Supply Chain Blog

Supply Chain: The benefits of Interim Management

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Mar 29, 2017

Interim SC Expert at Hand Netsize resized 600Interim Management is an approach used by companies to “make things happen” within a clear budget and without the headaches of recruiting a full time employee (FTE).  The benefits are numerous but initially……

Immediate access to expert supply chain skills and experience in your sector.

No hidden extras. You pay the daily fee rate and expenses; no more, no less.

Training for your staff to ensure supply chain knowledge and skills imparted and retained.

Experienced supply chain interim managers available now at all levels of seniority.

Remove internal hurdles and barriers to change.

International experience gained from working in many countries, companies and in relevant sectors.

Motivated to achieve results to tight time and cost objectives.

Maintain the resource while you need it without any financial burden at contract end.

Avoid permanent employee costs which are significant.

No inconvenient holidays, training courses or conferences.

Ability to challenge your supply chain status quo and make sustainable change in the business.

Generate savings and efficiency improvements in a short timescale.

Expectations should high be as you are buying international expertise.

Make your business prepared for the competition in difficult economies.

Excellent return on investment.

No political axe to grind and no bias; straightforward advice and actions.

Take a look at the Enchange approach to Interim Management, eave your details via the contact form and we will call you back. If you are not sure you need Interim Management then you probably do!

Tags: FMCG, Interim Management, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Pharma, Supply Chain, CEE

An FMCG Distributor Is For Life: Not Just For Christmas

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Dec 21, 2016

Ok, so you are unlikley to see this on a car bumper sticker but FMCG Distributors will have a significant impact on your sales performance, probably your variable pay bonus and therefore your CEO aspirations! How have you treated your Distributors this year? Were they the usual pain in the proverbial - failing to achieve targets, not paying on time, always moaning about trading terms? Of course, some Distributors do fit this stereotype but others are keenly trying to be treated as and to be, equal partners in your business success. But do you see this?

How are things going in Q4? Have you fallen into the trap of the “sales bonus push”? Year end stock clearance FMCG Breaking all the supply and sales phasing rules you have been trying to drum into Distributors? Did you strictly maintain discipline on Sales & Operational Planning or did the last quarter deteriorate into a “sell whatever we've got in the warehouse” scenario?

Companies that spend time and effort in proactively guiding their Distributors, providing relevant training and support inevitably succeed in the market place. Yes, at the end of the day Distributors have to stand on their own two feet but so many FMCG companies assume an organisation calling itself an “FMCG Distributor” inherently knows how to properly support any specific business.

If you do not pay attention to the Traditional Trade (TT) distribution side of your business then you are asking for trouble and that trouble usually ends in divorce along with all the discontinuity baggage separation brings. You need to avoid your choice of Distributors becoming like the English Premier League where managers get about 5 minutes to make an impact before being shown the door. (Strange though, that all these football managerial failures usually find another highly paid role.)

So, as we approach a special time of the year why not think about your Distributors and ask yourself if you have given them a fair crack of the whip?  If not, then you might consider a New Year resolution to develop a strategy for mutual success. This is far better than continually highlighting deficiencies and using backward looking, discipline focussed KPIs to bash them on the head.

Sit down with your RTM Distributors regularly, evaluate their strengths and weaknesses and agree to do something about the latter. Simply running through a Route To Market evaluation together can work wonders in establishing trust and cooperation. Do yourself a favour and do this now before Q1 next year also becomes history.

Click on the RTM link below and go!

CTA RTM Free Download resized 600

Image courtesy of stock.xchnge at freeimages.com

Tags: FMCG, Route to Market, Dave Jordan, CEO, Performance Improvement, Supply Chain, S&OP, Distribution

FMCG CEO 2016 Letter to Santa Claus (aka Father Christmas)

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Dec 20, 2016

FMCG/Brewing/Pharma CEO Letter to Santa ClausDear Santa,

I have been a very good FMCG CEO this year, I promise. If you want, you can check with my shareholders. They know how good I have been this year. Apart from the out of stocks of course, oh and the little mistake when we had to write stock off and waste lots of our money. But that is not so bad is it? Other CEOs were naughty last year and they still got what they wanted from you.

I had better be honest because you will know if I am not telling the truth. We also had a problem starting S&OP and so our planning, forecast accuracy and sales were not very good. They were not really big problems so I hope you can forget about them this time, please. Next year I promise to do better, I do, honest.

I forgot about the Route To Market (RTM) mess we had in the peak sales months but that really was not my fault. I also promise to do something about RTM next year and make sure it works properly so people who buy our products are not disappointed again. I know it is bad when people come to buy our products and then spend their money on something else. I will talk to our distributors and Enchange and find out what we need to do.

I know, I know, when the new ERP computer system was switched on we were not really ready for the change but we did make it better as fast as possible. I did not think we needed any outside help for the new IT but I admit I was wrong. Next time I will get it right, hopefully without having any lost sales.

The factory thing was not my fault, I think. The factory man promised me lots of product but his machines kept breaking down at the wrong times and we had to wait for the fixing men to arrive. They took ages to get the machines working again and then they broke down again and again. No, it is not a very reliable factory, yet.

Does the warehouse problem count against me as well? We could not find our products when we wanted them and then when we did find them they were old and out of date and of no use. This was very sad but it will not happen again next year, I hope.

I have just read my message again to make sure I did not spell any words wrong and I see I was not as good as I thought. Actually, after reading this I am going to the chimney to take my stocking down and put it away in the Christmas storage box. I will try again next year, Santa.

Bye bye and Happy Christmas.

CEO FMCG

Image credit: HikingArtist.com

Tags: Route to Market, Christmas, Logistics Service Provider, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Performance Improvement, Traditional Trade, S&OP, Sales, Inventory Management & Stock Control

The Twelve Days of Supply Chain 2016

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Dec 19, 2016

On the first day of Christmas, 12 days of SC Xmas  Small2 copy resized 600
Enchange gave to me 
A robust S&OP. 

On the second day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the third day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the fourth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the fifth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the sixth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
A suite of KPI’s 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the seventh day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s,
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics, 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the eighth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
The RTM Tool, 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the ninth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the tenth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Great Customer Service,
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the eleventh day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Integrated Supply Chain, 
Great Customer Service, 
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the twelfth day of Christmas,                                                                          Enchange gave to me
APO Implementation
Integrated Supply Chain, 
Great Customer Service, 
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

Have you got your breath back? Finally, we wish you a very Merry Christmas and an increasinly prosperous New Year!

Image courtesy of Nora Ashbee at Enchange.com

Other seasonal posts:

Tags: Christmas, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Performance Improvement, Supply Chain, S&OP, Forecasting & Demand Planning

Supply Chain – regular IT to Supply Chain Analytics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Aug 11, 2016

I am an App-free zone. I have to admit I am not a big App fan but at least I now know what an App is after a lengthy period of ignorant denial. Originally used only by cutting edge, bearded techies (sorry Steve), Apps have become a major part of routine as life seems to revolve around getting more out of mobile phones.

Some of these telephones are more powerful than desktop PC’s and the cameras are certainly as good as mid-range stand-alone versions. In fact, why is a mobile phone called a telephone anymore? The functionality is such a long way from the house brick sized “hand” sets you see on old shows like The Sweeney that another moniker seems appropriate.

Supply_Chain_Analytics_FMCG_PLANNING_PHARMA_IT.jpgWe do not call a modern car a wheel simply because that’s what started things rolling in that technology, do we? Nor do we call our curved, slimline HDTVs cathode ray tubes. Find a new name people!

Apps in industry and supply chain in particular tend to be rather larger in size and far more expensive but do they all do what it says on the tin? Largely, yes.

  • ERPs do bring a high degree of rigour, data collation and transactional integrity to complicated manufacturing and distributive supply chains.
  • WMS systems do provide you with inventory control, performance measurement and stock surety as a basis for excellent customer service.
  • DRP helps you plan the efficient distribution of your finished product.
  • TRP works to ensure your stock is on the move to clients in good time and with efficient fuel and time consumption.
  • APO can certainly help a company improve planning across the extended supply chain.

These and more apps or IT packages are certainly good news for people running complicated regional or global supply chains. While they all have a value and a role to play there is something they do not provide. 

Despite spending millions of Euros in sophisticated and not so sophisticated systems, are there any significant new opportunities to improve supply chain performance? Yes, and here is why:

  • All those increasingly complex IT-led projects have automated ways of working whether they are optimum or not. Generally, this provides incremental improvement at best and with significantly increased variability and caution in the planning processes.
  • The sales forecast is often blamed as the cause of whatever problem is current. In reality the issue lies within the supply chain processes, the set-up of the IT and/or how the various tools are being used in parallel and in tandem.
  • Managing this never ending supply chain complexity becomes the real challenge. Faced with this complexity and increasing uncertainty, planners buffer their supply chains with inventory and lead-times. Inventory becomes that large eared elephant in the room. Everyone knows it reduces free cash and adds unnecessary cost but nobody knows exactly what to do about it and even fewer are brave enough to propose anything.

There really is nothing positive about unnecessary inventory in the supply chain.

The answer? What is needed is better and more accessible data analysis to drive decision making across the supply chain and not in one stand-alone sub function. Decisions need to be taken based on facts and without the emotion or gut feel that is often the default motivation for immediate action.  This is where the App and half that is Supply Chain Analytics can contribute to your business success.

SC Analytics Apps or IT can sit above your existing transactional IT to overcome these challenges and help you ensure all the individual sub-functions are working seamlessly and synergistically. You do not write off your existing systems or put them in a box on a shelf; they all have a major part to play but they would benefit from supply chain analytics help.

Thinking about it, the term “supply chain” actually does reflect the reality for companies yet to operate with some sort of Supply Chain Analytics. Think of a heavy stainless steel chain draped across the desk. Yes, all the functions are indeed joined together but some links are not fully aligned, some lie at odd angles and overlap with others while others are stretched out and only just connect at the extremes. Doesn’t that sound like something that can be further improved?

Maybe the supply chain should actually be the “supply artery” without all the spatial confusion of a chain. The artery would continually supply the precise amount of product required at any time to any location as demand dictates and taking all environmental factors into account. Now, that is an App I would buy!

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Performance Improvement, ERP/SAP, Forecasting & Demand Planning, Supply Chain Analytics

Postman Pat, Postman Pat, Postman Pat & his Supply Chain hat

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jul 06, 2016

I recently peeped outside of the FMCG and Pharmaceutical world and took a look at the amount of empty beds in the National Health Service in UK and how a little alternative thinking plus basic demand and supply planning expertise could improve bed utilisation. Today it is the turn of the Royal Mail and all those “black and white cat” postie types to be in line for my critique. 

Before you say that the Royal Mail is not a proper supply chain, it is a supply chain and a very complicated one at that. Apart from the reducing but still significant Christmas card peak, this is a business that cannot really forecast how many letters and parcels will be dropped into Post Offices and Post Boxes for delivery on a daily basis. Or perhaps they can or should? Is it any different from the daunting, daily, dynamic demand volatility experienced in Tesco, Asda and Aldi etc.?

Anyway, that is not the issue on this occasion but it is about the Royal Mail redirection service which should be a very straightforward formality. You move to a new address and pay the Royal Mail to keep an eye on your letters and parcels and forward them to your new abode. This is not as simple as it sounds as finding that gas bill in a plain brown envelope must be very close to searching for a needle in a haystack. Nevertheless, they have been doing this for ages and in large numbers so should be very proficient.

FMCG_MAIL_POSTAL_SUPPLY_CHAIN_SERVICE.jpgNot this time. They got it horribly wrong from day one and continued to do so as even “signed for” mail which must be capable of automatic sorting was sent to the old address. Luckily we are still in the locality and in contact with the remaining Neanderthal student residents who in their few conscious periods send vowel-free texts letting us know Postman Pat has left something in the heiress’s name. Before they have the chance to eat or smoke what has arrived we quickly pop down and rescue items that slipped through the redirect net. That net must have holes the size of Ronaldo’s ego.

After repeated telephone calls and emails and the release of only a minor amount of my pent up frustration from afar, Postman Pat has refunded all costs and is now carrying out the service – very efficiently now, incidentally – free of charge. What a waste of time, energy and other resources!

I have no idea what the inside of a sorting office looks like or what processes and procedures are in place or their daily challenges but failure to carry out core advertised service is very disappointing. Delivering enveloped and packaged mail is what they do best; if they cannot get that right then what chance do they have with other value added services?

Walk into a pub on a scorching day (ok, so that is not going to be in UK) to be told sorry, no beer. Step into a supermarket to find no bread, milk, tea or cheese! Pull up at the McDonalds drive-in to be told no fries today - actually no bad thing!

You have to get the basics right or your credibility with existing and potential new clients is severely limited. Some organisations bend over backwards to gain new business and rightly so but why don’t they bend further backwards to keep that business? In FMCG and Pharma I find business retention is far harder than finding it in the first place.

Image courtesy of Ohmega1982 at freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

Tags: Customer service, FMCG, Performance Improvement, Pharma, Forecasting & Demand Planning

FMCG & Shakespeare? Macbeth S&OP Soliloquy

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Apr 25, 2016

As we one again celebrate St George's Day and the 400th birthday of William Shakespeare (also the date he died, coincidentally) what would the great bard think about Sales & Operational Planning (S&OP) in FMCG businesses? Let us take a look......

S&OP ala Shakespeare

Is this a plan which I see before me, 
The numbers are as we planned? Come, let me see.
They are not, I see two numbers, still.
Art thou not following S&OP, incredible!
Your “gut feeling” could be right? or is this but
A plan of the sales mind, a false creation,
Proceeding from the bonus-obsessed brain?
I see this yet, inform others
As this which you cannot ignore.
Thou shall assure me S&OP gets going;
And the S&OP instrument I want used!
Mine eyes see the foolish lack o' consensus,
Or else worthless at best; I see this ill,
And on thy supply plan remove doubts of “could”,
Which was not so before. There's no such thing:
It is the demand plan which conforms
Thus to mine eyes. I must see minutes recorded
Pre-SOP must go ahead, and ERP is in use.
The gaps could be deep; discussion eliminates
Take extra offerings, and work even harder,
Align by this meeting, calm the sales wolf.
More minutes you attach, thus with stealthy pace
With colleagues at your sides, a single plan design
Move on to the Board. Ensure a firm-set plan,
Fear not our quips, the way we talk, no fear.
Some small adjustments we may talk about.
And take the present plan and deploy as,
This now suits the Board. S&OP is done, and leads
Towards defeat of those where S&OP lives not.

For fans of the man himself, here is the original William Shakespeare work.

Is this a dagger which I see before me,
The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee.
I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.
Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible
To feeling as to sight? or art thou but
A dagger of the mind, a false creation,
Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
I see thee yet, in form as palpable
As this which now I draw.
Thou marshall'st me the way that I was going;
And such an instrument I was to use.
Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses,
Or else worth all the rest; I see thee still,
And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood,
Which was not so before. There's no such thing:
It is the bloody business which informs
Thus to mine eyes. Now o'er the one halfworld
Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design
Moves like a ghost. Thou sure and firm-set earth,
Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear
Thy very stones prate of my whereabout,
And take the present horror from the time,
Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives:
Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives.

For a view of the lighter side of all things supply chain please click here.

 

Tags: FMCG, CEO, Humour, Performance Improvement, S&OP, Sales

FMCG Company disbands the Supply Chain function……..

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Mar 23, 2016

I am back on line again after a few days’ holiday post completion of some challenging factory footprint project work. One of the first catch-up meetings I have had was with an FMCG CEO. No names of course, but this is a medium-large sized player knocking on the blue-chip door. The company has a broad European supply network and is present in most markets. I have disguised the identity to protect the innocent or not so innocent!

I recall how many companies plodded along blindly with what we now accept as supply chain functions dispersed around other departments, e.g. procurement/buying and logistics in finance, planning with sales – I, along with many, am so pleased that the latter is no longer the case!

Many years flew by before all the essential elements of supply chain were brought under one organisation. Looking backwards now, it hardly seemed like rocket science but it was a painful process as established empires were dismantled and begrudging recognition given to what is still an undervalued function in a large number of companies. How many actually have a Chief Supply Chain Officer even now?

Although many were dragged kicking and screaming into the newly created function, there is no doubt those companies operating an integrated supply chain have seen huge benefits over succeeding years. Nothing happened overnight of course, as slowly but surely companies made massive strides in understanding cost, efficiency, service and innovation. Is it naïve to believe that supply chain is now considered equally important as say finance or those darlings in sales? The jury is probably still out on that one.

FMCG_SUPPLY_CHAIN_CEO.jpgSo, you could imagine my jaw dropping onto the worn leather inlay of the table when I heard from Mr./Mrs. CEO that this company had taken the decision to dissolve their supply chain and relocate elements across the other departments. The Supply Chain Director role just vanished off the top table in one fell swoop. Without doubt, there must be a leading edge reason for this bold and brave (yes, insert “crazy” or “stupid” or “daft” as you wish) move and I waited for the disclosure of the divine inspiration and associated logic.

No, there was none on offer in my humble opinion. The insight behind the decision was that the company wanted more direct board control over various areas of business and believed that a dispersion of roles was required. The fact that segregation of roles is necessary for auditable control and accountability has been at best over-looked let alone the impact on business performance.

The only outcome is a lack of cross functional clarity on how the Supply Chain contributes to business performance excellence. A return to functional silos where people will not take responsibility or be accountable and resort to lobbing blame-grenades over the office walls.

Why would you make such a decision? What are they really hiding from? Answers on a post card please as this one beats me. I am not suggesting supply chain development has finished and we have the ultimate design (far from it) but reverting to a disjointed 1980’s model in an effort to improve control is a contradiction.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: FMCG, CEO, Performance Improvement, Supply Chain

FMCG Supply Chain: KPI Scorecards - Don’t look back in anger

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Mar 16, 2016

For a change, UK has been my base for a few weeks and even in that short time I have started to genuinely think I must now be a different nationality if not from a different planet. When my denim jeans rip at the knees it is time to throw them out.  I do not have a badly drawn and inappropriately placed tattoo. Nothing on me is pierced and decorated with metal, precious or otherwise.

I do not have a preference for Ant or Dec – the “best” UK double act in a sea of tepid TV reality dross? What is Keith Lemon all about? So many TV channels yet so little worth watching. I put litter in waste bins. I still know how to queue. I honestly don’t care about the new line up of Top Gear. Even my waistline is now considered trim. I own music recordings where the performers wrote the lyrics and play the instruments and don’t get me started on that Justan Ameoba fool.

Nevertheless, there is something consistent. Something that has not noticeably changed since I packed my company leaving gift suitcases in 1991 and departed for the desert. Traffic Wardens.

FMCG_KPI_SCORECARD_SUPPLY_CHAIN.jpgBeing a Traffic Warden is a universally hated career choice and possibly third on the detest list after Tax Inspectors and Bankers these days with Politicians closing in, of course. In the UK wardens patrol the streets looking for vehicles illegally parked even for a short time or even if the front bumper/fender overlaps the authoritative double yellow lines by a few millimeters.

Why do they exist; the role that is, not the people? What good are they doing for the general public and the fuel duty/road tax cash-cow motorist? Are they here to keep the Queen’s highways, byways and pavements clear of transportation obstacles to allow free flow of vehicles, people and prams? Are they here to generate as much revenue as possible for councils and police authorities?

Is their role to gently correct errors, show understanding and guide people on their future behaviour or are they here to discipline, penalise, visually allocate blame with a sticky yellow ticket and generally strike fear and hate in drivers? Should people hide and shy away from traffic wardens and treat them with mistrust or should they be seen as a welcome, integral part of day to day living.

Friend or foe? Beauty or beast? Pariah or paragon? Ant or Dec?

So what does your Supply Chain team think about your monthly KPI Scorecard discussions within your IBP/S&OP process? Is it a meeting all about blame and backwards looking fault finding and discipline? Or is it what it should be, an open discussion about what needs to be done better by everyone in the current and coming periods?

You certainly must learn the lessons of past shortcomings but applying the learnings to the future is a far more positive and healthy experience for everyone.

Applying a “…don’t look back in anger” approach will lead you and the business to a much more profitable oasis within the FMCG market place.

Image courtesy of iosphere at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: FMCG, Performance Improvement, KPI, S&OP, IBP

Supply Chain: Communication teases out scorecard improvement

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Mar 03, 2016

When I used to spend far too much of my life flying around the globe I did my best to avoid cabin chat with fellow passengers. That may sound a bit miserable but I just needed some sleep before arriving at the next FMCG supply chain challenge.

I still prefer to strap in with a hand wrapped around an old Cockburn’s port (in business class) or a plastic cup of wine from godknowswhere in cattle class and sleep until touchdown. My record sleep was non-stop from Kuala Lumpur to London when the air crew checked I was actually breathing every few hours.

Even then there were some travellers who obviously needed their chat fix to relax and they were persistent. This led me to design a range of responses to the inevitable “what do you do?” enquiry that would leave the chat ball squarely in their court and keep it there!  My top five “stop the chat” responses were:

  1. I have just been released from prison for a really bad thing but don’t worry, my drugs usually get me through the flight.
  2. I am an undertaker with excess capacity seeking new business.
  3. I am an erotic dancer and stripper (no, not of the paint kind).
  4. I collect nail clippings; from hamsters.

If they persisted I would look them deeply in the eyes and say:

  1. I’ll do whatever you’d like me to do………

FMCG_SUPPLY_CHAIN_COMMUNICATION_SCORECARD.jpgThe temptation to do this in business must be avoided as discussion and debate are of course vital for success.  Nevertheless, the wrong question at the wrong time in the wrong tone can hide issues and keep them hidden until lasting damage is done. When questioning is consistently about what went badly you seldom hear what really did go wrong only what the “accused” is willing to reveal without exposing themselves or colleagues. 

To stem the tide of accusative questioning in an IBP/S&OP meeting try a different approach and see how colleagues react. Throw in a few of these questions/requests to get the chat ball freely bouncing back and forth and avoid the what went wrong/who did wrong interrogation.

Performance Scorecard

Measurement

Achievement

Board feedback

Forecast Accuracy

85%

Getting better. Please share some of the successes from the month to see if can share the learnings across all categories.

Overall Equipment Efficiency

75%

How can we maintain this momentum so we can continue to postpone new capex?

Picking Accuracy

99.95%

Nearly perfect; can we do any more or is it a case of diminishing returns?

Customer Service Level

98.75%

We are delighting 98.5% of our customers but some still need a bit more from us, or do they? Why don’t we check what the other 1.5% really need from our extended supply chain?

Inventory Level

15 days

Such a difference to 12 months ago after our SC Analytics investment. Could we shave off another day?

When you see scores very close to the objective or what is actually possible given the constraints of your supply chain then change the approach. Tease out a little more performance rather than stopping the chat ball dead in its tracks.

Image courtesy of stockimages at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Performance Improvement, KPI, Communication