full and more importantly, replenished as soon as stock (patients) moves off the shelves (beds). As with transferring stock from the Lidl back of store to gondola ends, this should not be rocket science. And quite right too as long as decisions are made in the optimum sequence and information is in full flow.

Admittedly based on my massive sample of 1 hospital, I see the following sequence of activities:

  1. NHS_SUPPLY_CHAIN_BED_PLANNING.jpg1. Patient gets ready to leave and sits in a chair waiting for discharge.
  2. 2. Nothing happens at the bed.
  3. 3. A patient leaves the bed and is discharged.
  4. 4. Nothing happens at the bed.
  5. 5. The bed is stripped and all cups, jugs etc. are removed.
  6. 6. Nothing happens at the bed.
  7. 7. Bed and surrounding area are cleaned and the bed re-made.
  8. 8. Nothing happens at the bed.
  9. 9. Eventually, a new patient arrives to fill the bed but this can be several hours and often overnight, after the vacancy was first identified.

Just a little bit of basic demand and supply forecasting plus timely information transfer would see a far higher utilisation of available bed space and over the period of a year, noticeably shorter waiting times.

Ok, so I know little about the intricacies of the NHS and maybe other hospitals are slicker in their bed allocation but I feel it is a huge opportunity. A change in mindset and a willingness to learn from other supply chains could prove invaluable. I did offer my services to look at this acute bed shortage problem and was welcomed as long as I had previous experience of working within the NHS…….

Isn’t that the problem? If you are not open to new ideas and innovative solutions, you will get nowhere while the NHS wastes money on incestuous internal studies and reviews. Remember Einstein, who probably did have good knowledge of rocket science; “Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”

Image courtesy of Suriya Kankliang at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: SKU, FMCG, Dave Jordan, Forecasting & Demand Planning, IT, Information