Supply Chain Blog

Global FMCG Supply Chain Transformed by Analytics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Apr 05, 2017

The Challenge

A leading global FMCG company undertook an aggressive supply chain improvement programme across 150 markets. The objective was 100% alignment of worldwide operational activities with company strategy and objectives. Not an insignificant task! 

The Problem

The organisation routinely calculated and published multiple KPIs and targets, but a lack of data integrity, accessibility and insightful reporting limited supply chain progress. Data was ‘scattered’ across multiple sources including enterprise ERP, market ERP, multiple factory systems and MI systems. No shortage of data but a severe dearth of insight and information.

In several markets, the organisation was suffering from volatile and highly variable short-term supply chain plans and an excess of finished goods inventory, despite a stable and predictable consumption. The ways of working within the supply chain and the interactions externally were traditional, with operating practices and decision making analysis unchanged for far too many years.

The Solution

Engagement with key stakeholders across the business established the corporate need and critical success factors for the analysis. A Toolset & suite of SKU-level Dashboards was developed, focussing on demand, planning, materials, production & execution. Company data was extracted into the toolset to provide information leading to appropriate actions. New monthly reporting and analysis revealed significant inventory reduction opportunities and importantly, operational management had the confidence to drive the required changes with a far greater understanding of potential outcomes.

sc_transformation_supplyvue_updated.pngThe Winning Tool

SupplyVue is a revolutionary supply chain analytics solution.

  • SupplyVue uses existing data to analyse and diagnose problems and successes in the supply chain.
  • SupplyVue provides a suite of tools and dashboards to model different inventory, financial and service level scenarios.
  • SupplyVue provides the visibility, data, information and business case to drive changes in the supply chain while fully understanding potential trade-offs.
  • SupplyVue enables provides visibility across the end-to-end supply chain to deliver better service to internal and external stakeholders.

The Result

Hard work, patience and trust in the analytics tool provided:

  • Improved forecasting accuracy.
  • Senior management tools to set informed policy.
  • For the first time, planners had powerful and relevant tools to perform root cause analysis of supply chain issues.

The big one? The company achieved an inventory reduction of 40% (yes, forty) in 12 markets amounting to US$ 200 million. Not too shabby eh?

Plus, something that is difficult to measure. SupplyVue raised the morale of supply chain staff who were now able to offer intelligent and assured solutions rather than shoulder shrugs and excuses.

The Future

Would you like to read more about analytics?

Supply Chain Analytics

SupplyVue

The Pathway

How to transform your supply chain?

The Next Important Step

Enchange can help you transform your supply chain, the overall business and personal ambitions!

To find out how we can help you and to enquire about our wide range of supply chain and related services please click here and contact us.

Image courtesy of Enchange.com

Tags: Customer service, FMCG, KPI, Supply Chain, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics

Supply Chains – A second look: What do all those initials really mean?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Feb 08, 2017

In common with many business functions Supply Chains adopt multiple initials and/or acronyms to describe various tasks and processes they manage on a daily basis. Those not familiar with SC-speak will often sit bemused as various initials are quoted and debated and then usually blamed for some tenuous lost sales claimed by Sales and Marketing.

Here I take a fresh look at just a small selection of those Supply Chain initials and acronyms.

SC – Super Colleagues. Well, I may be biased but that is what you usually find. Supply Chain people must react to wildly varying demands and impossible timings but more often than not they succeed to get stock to the right place at the right time.

SOP - Supports Outstanding Performance. If you do not follow an S&OP process and your business is doing well and is robust then a pat on the back is deserved. However, if your business is struggling then you might consider the benefits of S&OP which can make all the difference.

IBP – Irritating But Productive. Often considered to be a more mature version of S&OP, Integrated Business Planning can be similarly difficult to get started but when everything clicks, business benefits.

Supply_Chain_FMCG_Initials.jpgSAP - Spreadsheets Are Preferred. The use of spreadsheets is prevalent in many businesses and equally common is the number of CEO’s who believe spreadsheets are NOT being used in their workplace! They almost certainly are but what can you do about this?

IKA- Irritating, Keep Away. In mature Western European markets, big name International Key Accounts are firmly established but in many other parts of the world the reality is quite the reverse. Traditional Trade is a very important part of many developing businesses yet most fail to pay sufficient attention to the continued growth potential of the TT channel.

SKU - Sales Keep “Upping”. Introducing new SKUs really should be a cross business decision taken within the context of S&OP and with sound financial analysis. Sadly, this does not happen very often as businesses rack up lengthy SKU lists where the tail items do not even pay for themselves in turnover, margin or profit.

KPI - Keeping People Interested. The adage of “if you don’t measure then you cannot improve” is certainly true here. Take care to manage your KPI’s closely and frequently but make sure you have a set which ensures everyone knows how they impact collective team performance and results. Visibly reward against the relevant KPIs and your staff will keenly follow them.

ERP – Everyone Requires Products. The whole purpose of your Enterprise Resource Planning is to get your products to the right place at the right time and at optimum cost. Occasionally, priorities must be made between demanding customers and a good ERP will guide your decisions.

PLP -  People Loading Products. Think long and had before outsourcing your outbound logistics operations to a 3rd party as they may not be ready to take on your business, seamlessly.  Prepare thoroughly and ensure you know exactly what you want from them and the relationship. A big step that is difficult to reverse without pain so be careful!

WMS - Where’s My Stock? Your 3PLP partner should be left to run their own business as that is why you pay them. However, you need to be involved in the stock counting process or you will lose sales and experience costly year-end write offs.

4PLP - 4 People Loading Products. If you have successfully used 3PLPs for some time you might wish to take a look at what a 4PLP can offer to the business. This is certainly not for everyone but can be very cost effective.

RTM - Retail Takes Money. Whether your focus is on IKA or TT how you manage your distribution network will be a key driver of your success in the market place. It is a fact that companies spending time and effort getting their developing market TT distributor networks in good order are more successful.

FIFO – Find It, Fuss Over. When you (or your 3PLP) operate a tight warehousing operation you will know where your stock sits, how old it is and what needs to move out to avoid write off costs and the inevitable poor customer service.

OTIF - Often The Invoice Fails. If you fail to deliver orders on time and in full you invite the customer to challenge the invoice and delay payment until you have made financial adjustments.

There are many, many more examples of SC-speak but this set will do for a KO so TTFN!

Image courtesy of boulemonademoon at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: SKU, FMCG, Route to Market, Dave Jordan, KPI, Traditional Trade, S&OP, Logistics Management, Distribution, Inventory Management & Stock Control

FMCG CEO 2016 Letter to Santa Claus (aka Father Christmas)

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Dec 20, 2016

FMCG/Brewing/Pharma CEO Letter to Santa ClausDear Santa,

I have been a very good FMCG CEO this year, I promise. If you want, you can check with my shareholders. They know how good I have been this year. Apart from the out of stocks of course, oh and the little mistake when we had to write stock off and waste lots of our money. But that is not so bad is it? Other CEOs were naughty last year and they still got what they wanted from you.

I had better be honest because you will know if I am not telling the truth. We also had a problem starting S&OP and so our planning, forecast accuracy and sales were not very good. They were not really big problems so I hope you can forget about them this time, please. Next year I promise to do better, I do, honest.

I forgot about the Route To Market (RTM) mess we had in the peak sales months but that really was not my fault. I also promise to do something about RTM next year and make sure it works properly so people who buy our products are not disappointed again. I know it is bad when people come to buy our products and then spend their money on something else. I will talk to our distributors and Enchange and find out what we need to do.

I know, I know, when the new ERP computer system was switched on we were not really ready for the change but we did make it better as fast as possible. I did not think we needed any outside help for the new IT but I admit I was wrong. Next time I will get it right, hopefully without having any lost sales.

The factory thing was not my fault, I think. The factory man promised me lots of product but his machines kept breaking down at the wrong times and we had to wait for the fixing men to arrive. They took ages to get the machines working again and then they broke down again and again. No, it is not a very reliable factory, yet.

Does the warehouse problem count against me as well? We could not find our products when we wanted them and then when we did find them they were old and out of date and of no use. This was very sad but it will not happen again next year, I hope.

I have just read my message again to make sure I did not spell any words wrong and I see I was not as good as I thought. Actually, after reading this I am going to the chimney to take my stocking down and put it away in the Christmas storage box. I will try again next year, Santa.

Bye bye and Happy Christmas.

CEO FMCG

Image credit: HikingArtist.com

Tags: Route to Market, Christmas, Logistics Service Provider, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Performance Improvement, Traditional Trade, S&OP, Sales, Inventory Management & Stock Control

Supply Chain Analytics: Is your data providing information & actions?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Nov 09, 2016

Who coined the term “Big Data”? How did we get there without tiny data, ordinary data, slightly larger data, chubby data and bordering on big data? People working in or associated with Supply Chains seem obsessed by data yet data itself tells you absolutely nothing. Really, not a lot apart from the fact that something is being measured or calculated.

Firstly, a couple of information irritations. If you need to renew your UK passport (must be similar for other countries too) you need to have your identity confirmed by someone in a certain profession, e.g. doctor, teacher and be a person of “good standing in their community”. The allowed list of professions includes Bankers which baffles me these days. Anyway, the signatory must provide information confirming your identification and you get the passport. Information and not data gets the job done.

 

My bank writes to me – note, sends me a physical letter – asking me to confirm my address! “If you know where I live why do I have to call you to confirm what you already know?” TINA as Maggie Thatcher would say, there is no alternative so you must bite your tongue and provide the information.

In Supply Chains the data obsession is growing. “Show me the data. How does the latest data look? Will the data protect my backside?” Data is only valuable if you know what it is measuring, what it means and what you need to do to change or influence an aspect of future business performance. For data to be useful it must be converted into useful information and then into appropriate actions.

Someone is shouting “data is information isn’t it”? Well, no it is not and as Michael Caine insists he never said, “not a lot of people know that”. Consider this example.

Due to some poor forward planning by the travel department you find yourself airborne for the duration of a vital end of season relegation encounter. On leaving the plane you ask an airport worker about the big football game. All he/she can tell you is that 4 goals were scored. Is that helpful?

CANALYTICS_SUPPLY_CHAIN_DATA_INFORMATION.jpgertainly, the match sounds like it was entertaining but your overpaid wimpy football idols needed a win. The data you have been given is 100% accurate but it does not actually tell you anything about the outcome. Was it 2-2, 3-1, 1-3 or even a diabolical 4-0/0-4?

When you understand the final score was 3-1 in favour of your football wimps you are elated and think about kissing the moustachioed guy at security but back down just in time – that metal detector sausage could cause some damage. Instead of being as sick as a parrot you are over the moon, y’know what I mean?

You have converted that raw goals scored data into information and then into celebratory actions. In terms of actions this means you have wisely decided against kissing the Village People lookalike security guard to head off to quaff several pints of the foaming ale. When you only had the 4-goal data you had no idea of the outcome.

Increasingly you need to turn to analytics to understand what is actually happening in your Supply Chain why it is happening and most importantly, what needs to change for future business success.

Image courtesy of ddpavumba at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Supply Chain, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, IT

Fashion Retailers: Is inventory eating into your profits? (It is…)

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Aug 31, 2016

I touched on the problem of expanding UK waistlines a few blogs ago and the topic popped up again recently when I was out and about shopping for clothes – no, not me. This is not as regular an event as it may be for senior management but due to the imminent arrival of a few dry and summery days, I was in need of new shorts and T-shirts.

Nothing special or posy, just bog-standard items that do not have some sort of advertising logo blazoned across for which I receive no payment.  Similarly, I was keen to avoid those that look like someone has been assaulted by an ultimate, all-topping, deep-pan, soft-cheese pizza. Oh, and no fashionable rips and tears, either. Plain and simple and in one “quiet” colour; that’s me.

Fashion_retail_inventory_supply_chain_analytics.jpgIf I look at the internet – it’s all true there isn’t it? – then I am about the top end of average as long as it is not Christmas, Easter or holiday time. As everyone knows, bathroom scales do not work accurately during those periods and clothes shopping then is silly anyway. There started my rare shop for T-shirts and shorts in the medium/large size range. Should be relatively simple I thought as I started to dodge the bodies of the newly pedestrianised high street throng.

Alas, no BHS, no Austin Reed and now not even an Old Guys Rule to replenish my summer wardrobe but plenty of retail options remained. With a spring in my step I activated the soft hiss of the sliding doors and there I was in one of the largest clothes retailers in the game. No names mentioned in case it jinxes the chain and we lose another big name!

The choice in style and colour was good and the racks were very well stocked with lines and lines of T-shirts and shorts. Then the problem hit me. Although I was looking for M or L sizes the only items available were extra small, small, extra-large, XXL and even XXXL! (Don’t get me started on why extra small and XXXL must be the same price.) This was not an isolated case and after checking I realised this was true for the gaudy coloured stuff and the “stylish” pre-damaged items. What is going on?

This may only be a sample of 1 but this major UK chain with several international franchise locations is probably operating with several hundred thousands of Euros hanging on racks with only a small chance of being sold anytime soon. Sizes which fit a large proportion of the population are out of stock (OOS) presenting a huge lost sales problem. And it is not just T-shirts and shorts; have a look at hugely expensive suits, coats and shoes. The same may also be true of the ladies’ fashions but I decided against browsing those racks.

In FMCG, if your Heinz beans are OOS then you pick up HP or an own label offering in the same outlet and it does not really impact on the retailer or the consumer. Not so in clothing retail where alternative options are dotted around the adjacent shopping centres. Seeing multiple Mr. Averages walk out of your store due to OOS while a host of other sizes hang around is just plain daft.

How long does that working capital flap about in the stores eating into your profits? Inevitably, the seasons change and with that the styles adjust. New designs and new ranges are introduced but where do you put them? Eventually, to create space you have to withdraw the S/XXXL stock and either marginally discount it internally or more heavily with a third party.

The problem is not only about having too few top sellers but also about how you plan for the success of the entire size range and avoid over-stocking profit guzzlers. Nobody has a functioning crystal ball but you can apply some clever supply chain analytics to ensure your store inventory is designed for success and not for failure.

Image courtesy of mapichai at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: CEO, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, Integrated Business Planning, retail

FMCG – Hunkering down for Supply Chain Analytics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Aug 24, 2016

Have you ever “hunkered down”? I remember being asked to hunker down during a supply chain training course many years ago and I had no idea what I was supposed to do. Eventually I had to ask as failing to follow the hunker downwards request appeared to be causing a bit of a problem for the presenter.

This hunkering failure occurred during one of the many versions of the Beer Game in which I have taken part or run over the years. Anyone who has been involved with supply chain activities will probably have taken part in the Beer Game, or the Moussy Game as it is sometimes known in dry countries of the Middle East.

What does the beer game do? The rules are relatively simple and in summary the overall objective is to meet consumer demand for cases of beer in a complex, extended supply chain while controlling unplanned expense on back orders and inventory. The game involves four overlapping and inter-dependent supply chains, i.e. manufacturing, distribution, procurement and a retail outlet. There is a cost penalty for holding excess stock and any backlog unfulfilled orders.

Players rely on colleagues in the other departments to do the right things for the business but frustration soon surfaces. Usually, things do not go well and players feel frustrated because they are not getting the results they expect. Assumptions are made about consumer demand and erratic patterns emerge as backlogs mount and/or massive unnecessary stocks accumulate. It was at this stage in the game I was told to “hunker down……….”.

Does that sound like your own supply chain – not the hunkering bit? Frustration is common between departments who all aim to do the right thing but only have the necessary data and information to do the right thing for their specific area of responsibility at that specific time. Even after careful consideration and informed debate, the real effect of an adjustment can only be seen in the future.

supply_chain_analytics_fmcg_inventory_performance.jpgIF - a big if -  nothing else changes and all assumptions are correct and accurate then there is a chance the desired effect will develop. However, life is not like that and certainly not supply chain life. What can happen?

New launches kick-in and are successful, or not.

Competition by definition is designed to disrupt your plans.

The weather turns out rather different to the forecast.

The economy takes a turn up or down.

Factories, 3PLPs and distributors all suffer performance variability.

Customers and consumers change their needs and habits.

Etc., etc., etc., this list really is endless. Absolutely anything can happen to turn apparently sensible decisions into foolish, forecast failure.

Hey, what about all that IT we have? Doesn’t that help us understand what is going on? This should tell us what is really going to happen in supply chains? No, not necessarily. Common supply chain IT tells us what has happened, what is happening, where and when but not precisely why an event happened or what will happen.

Subtle differences perhaps but to up your game you need to hunker down with Supply Chain Analytics to gain a full unexpurgated understanding of how changes you make today will impact the future and more importantly, how you can change that future.

Yes, you can.

Image courtesy of Enchange at Enchange.com

Tags: Customer service, FMCG, CEO, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, IT

Olympic level FMCG performance or simply distributor over-stocking?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Aug 16, 2016

Wow, four years have flashed past since the London Olympic bunting was packed away and the metal polish put back under the sink. The 2016 Rio games are well and truly underway and the cauldron flame is alight for the duration.

Over 11,000 competitors from nearly 200 countries and even a refugee team have been getting up ridiculously early to sweat and train at whatever sport they excel. That is a huge number of really fit people who are focused on being in peak condition for a once in a lifetime event that might last less than 10 seconds or several hours.

Taking the 100m sprint as an example; the top sprinters will have 4 opportunities to perform. A combined window of 40 seconds to reflect all that money, time and effort that has been expended to qualify and perform to the best of their ability. What if they stumble or don’t hear the starting gun, drop the baton or worse still, get disqualified?

FMCG_INVENTORY_DISTRIBUTORS_CEO.jpgAll that planning and careful preparation to get to the final of the competition only to be disqualified for being a little twitchy waiting for the starting pistol to crack out loud. Or, sticking your foot just a millimeter into the triple jump plasticine. Hey, don’t worry, there will be another chance for you in Tokyo………

You are not in the final to perform in front of millions of people watching around the world. Nobody will see you perform and instead of your stock rising and attracting more lucrative advertising deals you will be remembered as that poor guy with the twitch or that girl with the too-big training shoes.

Cue segue. The global economy seems permanently stuck in “weak and unpredictable” performance mode with no obvious way out even for the dis-United Kingdom of Brexit. Imagine you are a yellow CEO Pac-Man (do they have female Pacs?) nibbling away at the dots and then getting stuck in a dead-end. What next, nowhere to go, panic, panic! Despite this, many CEOs will be under extreme pressure to “make the numbers”. How exactly? While all this Olympic activity is taking place is your physical FMCG stock rising as we move through the second half of the year?

Despite what sales and finance colleagues will spout, there is a limit to how much stock can you push into your trading channels and this includes International Key Accounts. Coercing (or more likely forcing) a distributor to take more and more stock may appear an easy option but it is an unsustainable action that damages your business in the long run.

At some stage a brave CEO has to say enough is enough and start a period of controlled destocking despite the effect this will have on top and bottom lines. Loading the trade does not happen by accident; you know you are doing it so stop deluding yourself and HQ and do something! Put a stake in the ground that sets the tone for the future.

You may believe that excess inventory means you will never be out of stock or off the shelves but this is not the case. The available stock will inevitably be unbalanced and just when you expect your long planned relaunch to fly out of the blocks and hit the shelf you also twitch and realise you have 9 months’ stock of the old product sitting in distributors warehouses.

What a disappointment. A waste of money, time and effort, i.e. an Olympic gold medal-sized goof and HQ is unlikely to give you another chance in a lot less than 4 years’ time.

Image courtesy of stockimages at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: FMCG, CEO, Distribution, RTM Assessment Tool, Inventory Management & Stock Control

Frock Stocks & FMCG Supply Chain Inventory Decisions

Posted by Dave Jordan on Thu, Aug 04, 2016

Senior Management has been on quite a shopping spree over the last few months taking advantage of various big name high street stores that have lost their lustre and even their premises in some cases. The demise of these familiar UK brands has nothing to do with Brexit and the variable value of Sterling but in one case a run on the Green pound has been responsible…..

Of course this has had several knock-on effects and not least the amount of money “invested” in clothes and shoes is now significant and that money is largely sunk - the market for unwanted or out of style apparel being extremely limited. I hate to think how much money is hanging in the wardrobe but that raises a second issue.

The trusty old Grink pine wardrobe from IKEA has reached capacity. As a result, the small Allen Keys have been out causing blistered fingers in order to erect another Grink plus a wall mounted Plop shoe tidy. Another investment to store items that are not in regular use. In fact, if you consider that the vast majority of clothes and shoes are seasonal, at any one time most of the space is taken with things you would not dream of wearing. Fake leather Boots in August? A floral summer dress in December? (NB Northern hemisphere before someone comments!) A Superwoman onesie at any time!

FMCG_INVENTORY_STOCK_SERVICE_CONTROL.jpgWith so many clothes squeezed into the now two Grinks they are so full that finding anything in a reasonable time is difficult. Senior Management might well be correct that there is a perfect dress in there for a particular special event but can you find it? Sooner or later all recollection of what is in the wardrobes has been lost as the memory grey matter section diminishes.

Worse still, fashion trends do not stand still so what was a “must have” last year may be considered an insult to the designer where they to be worn the following season, luvvie!  

So, what have we got and what have many, many FMCG and pharmaceutical companies?

High working capital – all that money tied up on stock that may not be useful.

High storage costs –  you will be paying too much for storage whether you manage logistics internally or outsource to a 3/4PLP. (Don’t expect them to reveal that you are storing too much!)

FIFO - stock age is not monitored and write offs persist. Old stock is not liquidated before expensively assembled relaunches hit the shelves. You do not actually know what is there contributing to ongoing working capital.

High stock shrinkage – loss and damage have a higher incidence when stock is not correctly monitored and inventory levels are kept high – harder to miss.

Stock accuracy - cycle and annual stock counts are difficult to execute and usually provide unwanted shocks at reporting period ends.

Efficiency -  when warehouse capacity utilisation above 80%, operational efficiency stalls and soon plummets. Picking becomes a hazard and the warehouse simply does not have sufficient doors to move goods in and out.

When supply chain processes are inefficient and specifically inventory build decisions are not fully assessed and evaluated, you inevitably overstock as planners do not know what else they should do to protect sales and customer service. Conversely, when this happens you actually lose sales and offer poor customer service.

Does this provide the basis for a profitably growing business? Of course not but so many companies remain oblivious to the processes applied and decisions that are taken that bulk-out the supply chain.

Image courtesy of photostock at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: Customer service, FMCG, Pharma, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics

FMCG Supply Chains: Searching for the next “big thing” – it’s here!

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jul 27, 2016

I had an informal discussion with a small group of FMCG Supply Chain VP/Directors last week. I well remember the occasion as it was the day UK had its annual summer but the discussion was memorable for more than that fact. After rushing back to base in the inevitable evening rain with my briefcase as the only shelter I wrote out some notes from the session and they worried me.

Supply chains have moved on a long way from the early days when bits and pieces from other usually incongruous functions were glued together to form a nascent coherent function. I cannot list the huge number of initiatives that have taken place in the intervening years but some global supply chains are so slick that even sales people are almost impressed! Not all new ideas resulted in sustainable changes but some of the more obvious candidates like S&OP, corporate buying, ERP deployment and 3PLP partnerships have more than earned a return on the investment.

Unfortunately, you cannot stand still and supply chains everywhere are continuing to eke out incremental improvements in some of the more mature cases or substantial step changes in those less developed. Some companies clearly have plenty of scope for improvement but what about those who are at the top end of the Gartner Oscars list?

Is there anything left for Supply Chain VPs and Directors to achieve? Has all the cutting edge, innovative stuff happened? Are there really no more storming, monster initiatives coming over the hill? Is this as good as supply chain is going to get?

Talking of monsters, let me go back to the senior group discussion I mentioned at the top of the page.  S&OP and its younger sibling Integrated Business Planning have stabilised virtually all of the major multinational supply chains. Bringing a degree of discipline across all functions and a smaller improvement in sales forecast credibility has helped companies squeeze positives in top and bottom line performance.

Heavy investment inFMCG_Supply_chain_analytics_inventory_stock.jpg ERP upgrades have added a degree of financial rigour and reliability to businesses although the underlying thought is that even now, nobody really gets value for money from those slick and shiny IT packages.

I can imagine all these hungry supply chain executives searching for something that can make a lasting difference. You know what? They are standing there while it’s raining soup but they’ve all got forks!

The one area which has been largely untouched by the various supply chain initiatives and IT tools is inventory. Boring, boring stock levels; the planning manager’s crutch, the sales manager’s obsession, the working capital bane of management finance managers lives.

You may argue your stock is under control. The level is the right number of weeks cover. The value is at or below the annual plan targets. Even the number of pallet spaces is on track at the 3PLP warehouse. All highly likely but are those stock levels really supporting the business or simply just propping it up? 

Look carefully and I think you will find it is the latter. Inventory will not be aligned with precise market activation and selling out plans and is therefore stifling rather than facilitating growth. All the numbers may apparently support the business objectives but look closely and you are likely to find very little science in how forward stock cover is defined and specifically by SKU.

There is a solution. A sensible low cost solution that works and tellingly, it has been designed by supply chain experts for supply chain people!

Put your forks away and read about SupplyVue supply chain analytics. This works!

Image courtesy of Ohmega1982 at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, S&OP, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, Integrated Business Planning

FMCG Inventory: Do you celebrate being Out Of Stock - OOS)?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Feb 17, 2016

Out of stocks? Excellent news and a huge relief for all concerned!

A celebration party or at least a few drinks should be the next immediate priority but only after a bath or shower……….. Being sentenced to serve time in the stocks in medieval times was a very public humiliation but certainly low cost and effective for the public purse. Stocks were popular across the world and their official use did not die out until the early 1900’s. If only they were available today.

Those found guilty of crimes would be locked in that one uncomfortable, immobile position for days or weeks in all weathers. Then came the fun part as the general public took great delight in throwing as much mouldy and rotten “stuff” at the incumbents. Anything was fair game to be thrown at or poured over these local miscreants. Honestly, anything!

Those who commit crimes today and benefit from soft Community Service Orders or holidays in Africa might think again if they were sentenced to sit in wooden stocks in the town opposite the pub they misbehaved in or shops from which they stole. In fact, if the stocks were placed next to waste recycling skips outside a fast food outlet you could make a thoroughly entertaining day out of it. “Hey kids, should we go to the beach or have a “muck-burger” and throw rubbish at the prisoners?” My yellow Marigold’s would be snapped on in seconds.

In FMCG companies, being out of stocks (OOS) generates quite opposite emotions. No celebrations or relief, just the knowledge that a valuable consumer probably walked away with a competitor product. Consider the infrastructure you have employed and paid for to place your product in front of the consumer face and your dismay should be weigh heavily.

FMCG_INVENTORY_SOP_COSTS_WORKING_CAPITAL.jpgIn all retail sectors there are multiple alternative purchase options. If you want a chocolate snack then you want it now. If you want a beer or wine with dinner you are not going to wait until you return home. If you have a headache you are not going endure the pain until your regular paracetamol is available. Consumers make purchase decisions in real time and you do not receive a second chance of securing their cash.

There are many causes of OOS including pure human error or simple transport challenges but regular OOS in your business demand a thorough backwards AND forwards review and assessment:

Forecast Accuracy & Bias – this is of course valuable data if calculated by SKU and with information available quickly to facilitate corrective actions. Only hearing about poor accuracy or persistent inaccuracy several weeks after it happened is a complete waste of time and energy.

Sales & Operational Planning (S&OP) – is your process robust and taking innovation and demand from all channels into account? Do you all operate to one set of numbers or are different departments chasing different targets? Do you have a future stock modelling element within the standard processes?

Route To Market (RTM) – whether this is for Traditional Trade (TT) or Key Accounts (KA); is your deployment efficient and fit for purpose. When did you last assess the relevance of your network? Are you holding the correct level of stock to satisfy the demand including seasonal variations?

All these elements and many more affect your ability to minimise OOS and maximise sales and all require a concerted team effort to continually drive out stock holding errors and drive up perfrormance. Your working capital performance is a pot of gold waiting for you.

I leave you with a motivational thought and image. What if those responsible for repetitive OOS were placed in wooden stocks for a few hours in the factory canteen area? Pass me those Marigolds!

Image courtesy of radnatt at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Performance Improvement, S&OP, Inventory Management & Stock Control