Supply Chain Blog

Supply Chain: Goats, Kennedy Brexit & Analytics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Jun 21, 2018

Over the years I have seen many strange sights on various forms of transport. In the Middle East I sat next to a vicious looking falcon on a flight to Bahrain. The falcon was extremely well behaved but then again so was I! In Africa a guy jumped on a tuk-tuk carrying a pig that had ceased to be.

Only last week in Bucuresti a lady brought a goat onto the underground. I guess it could have been a service goat or something similar as guide dogs are still a rarity in Romania. In fact, a guide goat could have some advantages over a dog as it is has its own built-in horn……Also, I wonder if she had to pay to take the goat on board and if so, was it half price for kids?

Whenever you see something dramatic, unusual or out of context you tend to remember that incident or time. People older than myself remember where they where when Kennedy was assassinated. In more recent history I know where I was when Princess Diana died. Only a couple of years ago I remember exactly where I was when I heard the UK had voted to leave the EU. Despite living in an EU country, I and many others where not allowed to vote.

Nobody knew at that time what would happen if UK left the EU – what a basis for a referendum - and that is still the case today although at least the exit remains certain. What will happen to customs tariffs, will UK citizens require visas to reach the sun, will the EU allow right hand drive cars on their road networks? Still nobody knows, and I don’t think anyone will until long after exit happens. However, I will predict a united Ireland, a devolved Scotland (less possibly Wales) and little England in an old tweed suit towing a ferret going cap in hand to join the EU!

Politics and Supply Chain are not common text fellows but in terms of predicting the future they have the same challenges. Hopefully, you make the best decision you can based on the information available and yet you know there is a high probability of getting the outcome completely wrong. If you want to reduce that probability of failure, then you need something over and above your standard ERP IT software.

In the last 10 years, despite investments in sophisticated ERP systems, there are still significant opportunities to improve supply chain performance. Why?

  • Often complex IT packages automate traditional ways of working which results in little improvement or, things are made worse with increased stress in the planning process.
  • The forecast is often blamed – it will never be 100% correct. The issue lies within the supply chain processes, the set-up of the IT and how existing tools are being used.
  • Managing this complexity becomes the real challenge, and to protect themselves, supply chain managers buffer supply chains with cautionary inventory and fat lead-times.

Analytics_supply_chain_forecast_planning

Business planning that puts backside protection as a key priority is destined to failure. Supply Chain Analytics changes the game to make success far more likely and when you take the analytics plunge, you will remember where you where!

Image courtesy of Concentra at Concentra.co.uk

Tags: Dave Jordan, Supply Chain, Forecasting & Demand Planning, Supply Chain Analytics

FMCG Inventory Shrinkage & Control - It's a Dog's Life

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Jun 18, 2018

Do you find yellow dog biscuits stuffed in your window frames? 

Well, I’d expect such occurrences to be as rare as a squirrel with a nut allergy but I find it all the time. Our house has mosquito nets on the windows as our summers are rather hot and the little blighters bite with pure human hatred.  The nets slide up and down between 2 small, vertical brushes on either side of the window to make them impregnable to blood seeking buzzers.

Within these brushes is where I find yellow dog biscuits. Not brown or red or any other colour, only yellow canine munchies. (And while we are on this important subject, if dogs are colour blind why do we give them different coloured biscuits?) You might presume that our half Jack Russell-half Mr. Bean dog Patch is responsible. Is he hiding them away for a sneaky midday or midnight snack? Does he know about some impending global dog chow shortage? I doubt Patch is the culprit as some of these windows are 7 metres off the ground and our dog is yet to work out how to find and climb a ladder and then put the ladder away without me knowing.

FMCG Stock inventory controlSo, how do the biscuits find their way into my window frames? Not surprisingly perhaps, the biscuit thieves are birds; magpies to be precise. I guess they are storing up for a rainy day or winter or some other event. They are known to be attracted by shiny objects but I cannot see the connection with a fairly bland crunchy snack. Also, as Patch eats inside the house they cannot be my/his biscuits so the magpies are stealing them from another poor dog in the area.

The house has many windows so the amount of stolen food is quite high and as I now regularly clear out the stash, the amount really starts to add up.  Some pooch somewhere is not getting his or her full share to eat. That poor dogs’ human probably thinks their poodle is really content and eating well when in fact a magpie is regularly taking the yellow biscuits away. Of course, maybe the poodle doesn’t like the yellow ones. 

Ok Dave, what do we have here and what is this to do with Supply Chain? Let us take a look at what is happening:

1. Supply Chain inventory is not secure as stock shrinkage is occurring on an almost daily basis and yet nobody appears to notice. When did you last see your stock count?

          2. Stock is in the wrong location to serve the needs of the intended customers and consumers. When you have stock in the wrong places you will inevitably develop an overstock in your Producer warehouse network.

          3. Consumer demand is artificially high resulting in over-stocking and unnecessary spend along the Supply Chain.

          4. Ultimately, the final consumer is receiving poor Customer Service.

About the only aspect impressive in this is the quality of the logistics in getting the stolen biscuits from a dog bowl into my window frames. I will keep a look out for any stolen jewellery but I fear I will only have biccies to clear away.

Put simply, if you do not take great care with your own inventory somebody else will!

Image courtesy of bplanet at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: FMCG, Logistica Management, Dave Jordan, Supply Chain, Inventory Management & Stock Control

Supply Chain Analytics smooths production planning AND reduces inventory?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Jun 14, 2018

May Day falling on a Tuesday meant a rare 4 day “weekend” break was enjoyed and the sun shone, in Romania at least. Time to dust off the BBQ for the first time this year and chill in the late April heat. We had some Romanian bred ostrich meat to grill – yes, honestly and what’s more the Romanian word for Ostrich is the perfectly apt Strut!

Everything was rather last-minute, but the salad was done, bread buns cut and buttered, potatoes wrapped in foil were ready and the Prosecco had already popped. Man dons apron with a life size image of a girl in a bikini plus a Knorr chef hat and we are ready to roll.

Well, we would be ready to roll if we had any charcoal!

SUPPLY_CHAIN_ANALYTICS_INVENTORY_PRODUCTION_PLANNINGI guess I could have popped out to the garage to pick a bag up but it ruins the flow of things and anyway I was Prosecco’d up. To a background of female tutting we resorted to another process and turned the gas on in the kitchen.

I only had 6 items to plan but goofed with one of the most important but the absence of any would have scuppered the day. Our last-minute change of plan was not dramatic but we used expensive gas rather than charcoal. This minor domestic challenge shows how unexpected shortages can impact on otherwise smooth processes.

Putting the strut steaks aside let us look at a case study where materials more critical than charcoal were causing problems and how Supply Chain Analytics played their part.

The Challenge

Despite having relatively predictable demand and high stock levels, an FMCG manufacturer still suffered stock-outs of different RM/PM and had to change production plans and schedules constantly to try and maintain service levels. As a result, operating costs were unnecessarily high, and the day-to-day running of the supply chain was absorbing a disproportionate amount of management time due to fire-fighting. Staff morale was dipping – much like mine on Sunday afternoon!

The Solution

SupplyVue took a detailed analytical look at the production sequence using the line changeover matrix and demand plan. This work sought to create the lowest cost manufacturing sequence and a set of “Golden Rules” to maximise efficiency. Using this optimum sequence, SupplyVue used production wheel methodology to create a rolling 16-week production plan. Scenarios were generated showing the trade-offs between manufacturing cost, manning and inventory levels, and between levelling capacity and inventory. In doing this, the management team was able to decide on the production policies that most aligned to their business objectives and specifically, Customer Service.

The Impact

1. A 15% reduction in changeover time through an optimised production wheel approach.

2. Levelled demand to prevent overtime and disrupting shift patterns.

3. Inventory levels plummeted through reduced cycle times and increased conformance to plan.

Supply Chain Analytics would not have saved my BBQ or my ear from a bashing, but you need something with high powered deep data diving capability to understand what is really going on in your supply chain.

Image courtesy of Peter Orseved at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Supply Chain, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, Production Planning

Balanced Scorecard KPIs: Keeping Track of Business Performance 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Mar 29, 2018

How do you keep track of Supply Chain performance within your FMCG, Brewing or Pharmaceutical business? You do, don’t you? If you are not measuring any KPIs then perhaps you should stop here, read this KPI piece and then pop back and carry on.

You can measure and report in many formats as long as you measure appropriate KPIs for your business. One of the most pointless tasks is calculating and reporting a “KPI” which is in fact worthless and of no beneficial interest. Colleagues in Sales & Marketing usually assume they are immune from KPIs as they gleefully sit back and let the Supply Chain guy take the flak at Board meetings. In reality however, the actions of everyone in the company must be reflected in one or more KPIs. If there is anyone in your business who is not impacting a KPI in some way then perhaps you might consider a round of head-count reduction!

The following is a demonstration example of a Balanced Scorecard of business KPIs. While many are indeed Supply Chain related you need only look at Sales Forecast Accuracy to see how other departments can influence that measurement to a far greater extent. KPIs are designed (usually 2 or 3 per discipline) and presented within the company Scorecard.  Target performance threshold levels are agreed (RAG – Red, Amber, Green) and presented monthly within the S&OP process to measure success and target further improvement.

Supply Chain KPIs

There will undoubtedly be more PIs calculated around the business but those in the scorecard really must be the priorities; those that provide actionable information.

The use of simple colour notation allows business managers to see exactly where problems exist allowing them to focus resources. Conversely, you quickly see what is going well and where you might have to raise the bar to maintain and improve further.  (If you are measuring your KPIs at the same level as 5 years ago then that may reflect a business which is stagnating.)

Whatever design you use it does not really matter but:

1. You must measure KPIs relevant to your overall business strategy and performance.

2. You must report them promptly and widely.

3. They must be discussed at the top table, routinely.

4. You must review and delete/insert new KPIs as the business need develops.

5. You must ensure the targets are stretching but achievable as a constant red display is demotivating.

While KPI stands for Key Performance Indicator it could easily be considered as Keep People Interested!

Image courtesy of Enchange.

 

Tags: Brewing & Beverages, FMCG, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Pharma, KPI, Supply Chain, S&OP

Key Performance Indicators or just monthly data dumping? 

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Mar 27, 2018

Last month I spent a few weeks enjoying the UK weather disaster as 10mm of snow brought life to a halt. While there I moved the heiress into her new apartment - not a flat now as student days are over, very posh. Hopefully, that will be the last time I have to manage boxes down a narrow and winding staircase and my glass back can get a much needed rest.

Job done, I made my way back to base with an unpleasant 15 hour delay on BlueAir but at least there was no jobsworth amongst the crew.  Despite the weather I continued my minimalist approach to clothing to ease my way through the various security screenings. I wore no belt, no watch, no metal at all in an attempt to glide through the checks without being patted, prodded or made to make a second pass through the metal detector. Unfortunately, my innocent pack of UNO playing cards looks like plastic explosive, apparently.

The end of the world was in progress on arrival back in Bucharest. Heavy dark and angry clouds were dispensing precipitation by the bucket load and it was relentless. The sleet quickly soaked my UK grade Arctic coat and everything underneath including socks.  Futile attempts at shelter included the held-aloft flat newspaper and the rather dangerous shopping bag with eye holes over the head. Even the all in one little black bin bag number a girl was wearing (or was it a dress?) was ineffective in diverting any of the torrential downpour. This was a real storm without escape where complete saturation was guaranteed and inevitable. 

I felt rather like an FMCG CEO. Saturated by data that people believe he/she needs to see in order to run the business. Not actionable information but raw data. Completely submersed in meaningless numbers and perceived trends. Often, that data is aimed at passing the buck to other departments for failure or lack of success or to ensure backside protection during the post-mortem that takes place long after the month or quarter or whatever period has closed.

Even if you do not run a swish ERP you need to be able to address in-market issues while you still have a chance of making a difference. However, to do that you need to receive information which quickly converts to relevant knowledge and then facilitates actions. To actually see the reality of market performance you don’t need masses of numbers, you need facts.

image.pngIf you don’t have a KPI or Balanced Scorecard then sort one out quickly. If you already monitor performance in this way then take a long hard look at what is actually being reported; is it for the benefit of the reporting colleague/department or for the benefit of the entire company?

Remember that KPIs never tell the full story. When a KPI refuses to improve despite all efforts it may well be due to the impact of another completely different and apparently unrelated measure. In such cases you should adopt a Supply Chain Analytics Approach to deep dive into the detail and really see what is happening all along your Supply Chain.

Image courtesy of SupplyVue at Concentra

 

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, CEO, Performance Improvement, Pharma, KPI, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Analytics

Supply Chain Improvement via Analytics - well worth a closer look!

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Mar 14, 2018

Just when we thought winter had been and gone it bit back nastily with a short, sharp shock of bad weather including snow and bitter cold. Typically, UK was unable to cope and as an example I spent 5 hours looking out of a cabin window at Birmingham airport while 10mm of snow gently fell. Eventually I arrived back in Bucharest to find significantly more snow yet very little disruption, as usual.

What else is hitting the headlines at the moment? POTUS Donald Trump thinks it’s a good idea to tackle the problem of gun attacks in schools by arming teachers. Is your cuppa too sweet? Of course, add more sugar. Waistline too big? Eat more food. Everybody except POTUS and the NRA considers introducing more guns to schools is a bad idea.

On the business front, February is over in its usual short, yet sweet way and we are now well into March as the end of the first quarter for many companies draws near. Your ability to make an impact on the Q1 results is slowly vanishing and if you are short at the top or bottom then you should still resist the urge to push stocks into the trade.

Just as arming maths teachers is plain daft, pushing more stock into the trade is similarly unwise yet it remains a go-to solution for some. As bad as this is, what is worse is that it is highly likely you already have too much inventory dotted along the chain. From a planning manager perspective this is about just in case rather than just in time!

A few questions to honestly ask yourself:Supply_chain_analytics_inventory_control_&_reduction.jpg

  • Do you know the precise stock level that will deliver your target service levels and in market sales?
  • Do you know what you need to change to achieve your supply chain and ultimate business targets?
  • Do you genuinely understand what is happening inside your own supply chain?

Like those mustachioed David Bedford money lending look-alikes, you are not alone.

In the last 10 years or so, despite investments in sophisticated ERP and other supporting systems, huge opportunities to further improve supply chain performance have become available.

Why should you be interested in Supply Chain Analytics? It’s………

  • Free: An initial free test drive on a sample of your data will indicate the potential benefits.
  • Fast:  A proven step by step data loading process from your existing source systems.  You don’t have to wait for a lengthy IT implementation to benefit from Supply Chain Analytics.
  • Instant: The software is pre-built with analytics reports, calculations, trends and data collation capability.
  • Accessible: A secure cloud-based platform with access from your PC, tablet or mobile.
  • Profitable: You are weeks away from starting the process of saving millions of Euros AND reaching those ambitious sales targets.

Don’t be frightened by Supply Chain Analytics; they are the future leading towards your Supply Chain excellence. A selection of stunning case studies will be published shortly. Take a look and then get involved.

Image courtesy of Loveluck at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Pharma, Supply Chain, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics

FMCG Supply Chain: Chaff innovation, is it worth it?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Feb 07, 2018

By the end of February over 19% of the year will be behind you. Think about that for a minute. If you follow a financial calendar year you probably put your Annual Plan to bed in October and now nearly 20% of the available selling time has already gone. Shocker!

How would you describe progress so far? Pick a phrase:

Steady progress in a challenging environment.

Defending share under concerted competitor pressure.

Starting to deliver anticipated operational improvements.

Bottom line erosion due to conversion rates.

Sales dip on change in consumer behaviour.

Excuses, excuses, excuses!

FMCG_SUPPLY_CHAIN_INNOVATION_GROWTH.jpgCertainly, there are many, many reasons why performance is not up to expectation and not everyone in a particular sector can achieve their objectives. Unless you are creating new demand, there is only 1 pie for you and your competitors to feast upon. What’s up your sleeve could be innovation.

After the mad rush to end last year and kick off 2018 now is a great time to review your innovation programme. In the same way in-market activation planning should reach far into the future, your innovation funnel should be planned on at least a 12-month rolling basis and longer depending on your specific lead times.

So, do you have some big bold innovations on which your annual plan was designed? Something that competitors do not have? Perhaps your boffins in white coats have come up with a new ingredient or chemical combo that really does make colours brighter and whites whiter. Being able to bring something genuinely new to consumers is a marketing and sales dream to drive growth.

Or is your ‘innovation’ simply another round of at best cosmetic refreshment and at worse, not really innovation at all? If your funnel is packed full of chaff you may not understand how this can adversely affect your supply chain. Here are just a few examples of chaff innovation which probably cause more damage to the business than what is generated in return.

  1. A new label for a bottle.
  2. ‘New & Improved’ when the new formulation is a cost saving tweak.
  3. A salami job on your SKU, e.g. the incredible shrinking chocolate bars.
  4. Economy packs which need a degree in mathematics to understand the offering.
  5. X% extra free and BOGOF.

Don’t get me wrong, you do need to do some of this type of stuff but don’t kid yourself you are innovating.

Many companies fill up their innovation funnels with events which are activities rather than growth generating innovation. Don’t do it! Activities rightfully have a place in your business model, but it is important to understand the impact these have on your business. Each activity requires resources to be deployed across all functions to get the SKU in front of consumers. Is the benefit of the activity really paying back when you consider the cost and time expended?

Look at the dictionary definitions and bear these in mind when you are next presented with an innovation funnel update.

Innovation:  the introduction of new things, ideas, or ways of doing something

Activity: a thing that you do for interest or pleasure, or to achieve a particular aim

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles atfreedigitalphotos.net

 

 

 

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, CEO, Supply Chain, INNOVATION

Santa & Opening Presents - Christmas S&OP For Parents

Posted by Dave Jordan on Fri, Dec 15, 2017

“Dashing through the snow
In a one horse open sleigh…”

How many of you started to sing then? Yes, the festive period is fast approaching and the biggest and best supply chain in the world is almost ready to activate. This is always the most efficient supply hain whatever those nice chaps at Gartner may say.

There is no way Santa Claus could achieve his annual success without sticking rigidly to an S&OP process, i.e. Santa & Opening Presents.

The process starts every year on the 26th December just as children start to play with the empty packaging instead of their much sought after gifts. Their engorged parents lounge sleepily in front of the television watching The Great Escape or Jason & the Argonauts – again! The loyal Elves are given their end of season bonus and packed off back to Eleveden Forest in Suffolk. Didn’t you know that is where they live for most of the year?

Before January is over those lovely people who design toys and games quickly introduce new and more exiting models which will become must-haves for countless girls and boys. Toy shops are visited and millions of children quietly note those presents they would like Santa to bring them the following. The demand slowly builds until it is time to bring the Elves back from Suffolk on the eleventh day of the eleventh month – no coincidence there! The first job for the Elves is to get the huge Christmas factory ready to run once again.

santas_sop_planning_cycle_small.jpg

In parallel with this, millions of children around the world unzip their pencil cases with a purpose. Using their best handwriting they tell Santa they have all been well behaved this year and then  list all the presents they would like to receive. This accumulated unconstrained demand allows the Elf factory to start fixing production plans to meet a deadline that is set in stone. Is there a more peakier peak period?

Money does not grow on trees so “Santa” must quickly check what can be afforded from the budget. Remember, the wish lists are always too long and you do not want 100% Customer Service  – keep “em hungry”, I say. The Pre-S&OP takes place with all stakeholders involved to ensure everything is ready to go. You want to avoid stock-outs just as much as you need to avoid expensive write-offs.

After necessary adjustments are made to the planned volumes by SKU, the final S&OP takes place. Bearded Santa is fully dressed in his best red uniform and takes his seat. If Pre-S&OP actions have not been carried out, then there is unlikely to be much “Yo Ho Ho-ing”. Fortunately, everyone is in agreement and the final set of child and associated gift numbers is rubber-stamped. Everyone involved in the Christmas S&OP must operate on the same set of numbers or somebody will be disappointed.

The big day comes and Rudolph leads the reindeers in pulling the delivery sleigh across the world in a complex logistical challenge. Santa makes sure all the presents are delivered on time before little heads lift from pillows to wake parents at 4am! (Well, I did.)

 “Dashing through the snow
In a one horse open sleigh
O'er the fields we go
Laughing all the way
Bells on bob tails ring
Making spirits bright
What fun it is to laugh and sing
A sleighing song tonight”

Before you know it, there we are again on 26th December and the same robust and reliable S&OP cycle starts once more. See you next year Santa Baby!

Image courtesy of Enchange Ltd at Enchange.com

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: Christmas, Humour, Supply Chain, S&OP, Logistics Management, Inventory Management & Stock Control

An FMCG Distributor Is For Life & Not Just For Christmas

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Dec 14, 2017

Ok, so you are unlikley to see this on a car bumper sticker but FMCG Distributors will have a significant impact on your sales performance, probably your variable pay bonus and therefore your CEO aspirations! How have you treated your Distributors this year? Were they the usual pain in the proverbial - failing to achieve targets, not paying on time, always moaning about trading terms? Of course, some Distributors do fit this stereotype but others are keenly trying to be treated as and to be, equal partners in your business success. But do you see this?

How are things going in Q4? Have you fallen into the trap of the “sales bonus push”? Year end stock clearance FMCG Breaking all the supply and sales phasing rules you have been trying to drum into Distributors? Did you strictly maintain discipline on Sales & Operational Planning or did the last quarter deteriorate into a “sell whatever we've got in the warehouse” scenario?

Companies that spend time and effort in proactively guiding their Distributors, providing relevant training and support inevitably succeed in the market place. Yes, at the end of the day Distributors have to stand on their own two feet but so many FMCG companies assume an organisation calling itself an “FMCG Distributor” inherently knows how to properly support any specific business.

If you do not pay attention to the Traditional Trade (TT) distribution side of your business then you are asking for trouble and that trouble usually ends in divorce along with all the discontinuity baggage separation brings. You need to avoid your choice of Distributors becoming like the English Premier League where managers get about 5 minutes to make an impact before being shown the door. (Strange though, that all these football managerial failures usually find another highly paid role; the latest being Big Sam Allardyce)

So, as we approach a special time of the year why not think about your Distributors and ask yourself if you have given them a fair crack of the whip?  If not, then you might consider a New Year resolution to develop a strategy for mutual success. This is far better than continually highlighting deficiencies and using backward looking, discipline focussed KPIs to bash them on the head.

Sit down with your RTM Distributors regularly, evaluate their strengths and weaknesses and agree to do something about the latter. Simply running through a Route To Market evaluation together can work wonders in establishing trust and cooperation. Do yourself a favour and do this now before Q1 next year also becomes history that you cannot change.

Click on the RTM link below and go!

CTA RTM Free Download resized 600

Image courtesy of stock.xchnge at freeimages.com

Tags: FMCG, Route to Market, Dave Jordan, CEO, Performance Improvement, Supply Chain, S&OP, Distribution

FMCG: I’m a Supply Chain expert…Get me out of here!

Posted by Dave Jordan on Sun, Dec 03, 2017

The definition of celebrity is a famous person, VIP, very important person, personality, name, big name, famous name, household name, star, superstar, celebutante, leading light, giant, great, master, guru. In that case why do I only know 3 people from the 2017 series? One boxer, a footballer with an ironic surname and Boris Johnson’s father. I don’t know Mr Johnson either, but he helped produce Boris the buffoon so probably deserves to endure a degree of hardship.

I guess I have lived outside the Brexit zone too long and simply do not appreciate the celebrity importance of this collection of egos but some of these people are obscure. If they are stars or household names, then surely everyone will get a go at being handsomely paid to eat crocodile tongues on holiday down-under. My turn must come!

What’s more the show is being presented by the best UK double act since Morecambe and Wise……UK TV is becoming a veritable talent vacuum.

FMCG_CONSULTING_TALENT_HUB_INTERIM

Dare I say it, but a similar dynamic is emerging in the world of supply chain consulting. With business media site like LinkedIn being unregulated you can add whatever you wish to your profile and work history. Unless someone notices a blatant fabrication and takes the time to suggest a text correction, this becomes the accepted reality where the term “expert” is overused. I even recall one LinkedIn member set his status as “Current Company: Unilever – Position: Owner”!

Another definition for you; expert - having or involving a great deal of knowledge or skill in a particular area. That level is not achieved easily or in a few years and being employed for many years in supply chain does not mean you can simply switch to become a credible consultant. From personal experience making that change after almost a lifetime in an FMCG multinational (no, I wasn’t the owner either) is not easy.

There are 2 important elements to being a successful consultant after working on the other side of the fence. Real and deep expert knowledge is a given but the task of imparting that to often cautious or even suspicious clients is the difficult part of the job. When you work in industry you have the authority of your work level or job title which make things happen. When consulting you have diddly-squat authority and making things happen and stay happened is a tough new skill to learn.

When you are in the market for consultancy expertise you must carry out some degree of due diligence. Check out and corroborate the claims of past success with particular focus on how expertise was deployed in the receiving organisations.

Don’t be taken in by the “expert” moniker and use something like the Talent Hub to find out who is availableand what they have actually achieved in the wonderful world of consulting.

It's a jungle out there!

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net  

 

Tags: FMCG, Interim Management, Supply Chain, CONSULTING