Supply Chain Blog

Supply Chain Performance: Budget Airlines and KPIs……

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jun 14, 2017

I have never been a fan of budget airlines and certainly not since one left me sleeping overnight in the back of beyond that is Luton Airport. That may be an exciting addition to a student’s back-pack holiday itinerary but when you have a glass back it is not so appealing.

Nevertheless, they do fly to or near to where I need to be and the prices are much cheaper if you book well in advance, don’t pay with a credit card, don’t carry any luggage, don’t eat or drink, wish to sit next to your wife or use the toilet (thank you Fascinating Aida).

So, once again I found myself on the busy Birmingham – Bucharest route after visiting the heiress and some things are inevitable on a no-frills airline. I know the dimensions of my carry-on bag but so many others either forget to check or think they will get away with a dayglo sausage the size of Sicily without paying the penalty fare. That’s how they make their money; last minute, extortion, take it or leave it.

My second frequent observation is that there is usually someone sitting in my seat when I board. Yes, they move when challenged but only to another seat which is not theirs either. I know some airlines do or did provide a free seating/chaos policy but when you have a seat allocated on the boarding pass, sit in it!

Finally, we are off the ground and ascending before soon the engines throttle back and this is when I want to shout out some helpful advice to the captain, “change gear now”. I know how planes work but that bit off take off always makes me uncomfortable. The beep of the seat belt sign going off leads to an immediate dash for the toilets (I hope they pre-paid) and a long line of shuffling bodies.

The line of casually shuffling bodies soon turns into a twitching queue of concern as the red toilet sign above the cabin remains illuminated. Phones are consulted to pass the time and refocus the mind; people even read the safety information booklet and the duty-free magazine which is anything but duty free, of course.

Finally, a Flight Attendant needs to transport a metal trolley on inedible stuff to the other end of the plane and realises she cannot possibly conquer the lavatory line and politely knocks on the toilet door. No answer. Another tap-tap-tap plus an enquiry if everything is OK also fails to change the indicator from no-go red to free flowing green. The red light seems to glow brighter as if to irritate those with crossed legs.

This is now serious as the inedible stuff is getting cold and more people are standing in the aisle than sitting in seats. The pilot is probably having to battle with the controls to keep the plane centrally balanced. Something must give and judging by the faces of the queuers, this will be very soon. The red light glows.

Then action; the queue is guided away from the toilet door and back behind the curtain. Male and female crew members are poised to open the door using the emergency switch and they don’t know what or whom they will find. The door is cracked open as male and female eyes strain to see which crew member will take the lead and help the possibly stricken passenger. The red light vanishes and the green for go appears above the curtain. Relief is at hand.

There’s nobody in the toilet. The grateful mass of people takes one step forwards as the end is finally near.

FMCG_SUPPLY_CHAIN_HUMOUR_KPI_ANALYTICS.jpgSo, what went wrong? Will the cleaning service at the destination find something a very unexpected item in the garbage area? Is someone hiding in the skin of the aeroplane plotting something nasty?

There was never anyone in the toilet in the first place and staff had forgotten to flick the switch to make it open for business. The red light stayed illuminated but it was not telling you what the real situation was with toilet occupancy and the impasse was allowed to go on for quite some time. The KPI (kay pee aye) was showing red but it was not telling you the reality and certainly not everything.

Don’t always believe your KPIs are telling you the whole story; challenge them routinely. They are frequently an indication of performance at a certain moment in time and a longer-term view is necessary as the business evolves. If your business is in trouble you may need a set of Recovery KPIs whereas a booming business on a roll may need a set which is far more forward thinking and aggressive. Supply Chain Analytics help you take the longer term view.

Blindly believing long term over or under performance can see your company quickly performance go down the pan.

Image courtesy of phasinphoto at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, Humour, Performance Improvement, Pharma, KPI, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Analytics

Interim Management & Consultancy – What's the difference?

Posted by Michael Thompson on Thu, May 25, 2017
At Enchange, we have provided many supply chain interim managers for clients over the years. I was discussing our supply chain interim management services with a client recently and she asked whether she should be hiring interim managers or consultants.
 
We had a long chat and it turned out that interim managers were the right solution for her requirement.  The main reason in this case was that she insisted in retaining total control of the project and the key need was for expert resource to deliver a number of work stream projects.

So, for anyone else facing a similar dilemma here are seven key differences between interim management and consultancy:
  1. Notice  Interim managers are often placed at short notice.  Consultancy contracts usually take several months to agree and commence.
  2. Terms of reference  Interim management assignments nearly always commence with ‘implementation-driven’ terms of reference.  Consultancy contracts nearly always involve a process of analysis and usually include design work.  For an interim management contract, the analysis has usually been undertaken by the client.
  3. Project work  For project work, consultancy projects provide expertise not available in the company.  Interim management projects could normally be carried out by client personnel but resource is usually a constraint.
  4. Executive power  Interim managers are often called upon to demonstrate strong leadership from the outset of an assignment and can have a large degree of executive power.  Tough people decisions are sometimes made quickly.  It is unusual for a consultant to exercise executive authority.
  5. Client relationship  Typically interim managers become part of the client team quickly and identify totally with the needs of the client company.  Consultants, while always working closely with clients, often maintain an ‘arms-length’ relationship with client staff and identify totally with project deliverables.
  6. Contract duration  Interim management contracts are typically of longer duration than consultancy contracts.  However, the maximum duration for any assignment should not exceed 18-24 months.
  7. Fee rates are typically lower for interim management contracts.  At Enchange our rates for top quality interim supply chain managers certainly are lower.

 users guide to interim management

Tags: FMCG, Interim Management, Performance Improvement, Pharma, Michael Thompson, Supply Chain

Top 10 Times You Need Supply Chain Interim Management

Posted by Michael Thompson on Fri, May 12, 2017
Supply Chain Interim ManagementI have been talking to a number of supply chain executives during the last few weeks and something of a theme has emerged.
The theme is the immediate need for highly skilled supply chain resource, available at short notice, with the flexibility to switch off the resource at wil..….and at fee rates comparable to existing resource. “So nothing unreasonable there”, I thought.

What we actually discussed was supply chain interim management and how the placing of a specific skilled resource can have a dramatic postive impact on an organisation. We went on to discuss the typical roles that supply chain executives are currently demanding.  

With this and our recent experience with clients, I offer the following top 10 supply chain interim management roles:
  1. Resource gap. Bridging a gap prior to a full time appointment being made.  This was mentioned by everyone – “we need a planning manager …. now”.
  2. Backfill. To temporarily backfill a position because the incumbent manager is about to be seconded to a project or may be emabrking on maternity leave. “We have a large project that has started (ERP projects were mentioned a number of times) & we need an interim Head of Supply Chain”.
  3. Project Managing a specific project that would normally be carried out by company personnel but experienced resource is a constraint.  This is a common need and mentioned frequently.
  4. Temporary or part-time operational assignments the need for which will end, do not justify a full time employee or are designed to coach and train a new manager. 
  5. Holding the fort in a situation where company strategy is not decided and operational roles are unclear while the business must keep going forwards.
  6. Crisis. Managing a crisis when a unexpected event occurs, e.g. dismissal, death or unexpected departure.
  7. Post-acquisition or merger management prior to establishment of the full management team.
  8. Pre-sale management of a company or business unit in preparation for a sale.
  9. Urgent change management of strategy, cost, structure, organisation, process etc., when an external threat is recognised. e.g. sudden loss of market share, competitive move, unsustainable debt position, hostile take-over bid, etc.
  10. Turnaround management or ‘company doctor’ when a permanent position is inappropriate or the role may be perceived as too risky to attract a permanent candidate.
My discussions were with a relatively small number of people so I would welcome any further comments or indeed, requests for assistance.

 

Tags: FMCG, Interim Management, Performance Improvement, Pharma, Michael Thompson, Supply Chain

Global FMCG Supply Chain Transformed by Analytics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Apr 05, 2017

The Challenge

A leading global FMCG company undertook an aggressive supply chain improvement programme across 150 markets. The objective was 100% alignment of worldwide operational activities with company strategy and objectives. Not an insignificant task! 

The Problem

The organisation routinely calculated and published multiple KPIs and targets, but a lack of data integrity, accessibility and insightful reporting limited supply chain progress. Data was ‘scattered’ across multiple sources including enterprise ERP, market ERP, multiple factory systems and MI systems. No shortage of data but a severe dearth of insight and information.

In several markets, the organisation was suffering from volatile and highly variable short-term supply chain plans and an excess of finished goods inventory, despite a stable and predictable consumption. The ways of working within the supply chain and the interactions externally were traditional, with operating practices and decision making analysis unchanged for far too many years.

The Solution

Engagement with key stakeholders across the business established the corporate need and critical success factors for the analysis. A Toolset & suite of SKU-level Dashboards was developed, focussing on demand, planning, materials, production & execution. Company data was extracted into the toolset to provide information leading to appropriate actions. New monthly reporting and analysis revealed significant inventory reduction opportunities and importantly, operational management had the confidence to drive the required changes with a far greater understanding of potential outcomes.

sc_transformation_supplyvue_updated.pngThe Winning Tool

SupplyVue is a revolutionary supply chain analytics solution.

  • SupplyVue uses existing data to analyse and diagnose problems and successes in the supply chain.
  • SupplyVue provides a suite of tools and dashboards to model different inventory, financial and service level scenarios.
  • SupplyVue provides the visibility, data, information and business case to drive changes in the supply chain while fully understanding potential trade-offs.
  • SupplyVue enables provides visibility across the end-to-end supply chain to deliver better service to internal and external stakeholders.

The Result

Hard work, patience and trust in the analytics tool provided:

  • Improved forecasting accuracy.
  • Senior management tools to set informed policy.
  • For the first time, planners had powerful and relevant tools to perform root cause analysis of supply chain issues.

The big one? The company achieved an inventory reduction of 40% (yes, forty) in 12 markets amounting to US$ 200 million. Not too shabby eh?

Plus, something that is difficult to measure. SupplyVue raised the morale of supply chain staff who were now able to offer intelligent and assured solutions rather than shoulder shrugs and excuses.

The Future

Would you like to read more about analytics?

Supply Chain Analytics

SupplyVue

The Pathway

How to transform your supply chain?

The Next Important Step

Enchange can help you transform your supply chain, the overall business and personal ambitions!

To find out how we can help you and to enquire about our wide range of supply chain and related services please click here and contact us.

Image courtesy of Enchange.com

Tags: Customer service, FMCG, KPI, Supply Chain, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics

Supply Chain: The benefits of Interim Management

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Mar 29, 2017

Interim SC Expert at Hand Netsize resized 600Interim Management is an approach used by companies to “make things happen” within a clear budget and without the headaches of recruiting a full time employee (FTE).  The benefits are numerous but initially……

Immediate access to expert supply chain skills and experience in your sector.

No hidden extras. You pay the daily fee rate and expenses; no more, no less.

Training for your staff to ensure supply chain knowledge and skills imparted and retained.

Experienced supply chain interim managers available now at all levels of seniority.

Remove internal hurdles and barriers to change.

International experience gained from working in many countries, companies and in relevant sectors.

Motivated to achieve results to tight time and cost objectives.

Maintain the resource while you need it without any financial burden at contract end.

Avoid permanent employee costs which are significant.

No inconvenient holidays, training courses or conferences.

Ability to challenge your supply chain status quo and make sustainable change in the business.

Generate savings and efficiency improvements in a short timescale.

Expectations should high be as you are buying international expertise.

Make your business prepared for the competition in difficult economies.

Excellent return on investment.

No political axe to grind and no bias; straightforward advice and actions.

Take a look at the Enchange approach to Interim Management, eave your details via the contact form and we will call you back. If you are not sure you need Interim Management then you probably do!

Tags: FMCG, Interim Management, Dave Jordan, Performance Improvement, Pharma, Supply Chain, CEE

Supply Chains – Managing internal & external 3/4PLP expectations

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Feb 22, 2017

American sit-coms. With very few exceptions I personally do not find them at all funny. At times the funniest part is hearing the hilarious canned laughter when nothing in the least bit humorous occurs. MASH, Taxi and Cheers are the only sit-coms out of hundreds that managed to connect with my sense of humour. This is a personal thing of course but I do not like Raymond and I never got into Friends or what I consider its males deceased sequel, The Golden Girls.

Maintaining the comedic theme, not everyone likes Donald Trump either. The recently installed POTUS has certainly ruffled some feathers and while I am not going to dwell on the content of what he has done or said, the fact is that he is essentially doing what he said he was going to do. The Donald was voted in on certain promises and he appears to be trying to deliver. That ends my toe dipping into American comedy and politics (is there a difference anyway?) and now to Supply Chain stuff!

SUPPLY_CHAIN_3PLP_4PLP.jpgSo how is the above relevant to Supply Chains across the globe? In preparation to outsource or renew transport and/or warehousing contracts to 3PLPs or 4PLPs, an important part of the process is gathering the views and expectation of the key stakeholders. This will ensure the tender process and tender documentation are designed specifically for the company in question and also in good time.

Even within a small FMCG company board team the motivation for outsourcing will vary widely.This table shows where priority interests may lie across the management team and with customers. There is no guarantee any outsourcing arrangement will achieve one or more of these benefits but each is possible.

 4pl-3pl-expectations-supply-chain.jpg

As you can see, individual functions may have very different expectations from outsourcing the corporate logistics operations. Of course, everyone in the team should be working for the best all round company performance but these are the benefits at the core of their functional expertise and requirements. For example, lower working capital will excite the Finance Director but will be met with a blank stare from S&M colleagues.

A key step at the start of an outsourcing process is to find out what the internal and external stakeholders expect and equally importantly, tell them what they can expect in reality. Managing the various and often competing expectations will be an important task for the outsourcing team to avoid wasteful post project debate and mudslinging. Care though, benefits will not be delivered from day 1 so ensure the current and following annual plans reflect a sensible phasing.

If the project delivers broadly what was agreed after the stakeholder interviews there will be no place for any board room dramas or even alternative facts!

Image courtesy of vectorolie at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Logistics Service Provider, Dave Jordan, Humour, 3PLP, 4PL

Supply Chains – A second look: What do all those initials really mean?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Feb 08, 2017

In common with many business functions Supply Chains adopt multiple initials and/or acronyms to describe various tasks and processes they manage on a daily basis. Those not familiar with SC-speak will often sit bemused as various initials are quoted and debated and then usually blamed for some tenuous lost sales claimed by Sales and Marketing.

Here I take a fresh look at just a small selection of those Supply Chain initials and acronyms.

SC – Super Colleagues. Well, I may be biased but that is what you usually find. Supply Chain people must react to wildly varying demands and impossible timings but more often than not they succeed to get stock to the right place at the right time.

SOP - Supports Outstanding Performance. If you do not follow an S&OP process and your business is doing well and is robust then a pat on the back is deserved. However, if your business is struggling then you might consider the benefits of S&OP which can make all the difference.

IBP – Irritating But Productive. Often considered to be a more mature version of S&OP, Integrated Business Planning can be similarly difficult to get started but when everything clicks, business benefits.

Supply_Chain_FMCG_Initials.jpgSAP - Spreadsheets Are Preferred. The use of spreadsheets is prevalent in many businesses and equally common is the number of CEO’s who believe spreadsheets are NOT being used in their workplace! They almost certainly are but what can you do about this?

IKA- Irritating, Keep Away. In mature Western European markets, big name International Key Accounts are firmly established but in many other parts of the world the reality is quite the reverse. Traditional Trade is a very important part of many developing businesses yet most fail to pay sufficient attention to the continued growth potential of the TT channel.

SKU - Sales Keep “Upping”. Introducing new SKUs really should be a cross business decision taken within the context of S&OP and with sound financial analysis. Sadly, this does not happen very often as businesses rack up lengthy SKU lists where the tail items do not even pay for themselves in turnover, margin or profit.

KPI - Keeping People Interested. The adage of “if you don’t measure then you cannot improve” is certainly true here. Take care to manage your KPI’s closely and frequently but make sure you have a set which ensures everyone knows how they impact collective team performance and results. Visibly reward against the relevant KPIs and your staff will keenly follow them.

ERP – Everyone Requires Products. The whole purpose of your Enterprise Resource Planning is to get your products to the right place at the right time and at optimum cost. Occasionally, priorities must be made between demanding customers and a good ERP will guide your decisions.

PLP -  People Loading Products. Think long and had before outsourcing your outbound logistics operations to a 3rd party as they may not be ready to take on your business, seamlessly.  Prepare thoroughly and ensure you know exactly what you want from them and the relationship. A big step that is difficult to reverse without pain so be careful!

WMS - Where’s My Stock? Your 3PLP partner should be left to run their own business as that is why you pay them. However, you need to be involved in the stock counting process or you will lose sales and experience costly year-end write offs.

4PLP - 4 People Loading Products. If you have successfully used 3PLPs for some time you might wish to take a look at what a 4PLP can offer to the business. This is certainly not for everyone but can be very cost effective.

RTM - Retail Takes Money. Whether your focus is on IKA or TT how you manage your distribution network will be a key driver of your success in the market place. It is a fact that companies spending time and effort getting their developing market TT distributor networks in good order are more successful.

FIFO – Find It, Fuss Over. When you (or your 3PLP) operate a tight warehousing operation you will know where your stock sits, how old it is and what needs to move out to avoid write off costs and the inevitable poor customer service.

OTIF - Often The Invoice Fails. If you fail to deliver orders on time and in full you invite the customer to challenge the invoice and delay payment until you have made financial adjustments.

There are many, many more examples of SC-speak but this set will do for a KO so TTFN!

Image courtesy of boulemonademoon at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: SKU, FMCG, Route to Market, Dave Jordan, KPI, Traditional Trade, S&OP, Logistics Management, Distribution, Inventory Management & Stock Control

Supply Chain Analytics: Sprouts, Imodium & Harry Potter

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jan 18, 2017

Christmas and new year holidays seem a long way behind. The decorations have been squeezed back into their boxes for another year and Slade, Cliff, Bing, Bowie and others are safely back in their CD cases. Turkeys around the world are rejoicing as much as the children who do not have to tackle Brussels Spouts for another 12 months.

 

As ever, platform 9 at London’s Kings Cross station is a lonely place jam-packed full of people. Fellow commuters all with the same futile hope of securing a double seat with a table and a charging point nearby. A seat of any kind would be a bonus on your daily commute out of London to Cambridge on the 07.44 but at least this train will run and is on time. This must be the only form of transport globally where you can pay a premium seat price to stand next to a blocked toilet. Enjoy!

 

Blue Monday, even the odorous toilet spot has been taken so you are further relegated to the unheated bicycle area which must have been designed for Eskimos with unicycles. Settled as well as it is going to get, your thoughts turn to the new year ahead and the depressing expectation of the same old operational problems and challenges popping up. The slow chug-chug of the train brings the first lines of Bohemian Rhapsody to mind as an apt description of how you feel:

 

Is this the real life?SUPPLY_CHAIN_ANALYTICS_IT_FMCG.jpg
Is this just fantasy?
Caught in a landslide,
No escape from reality.

 

This sneaks into your head repeatedly even as the chugging slows and Cambridge eases into view. Time to snap out of it and get the business hat firmly on. At least the new ERP is in place and after a 3-month error-ridden ramp-up it should be ready to support the business a little better than the in-house, low cost, back of a fag packet version that lasted more than 10 years. There is a lot riding on this expensive ERP; this ERP will finally tell us what is really happening in our supply chain.

 

Well no, it will not.

 

Don’t worry, you have not invested heavily in the wrong software. The ERP will do exactly what is says on the tin which is probably in the German language.

 

Thinking back to that train toilet, consider for a moment that your ERP is Imodium – a fantastic product which does exactly what it claims on the pack. You can trust Imodium to get you from A to B where B is not necessarily where you want to be but it is a place of distinct safety and comfort. Imodium does not tell you what went wrong inside nor does it tell you what to do differently to avoid the same effect at a later date. In short, Imodium slows down your business but doesn’t tell you what is wrong.

 

What you need is some form of Supply Chain Analytics to sit on top of your ERP/Imodium – not a substitute. Your new ERP will have automated your usual ways of working but this seldom leads to huge improvement and often, performance visibly worsens with the increased noise and operator nervousness in the planning processes. Inevitably, the forecast takes the blame. The issues lie within the supply chain processes, the set-up of the IT systems and how add-on tools are being used. To protect themselves, your supply chain managers are buffering supply chains with unnecessary inventory and backside-protecting lead-times.

 

Analytics uses your data to analyse and diagnose what is happening in your supply chain by providing a suite of tools and dashboards to model the implications of your decision making. Achieving extra visibility across the supply chain inevitably delivers better service, lower costs, happier people and a supply chain that is easier to manage.

Analytics is transforming the way organisations improve performance and gain competitive advantage, every day. Even on those cold, wet Mondays when you are at the station contemplating another standing commute. Take a look at Supply Chain Analytics and you will find yourself with exclusive access to Kings Cross Platform 9¾ and we all know what magic is possible there!

Image courtesy of Poulsen Photo at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Analytics, IT

FMCG Planning: If you like chocolate, now is the time!

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jan 11, 2017

Overeaten chocolate during the holidays but still want some more? Get yourself and a large blue IKEA bag down to your local supermarket as chocolate is heavily discounted. Easter is not far away this year so why not save a little cash and stock up now - use by dates permitting, of course!

Post Christmas I have been taking a look at International Key Account retailers and seeing how they are coping in the continuing economic squeeze. One question came to mind after seeing well over 20 outlets of various retailers. What do they all do with all that chocolate and other Christmasy confectionery?

Planning Chocolate Sale The same scenario is also present after Easter. Shelf after shelf and gondola after gondola of seasonal chocolate in all sorts of formats, shapes and sizes. Not simple packaging either and it must cost a fortune to pack a 15cm tall chocolate Santa or rabbit into a multi-coloured coffret. To be fair it is not just one manufacturer who has suffered a forecasting blip, every major name chocolate producer appears unable to get it right. For all of them Christmas must be a peak period and one that can make or break the year-end results and with no time left to remedy any sales deficit. Similarly, the timing can also place an un-provisioned hole in Q1 numbers even before you have taken down the decorations.

Of course, nobody wants to disappoint consumers and run out of stock at those peak periods but how can they afford the apparent over-stocking? If the goods are on consignment or “sale or return" then I can perhaps understand why retailers let displays hang around for several weeks. Even then I doubt the retailers would relish wasting valuable sales space on Easter themed chocolate into June and beyond.

Considering the power retailers have over producers I do not understand why stock is allowed to gather dust on shelves. Certainly, for many foodstuffs the listing contracts will contain clauses to withdraw stocks but usually only when the sell-by date approaches or off-take is ridiculously low.

What is the destiny of chocolate Santas and bunny rabbits after the sell-by date arrives? You cannot do much with it, can you? You cannot send it to a sink market in another country and with the vast majority of edibles you cannot recycle the stuff into fresh production as you could with washing powder, for example. If you have to write-off stock you have to pay to have it destroyed professionally and you frequently have to pay VAT on the stock value as if it was a sale.

Whatever the destiny of all that yummy chocolatey goodness, it is indicative of a lack of rigour in forecasting and/or sales expectations. Diverting some investment from stock that does not sell into taking a long, hard look at your Sales & Operational Planning (S&OP) process could offer a very rapid pay-back for those companies willing to break the chocolate losses mould.

As a step further, Supply Chain Analytics can help you to fully understand what is really happening in your peak periods and why you continue to miss your sales targets. Presently, there is a free of charge offer to analyse some of your data and expose the reality of your decision making.

Image courtesy of Nora Ashbee at Enchange.com 

 

 

Tags: FMCG, Christmas, Dave Jordan, Supply Chain, S&OP, Forecasting & Demand Planning, Supply Chain Analytics

An FMCG Distributor Is For Life: Not Just For Christmas

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Dec 21, 2016

Ok, so you are unlikley to see this on a car bumper sticker but FMCG Distributors will have a significant impact on your sales performance, probably your variable pay bonus and therefore your CEO aspirations! How have you treated your Distributors this year? Were they the usual pain in the proverbial - failing to achieve targets, not paying on time, always moaning about trading terms? Of course, some Distributors do fit this stereotype but others are keenly trying to be treated as and to be, equal partners in your business success. But do you see this?

How are things going in Q4? Have you fallen into the trap of the “sales bonus push”? Year end stock clearance FMCG Breaking all the supply and sales phasing rules you have been trying to drum into Distributors? Did you strictly maintain discipline on Sales & Operational Planning or did the last quarter deteriorate into a “sell whatever we've got in the warehouse” scenario?

Companies that spend time and effort in proactively guiding their Distributors, providing relevant training and support inevitably succeed in the market place. Yes, at the end of the day Distributors have to stand on their own two feet but so many FMCG companies assume an organisation calling itself an “FMCG Distributor” inherently knows how to properly support any specific business.

If you do not pay attention to the Traditional Trade (TT) distribution side of your business then you are asking for trouble and that trouble usually ends in divorce along with all the discontinuity baggage separation brings. You need to avoid your choice of Distributors becoming like the English Premier League where managers get about 5 minutes to make an impact before being shown the door. (Strange though, that all these football managerial failures usually find another highly paid role.)

So, as we approach a special time of the year why not think about your Distributors and ask yourself if you have given them a fair crack of the whip?  If not, then you might consider a New Year resolution to develop a strategy for mutual success. This is far better than continually highlighting deficiencies and using backward looking, discipline focussed KPIs to bash them on the head.

Sit down with your RTM Distributors regularly, evaluate their strengths and weaknesses and agree to do something about the latter. Simply running through a Route To Market evaluation together can work wonders in establishing trust and cooperation. Do yourself a favour and do this now before Q1 next year also becomes history.

Click on the RTM link below and go!

CTA RTM Free Download resized 600

Image courtesy of stock.xchnge at freeimages.com

Tags: FMCG, Route to Market, Dave Jordan, CEO, Performance Improvement, Supply Chain, S&OP, Distribution