Supply Chain Blog

Case Study: FMCG (Friendly Man Carrying Gifts) RTM (Reindeer To Market)

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Dec 07, 2016

Client :         Santa Claus aka Father Christmas, Kris Kringle, St. Nick or simply Santa

Market:        A large part of the World

Scope:          FMCG Reindeer Route To Market Distribution

Deliverable: Evaluation of RTM against sector benchmarks

table xmas.png

In summary, this Enchange project delivered:

  • A detailed evaluation of the Christmas RTM deployment highlighting strengths and weaknesses.
  • A grading of each core element in terms of capability to deliver the presents in comparison to benchmarks.
  • A framework development plan for parents and Santa Claus.
  • A clear business case for the continuation of Christmas. 

We would like to thank Mr. S. Claus for allowing us the opportunity to evaluate this important Reindeer To Market network. The network is in very good condition and we wish him every success on the 25th December.

Give your FMCG business a Christmas present and evaluate your Friendly Man Carrying Gifts (FMCG) Reindeer To Market (RTM) network. Need help with your RTM deployment? Click here and we will give you a call.

Santa image courtesy of stock images at freeditialphotos.net

                                               Other seasonal Yo Ho Ho posts:

FMCG_RTM_SUPPLY_CHAIN_HUMOUR.jpg* Santa & Opening Presents - Why S&OP is Invaluable at Christmas
* The Twelve Days of Supply Chain

Tags: FMCG, Christmas, Humour, Supply Chain, RTM

FMCG Company Board : Santa delivers their Christmas gifts

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Dec 22, 2014

Christmas is coming, the goose is getting fat and you might want to put a penny or even a Euro in an old man’s hat. Once again it is nearly time for a cynical Supply Chain Santa to distribute presents to the FMCG/Brewing/Pharmaceutical Board directors. Have they all been good this year? What does cynical Santa have on his sleigh for each of you?

Santa presents S&OP resized 600After dashing through the snow, cynical Santa arrives at the first house in a very trendy part of town. Who lives here? Yes, this is the very swish bungalow (think about that for a second) of the marketing director decorated with over 10,000 flashing lights. Squeezing down the chimney and out through the fireplace Santa finds himself in a warm, brightly lit room with a large stocking hanging on the door handle. Without making a noise, Santa opened his vast sack and took out 3 presents to leave in the marketing stocking:

An alarm clock that activates between 07.00 and 08.00 and cannot be re-set.

A wooden cabinet for displaying advertising agency corporate gifts.

A rolling 12 month Sasco wall chart calendar for activity planning – yeah, right!

Santa closed his sack tightly and climbed back up the chimney where Rudolph was ready to take him to his next destination. A short flight took them to a very neat area with houses all the same size and neatly arranged in regimented rows with postage stamp sized lawns.

With a larger chimney pot Santa was quickly inside the house and in a pleasant room with a fish tank bubbling away in the corner. Santa wasted no time in reaching into his sack and left three gifts for the Finance Director:

A huge external hard drive to hold the multiple Excel forecast files.

An automatic bean counting device – ok, a calculator.

A spend restrictor for the marketing budget, ie a taser.

Up and away once again over the snow topped building, Santa flew to the really posh part of town. A very large house with 2 chimneys, a swimming pool and a boat in the driveway? This must be the CEO’s house but no, the Sales Director lives here.

Santa chose a chimney to wriggle down and entered a large room with beautiful furniture and all the latest electrical gadgets and appliances. What could you give to the Sales Director who has everything?

A mirror to look him/herself in the eyes after making a forecast.

An alphabet that does not stop at “I”.

The Guinness Book of excuses for failure to make the target.

After exiting via the second chimney in the room where the walls were covered in training course certificates, cynical Santa snapped the reigns and headed off into the icy cold sky.

Next stop was in an old part of town near to the industrial area. A ancient Citroen 2CV was on the drive and with solar panels across the roof of this address, Rudolf had to be careful not to cause any damage. A sign on the chimney listed a number of safety precautions and duly noting them, Santa slipped inside and soon had the presents neatly inserted in the Supply Chain Director’s stocking:

A crystal ball.

A warehouse with Tardis capability.

A full size artificial thick skin with a specially reinforced back to repel knives.

Leaving a pro-forma invoice with the presents Santa signed himself out of the house in the visitors log book and took to the sky once more.

Flying low across the rooftops Rudolph brought the sleigh to a halt in a part of town where every single house was exactly the same size, shape and beige in colour. Every house had cars that were beige and signs on the front doors telling a whole host of people and occupations not to knock or ring the doorbell.

As Santa was not yet on the forbidden list, he slid down the chimney and into the house of the HR Director. Working quickly as the dark of night slowly ebbed away, Santa dipped into the sack and left his presents:

A book, “Make yourself redundant and see how you feel”.

Another book, “How to erode terms and conditions by stealth”.

A massive ball of beige wool to pull over eyes.

Leaving in good time before any restructuring was suggested, Santa climbed aboard the sleigh once more and Rudolph took him to his final destination before daylight cracked open on another Christmas Day.

Christmas S&OP Sleigh resized 600That final destination was the house where the CEO, partner and 2.5 children lived. This was a house not as large as the Sales Director but clearly comfortable and reflecting the seniority of the role. One last time Santa forced his way down the chimney and dropped in to the fortunately cold fire place. After a difficult year Santa left the CEO three gifts:

A prayer book.

A headhunter website subscription.

S&OP from Enchange – this would make the previous two obsolete, of course.

With all presents delivered, cynical Santa and red-nosed Rudolph took the sleigh back to the Christmas grotto garage where the elves prepared it for long term storage. 

Do you think everyone will be happy with their presents? I think the Supply Chain Director might be but then again I am just a little biased!

Enjoy!

Santa photo courtesy of stockimages at freedigitalphotos.net

Sleigh photo courtesy of suphakit73 at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: Christmas, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Supply Chain, S&OP

An FMCG Supply Chain Christmas Story

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Dec 18, 2014

Xmas treeEbenezer Bruise is a miserly, cold-hearted FMCG CEO, who continues to berate his Supply Chain people even as Christmas approaches. As far as Bruise is concerned every problem in the company is caused by Supply Chain. He rejects a Christmas dinner invitation by muttering under his breath that the food would not arrive on time, the meat would be pigeon instead of turkey ad it will all probably be out of date. In the entire company his is the only desk free of Christmas cards and decoration but full of corporate gifts he has kept to himself.

This is a person who does not like the last quarter and particularly the year-end. Bruise knocks over snowmen and even boos when he passes the charity brass bands collecting money in the snowy street. His favourite past time appears to be shouting at his overworked Supply Chain Director, Bob Planit. Bob has been a loyal employee for reasons nobody seems to understand.

That night after putting his three-legged cat outside for the night in the sub-zero conditions, Ebenezer Bruise climbs into his bed to sleep. Ordinary people may count sheep to get to sleep but Bruise counts the number of people he has dismissed from the company during the year. When he reaches three figures he falls into a deep sleep while snoring like a pneumatic drill digging into rock-hard concrete. During the night, Bruise’s former Sales Director Jake Barley, dead for seven years, visits him in the form of a ghost. Barley's spirit has been in suspended turmoil since he died one day before payment of his annual bonus as punishment for being consumed with working in a Sales silo and sniping at other departments, especially Supply Chain. Barley has come to warn Bruise and provide the opportunity of saving him from the very same fate. The warnings will be delivered on time, in full by three visiting spirits.

Bruise falls asleep into snoring oblivion once again but wakes up to find the Ghost Of Supply Chain Past, a small, elderly man not unlike Mr Bean. The Bean-like ghost uses his I-Pad 6 to show Bruise scenes from history that follow Bruise's career development from a young boy with a clutch of A-level certificates. The scene shows Bruise, lonely but with the potential for happiness, as a young man with the first traces of ignorance and ambition that would deny love and real friendship in his life. Surprisingly, Bruise shows tearful emotion when studying the images and seeing his former self. An indication of the effect this spirit was having was that Bruise had not cried since school when he sat on a chair full of drawing pins in the Physics lab. The collective guffaw of the class still fresh in his mind.

Bruise returns to his pneumatic sleep and almost immediately he is awakened by the Ghost Of Supply Chain Present. This spirit has but a fleeting time on earth and quickly shows Bruise several local scenes of Christmas joy and charity. Then, with a slide of a spiritual finger down the I-Pad screen shows him a view of the Planit household. The ghost informs Bruise that unless the future is changed, the Planit’s crippled yet good-hearted young colleague and lodger, Jolly Tall will die from stress and overeating carbohydrates in an impoverished diet. Finally, ragged boy and girl misty figures float out from beneath the ghost's robes. The ghost introduces them as Ignorance and Ambition and warns Bruise to beware of both in equal measure.

Again; back to deep sleep but not for long. The quiet, black-clad Ghost Of Supply Chain Yet To Come takes the place of the other ghost. The Alice Cooper-like figure shows Bruise several scenes of people discussing someone's dismissal yet no one seems upset by the departure. Indeed, every single person in the vision seems overjoyed and happy with the news. Bruise does not yet realise the identity of the unfortunate person. He learns that Jolly Tall has sadly died after developing pneumonia through a hole in his shoe rather from the expected mal-nutrition. Bruise finally discovers that he is the one who has been dismissed and whose departure has only pleased people. Through misty eyes Bruise pleads that these scenes of the future can be altered and vows to incorporate the lessons of the past, present and future ghosts into his adoption of the Supply Chain Christmas spirit.

Bruise wakes up back in his bed and realises that the whole adventure took only one night and it is now Christmas Day. The snow is falling and Noddy Holder and Slade can heard bashing out their 1970’s Christmas anthem in the distance. Wrapping up well, Bruise brings the cat inside to thaw and walks into the town. On his way to the office he smiles and shakes hands with everyone he sees, bringing startled looks upon their faces.

He sends a large turkey to the Planit family, gives a sizable donation to the charity worker he previously insulted and has a wonderful time at Fred's party. The next day he gives Planit a pay rise! Bruise continues his kindly ways after Christmas, befriending everyone and becoming a second father to Jolly Tall, who does not die due to a hole in the sole. He never sees the ghosts again, but he keeps the spirit of Christmas and Supply Chain alive in his heart as well as anyone.

Image credit: HikingArtist.com

Tags: Christmas, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Supply Chain, Forecasting & Demand Planning

FMCG CEO 2014 Letter to Santa Claus (aka Father Christmas)

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Dec 11, 2014

FMCG/Brewing/Pharma CEO Letter to Santa ClausDear Santa,

I have been a very good FMCG CEO this year, I promise. If you want, you can check with my shareholders. They know how good I have been this year. Apart from the out of stocks of course, oh and the little mistake where we had to write stock off and waste lots of our money. But that is not so bad is it? Other CEOs were naughty last year and they still got what they wanted from you.

I had better be honest because you will know if I am not telling the truth. We also had a problem starting S&OP and so our planning, forecast accuracy and sales were not very good. They were not really big problems so I hope you can forget about them this time, please. Next year I promise to be better, I do, honest.

I forgot about the Route To Market (RTM) mess we had in the peak sales months but that really was not my fault. I promise to do something about RTM next year and make sure it works properly so people who buy our products are not disappointed again. I know it is bad when people come to buy our products and then spend their money on something else. I will talk to our distributors and Enchange and find out what we need to do.

I know, I know, when the new ERP computer system was switched on we were not really ready for the change but we did make it better as fast as possible. I did not think we needed any outside help for the new IT but I admit I was wrong. Next time I will get it right, hopefully without having any lost sales.

The factory thing was not my fault, I think. The factory man promised me lots of product but his machines kept breaking down at the wrong times and we had to wait for the fixing men to arrive. They took ages to get the machines working again and they broke down again and again. No, it is not a very reliable factory.

Does the warehouse problem count as well? We could not find our products when we wanted them and then when we did find them they were old and out of date and of no use to us. This was very sad but it will not happen again next year, I hope.

I have just read my message again to make sure I did not spell any words wrong and I see I was not as good as I thought. Actually, after reading this I am going to the chimney to take my stocking down and put it away in the Christmas storage box. I will try again next year, Santa.

Bye bye and Happy Christmas.

CEO

Image credit: HikingArtist.com

Tags: Route to Market, Christmas, Logistics Service Provider, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Performance Improvement, Traditional Trade, S&OP, Sales, Inventory Management & Stock Control

FMCG CEO Gift: Implement S&OP this Christmas – Slade style.

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Dec 09, 2014

Christmas is coming around quickly so who better than Noddy Holder and Slade to suggest you give a Sales & Operational Planning (S&OP) process to your business as a present. This Christmas song has been heard at Christmas every year since 1973! If you don't know the tune then click here for the original non-S&OP version.

1 2 3 4.......

Are you looking at your sales chart on the wall? Sales and Operational Planning
Is it the time you have to stop the fall?
You’ve tried overpaying salesmen,
You’ve loaded up the trade
Do you need to find a better way?

Chorus:
So here it is S&OP
Everybody should run one
Look to the future; how?
Six months or even 1.

Are you guessing how much you’re going to sell?
Are you suffering high out of stock as well?
Does supply chain always tell you, pre-SOP is best?
So why not work together for a test?

Chorus:
So here it is S&OP
Everybody should run one
Look to the future; how?
Six months or even 1.

What will the salesmen do
When they see their targets being met?
Ah ah
They’ll be changing the chart gradient on the wall.
Not for them will sales fall and fall.
When you implement S&OP you make quite a change
Looking back the old way will feel so strange.

Chorus:
So here it is S&OP
Everybody should run one
Look to the future ;  how?
Six months or even 1.

Noddy knows best so why not find out about S&OP right now and give your business the perfect gift.

Tags: FMCG, Christmas, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, S&OP, Forecasting & Demand Planning

(FMCG) Friendly Man Carrying Gifts & (RTM) Reindeer To Market

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Dec 02, 2014
Client:   
Santa Claus aka Father Christmas, Kris Kringle, St Nick
Market: Most of the World
Scope:
Reindeer To Market (RTM) Distribution
Deliverable: Evaluation of RTM against sector benchmarks

Summary of Evaluation

Click here to enlargeMagnifying Glass

 RTM reindeer to market

The project delivered:

  • A detailed evaluation of the Christmas RTM deployment highlighting strengths and weaknesses.
  • A grading of each core element in terms of capability to deliver the presents in compariosn to benchmarks.
  • A framework development plan for parents and Santa Claus.
  • A clear business case for the continuation of Christmas.

Santa FMCG Christmas resized 600We would like to thank Mr. Claus for allowing us the opportunity to evaluate this important Reindeer To Market network. The network is in very good condition and we wish him every success on the 25th December.

Need help with your RTM deployment? Click here and we will give you a call.

Santa image courtesy of stock images at freedigitalphotos.net

The full assessment tool includes 10 individual elements and this can be found HERE.

Other seasonal yo ho ho posts:


Tags: FMCG, Route to Market, Christmas, Dave Jordan, Pharma, Traditional Trade, Distribution, RTM Assessment Tool

Communication & more communication gives S&OP a fighting chance

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Feb 05, 2014

Ok, here we go again on another merry-go-round of Supply Chain stretch, strife, strain but hopefully success.

All the decorations should be back in their boxes by now. The lights where the red set doesn’t flash and the white set that only work when you bend the plastic coated wire in two and stick it with tape - fix them before next year? No, I doubt it too. The Father Christmas toilet seat cover - what do you mean you don’t have one? – has been returned to its protective bag in the loft which makes everyone feel a lot more comfortable in the bathroom. Father Christmas always sees what you are doing, remember…..

So how did your season of goodwill go? What about the company Christmas party?  Such events are usually good for morale and a laugh even well into the following year. Who danced with the young blond/e receptionist – choose your own gender here? Why did the electrician and the canteen lady leave rather early? Who asked the DJ to pay The Lambada again and again and again? All will be revealed in vending machine gossip in the coming months.

S&OP communication resized 600You get a decent glimpse of your company reality when different departments ask for separate Christmas party events and this is compounded only by your agreement to the request. Ok, if you have your various functions in all corners of the country or even globe then local events are obviously cost effective. By the same score if you employ thousands of staff you are not going to find a venue large enough within a reasonable budget. However, isn’t it sad that some smaller organisations allow each department to skulk off and do their own things?

Small groups of people quaffing the foaming ale, alco-pops and fizzy wine inevitably results in a slow but sure eruption of their pent-up tensions about colleagues. Gossip, criticism and bitterness all escalating to the depressing bass beat of Do They Know It’s Christmas?.  What if you could harness all that energy behind your Sales & Operations Planning  (S&OP) process and persuade people to “prove colleagues right” rather than highlight failings?

All your initiatives to improve sales and supply chain performance within S&OP are bound to fail if people do not communicate or communicate negatively. How many times do you see employees having a real conversation with a colleague? A rarity in my view – as rare as an honest politician. People are usually concerned with their own similarly unhelpful politics and protecting their own backsides and departments rather than doing what is best for the company.

You can have the biggest budgets, the best supporting IT systems, brilliant brands, stunning marketing but if your people are communicating negatively or not at all then any attempt to grow your business with the aid of S&OP is doomed to failure. Futile!

CEO's should get this sorted out before the lights go dim on their own careers!

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Christmas, Dave Jordan, CEO, Supply Chain, S&OP, Sales

FMCG: Why do Chocolate Producers struggle at Christmas & Easter?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jan 08, 2014

Post Christmas I have been taking a look at International Key Account retailers and seeing how they are coping in the current economic squeeze. One question came to me after seeing well over 20 outlets of various retailers. What do they all do with all that chocolate and other confectionery?

Planning Chocolate Sale The same scene is present after Easter too. Shelf after shelf and gondola after gondola of seasonal chocolate in all sorts of formats, shapes and sizes. Not simple packaging either and it must cost a fortune to pack a 15cm tall ‘chokky’ Santa into a multi-coloured coffret. To be fair it is not just one manufacturer who has suffered a forecasting blip, every single major name chocolate producer appears unable to get it right. For all of them Christmas must be a peak period and one that can make or break the year end results and with no time left to remedy any sales deficit. Similarly, the timing can also place an un-provisioned hole in Q1 numbers.

Of course, nobody wants to disappoint consumers and run out of stock at those peak periods but how can they afford the apparent over-stocking? If the goods are on consignment or “sale or return" then I can perhaps understand why retailers let displays hang around for several weeks. Even then I doubt the retailers would relish wasting sales space on Easter themed chocolate into June and beyond.

Considering the power retailers have over producers I do not understand why stock is allowed to gather dust on shelves. Certainly, for many foodstuffs the listing contracts will contain clauses to withdraw stocks but usually only when the sell-by date approaches or off-take is ridiculouly low.

What is the destiny of chocolate Santas and bunny rabbits after the sell-by date arrives? You cannot do much with it, can you? You cannot send it to a sink market in another country and with the vast majority of edibles you cannot recycle the stuff into fresh production as you could with washing powder, for example. If you have to write-off stock you have to pay to have it destroyed professionally and you frequently have to pay VAT on the value as if it was a sale.

Whatever the destiny of all that yummy chocolatey goodness, it is indicative of a lack of rigour in forecast and/or sales expectations. Diverting some investment from stock that does not sell to taking a long, hard look at your Sales & Operational Planning (S&OP) process could offer a very rapid pay-back for the companies willing to break the chocolate mould.

 

 

Tags: FMCG, Christmas, Dave Jordan, Supply Chain, S&OP, Forecasting & Demand Planning

FMCG/Pharma Route To Market (RTM) & Jingle Bells

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Dec 19, 2013


Why not make sure your festivities don’t fizzle out as soon as January sales numbers arrive. Get into the spirit of Route To Market (RTM) Distribution right now with our take on Jingle Bells!

Why are sales so low?
I don’t know what to say
We expect to grow
But no, it’s not the way
Emergency bells ring
Makes the bonus light
We will keep struggling
Til we do something right

Oh, nothing sells, nothing sells
Every single day
Oh, how much we have tried
To have Distributors obey
Nothing sells, nothing sells
Enchange showed the way
Now that they’re on our side
RTM works okay

Enchange they did go,
To every partner site,
Strict assessment was done
By colour coded traffic light;
All areas were assessed;
Against defined benchmarks;
Compared versus the best,
But we saw poor marks!

Oh, nothing sells, nothing sells
Every single day
Oh, how much we have tried
To have Distributors obey
Nothing sells, nothing sells
Enchange showed the way
Now they’re on our side
RTM works okay

And now that we know,
Why we do not sell
We have a project on the go
To fix it very, very well;
Partners on our side
We’re showing them they way,
Changes far and wide
Improving by the day,

Oh, nothing sells, nothing sells
Every single day
Oh, how much we have tried
To have Distributors obey
Nothing sells, nothing sells
Enchange showed the way
Now they’re on our side
RTM works okay

That was the way to go
With Enchange by our side
A future that was bright
Soon stopped the sales slide
The cure was free of strife
Slick network now we’ve got
We see a brand new lease of life
Sales and share up a lot

Oh, nothing sells, nothing sells
Every single day
Oh, how much we have tried
To have Distributors obey
Nothing sells, nothing sells
Enchange showed the way
Now they’re on our side
RTM works okay

Christmas RTM Sales resized 600

 

Click here to see our other seasonal offerings.

Click here to see what Enchange can offer your FMCG/Pharmaceutical/Brewing company.

        Image courtesy of Keerati at freedigitalphotos.net                                   

Tags: FMCG, Route to Market, Christmas, Dave Jordan, Humour, Supply Chain, Sales

The Twelve Days of Supply Chain

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Dec 18, 2013

On the first day of Christmas, 12 days of SC Xmas  Small2 copy resized 600
Enchange gave to me 
A robust S&OP. 

On the second day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the third day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the fourth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the fifth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the sixth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
A suite of KPI’s 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the seventh day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Lower carbon footprint, 
A suite of KPI’s,
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics, 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the eighth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
The RTM Tool, 
Lower carbon footprint, 
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the ninth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
Lower carbon footprint, 
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the tenth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Great Customer Service,
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
Lower carbon footprint, 
A suite of KPI’s 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the eleventh day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Integrated Supply Chain, 
Great Customer Service, 
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
Lower carbon footprint, 
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the twelfth day of Christmas,                                                                          Enchange gave to me
APO Implementation
Integrated Supply Chain, 
Great Customer Service, 
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
Lower carbon footprint, 
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

Other seasonal posts:

Oscar Supply Chain Blog

Tags: Christmas, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Performance Improvement, Supply Chain, S&OP, Forecasting & Demand Planning