Supply Chain Blog

Supply Chain Analytics: Sprouts, Imodium & Harry Potter

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Jan 18, 2017

Christmas and new year holidays seem a long way behind. The decorations have been squeezed back into their boxes for another year and Slade, Cliff, Bing, Bowie and others are safely back in their CD cases. Turkeys around the world are rejoicing as much as the children who do not have to tackle Brussels Spouts for another 12 months.

 

As ever, platform 9 at London’s Kings Cross station is a lonely place jam-packed full of people. Fellow commuters all with the same futile hope of securing a double seat with a table and a charging point nearby. A seat of any kind would be a bonus on your daily commute out of London to Cambridge on the 07.44 but at least this train will run and is on time. This must be the only form of transport globally where you can pay a premium seat price to stand next to a blocked toilet. Enjoy!

 

Blue Monday, even the odorous toilet spot has been taken so you are further relegated to the unheated bicycle area which must have been designed for Eskimos with unicycles. Settled as well as it is going to get, your thoughts turn to the new year ahead and the depressing expectation of the same old operational problems and challenges popping up. The slow chug-chug of the train brings the first lines of Bohemian Rhapsody to mind as an apt description of how you feel:

 

Is this the real life?SUPPLY_CHAIN_ANALYTICS_IT_FMCG.jpg
Is this just fantasy?
Caught in a landslide,
No escape from reality.

 

This sneaks into your head repeatedly even as the chugging slows and Cambridge eases into view. Time to snap out of it and get the business hat firmly on. At least the new ERP is in place and after a 3-month error-ridden ramp-up it should be ready to support the business a little better than the in-house, low cost, back of a fag packet version that lasted more than 10 years. There is a lot riding on this expensive ERP; this ERP will finally tell us what is really happening in our supply chain.

 

Well no, it will not.

 

Don’t worry, you have not invested heavily in the wrong software. The ERP will do exactly what is says on the tin which is probably in the German language.

 

Thinking back to that train toilet, consider for a moment that your ERP is Imodium – a fantastic product which does exactly what it claims on the pack. You can trust Imodium to get you from A to B where B is not necessarily where you want to be but it is a place of distinct safety and comfort. Imodium does not tell you what went wrong inside nor does it tell you what to do differently to avoid the same effect at a later date. In short, Imodium slows down your business but doesn’t tell you what is wrong.

 

What you need is some form of Supply Chain Analytics to sit on top of your ERP/Imodium – not a substitute. Your new ERP will have automated your usual ways of working but this seldom leads to huge improvement and often, performance visibly worsens with the increased noise and operator nervousness in the planning processes. Inevitably, the forecast takes the blame. The issues lie within the supply chain processes, the set-up of the IT systems and how add-on tools are being used. To protect themselves, your supply chain managers are buffering supply chains with unnecessary inventory and backside-protecting lead-times.

 

Analytics uses your data to analyse and diagnose what is happening in your supply chain by providing a suite of tools and dashboards to model the implications of your decision making. Achieving extra visibility across the supply chain inevitably delivers better service, lower costs, happier people and a supply chain that is easier to manage.

Analytics is transforming the way organisations improve performance and gain competitive advantage, every day. Even on those cold, wet Mondays when you are at the station contemplating another standing commute. Take a look at Supply Chain Analytics and you will find yourself with exclusive access to Kings Cross Platform 9¾ and we all know what magic is possible there!

Image courtesy of Poulsen Photo at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: FMCG, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Analytics, IT

An FMCG Distributor Is For Life: Not Just For Christmas

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Dec 21, 2016

Ok, so you are unlikley to see this on a car bumper sticker but FMCG Distributors will have a significant impact on your sales performance, probably your variable pay bonus and therefore your CEO aspirations! How have you treated your Distributors this year? Were they the usual pain in the proverbial - failing to achieve targets, not paying on time, always moaning about trading terms? Of course, some Distributors do fit this stereotype but others are keenly trying to be treated as and to be, equal partners in your business success. But do you see this?

How are things going in Q4? Have you fallen into the trap of the “sales bonus push”? Year end stock clearance FMCG Breaking all the supply and sales phasing rules you have been trying to drum into Distributors? Did you strictly maintain discipline on Sales & Operational Planning or did the last quarter deteriorate into a “sell whatever we've got in the warehouse” scenario?

Companies that spend time and effort in proactively guiding their Distributors, providing relevant training and support inevitably succeed in the market place. Yes, at the end of the day Distributors have to stand on their own two feet but so many FMCG companies assume an organisation calling itself an “FMCG Distributor” inherently knows how to properly support any specific business.

If you do not pay attention to the Traditional Trade (TT) distribution side of your business then you are asking for trouble and that trouble usually ends in divorce along with all the discontinuity baggage separation brings. You need to avoid your choice of Distributors becoming like the English Premier League where managers get about 5 minutes to make an impact before being shown the door. (Strange though, that all these football managerial failures usually find another highly paid role.)

So, as we approach a special time of the year why not think about your Distributors and ask yourself if you have given them a fair crack of the whip?  If not, then you might consider a New Year resolution to develop a strategy for mutual success. This is far better than continually highlighting deficiencies and using backward looking, discipline focussed KPIs to bash them on the head.

Sit down with your RTM Distributors regularly, evaluate their strengths and weaknesses and agree to do something about the latter. Simply running through a Route To Market evaluation together can work wonders in establishing trust and cooperation. Do yourself a favour and do this now before Q1 next year also becomes history.

Click on the RTM link below and go!

CTA RTM Free Download resized 600

Image courtesy of stock.xchnge at freeimages.com

Tags: FMCG, Route to Market, Dave Jordan, CEO, Performance Improvement, Supply Chain, S&OP, Distribution

FMCG CEO 2016 Letter to Santa Claus (aka Father Christmas)

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Dec 20, 2016

FMCG/Brewing/Pharma CEO Letter to Santa ClausDear Santa,

I have been a very good FMCG CEO this year, I promise. If you want, you can check with my shareholders. They know how good I have been this year. Apart from the out of stocks of course, oh and the little mistake when we had to write stock off and waste lots of our money. But that is not so bad is it? Other CEOs were naughty last year and they still got what they wanted from you.

I had better be honest because you will know if I am not telling the truth. We also had a problem starting S&OP and so our planning, forecast accuracy and sales were not very good. They were not really big problems so I hope you can forget about them this time, please. Next year I promise to do better, I do, honest.

I forgot about the Route To Market (RTM) mess we had in the peak sales months but that really was not my fault. I also promise to do something about RTM next year and make sure it works properly so people who buy our products are not disappointed again. I know it is bad when people come to buy our products and then spend their money on something else. I will talk to our distributors and Enchange and find out what we need to do.

I know, I know, when the new ERP computer system was switched on we were not really ready for the change but we did make it better as fast as possible. I did not think we needed any outside help for the new IT but I admit I was wrong. Next time I will get it right, hopefully without having any lost sales.

The factory thing was not my fault, I think. The factory man promised me lots of product but his machines kept breaking down at the wrong times and we had to wait for the fixing men to arrive. They took ages to get the machines working again and then they broke down again and again. No, it is not a very reliable factory, yet.

Does the warehouse problem count against me as well? We could not find our products when we wanted them and then when we did find them they were old and out of date and of no use. This was very sad but it will not happen again next year, I hope.

I have just read my message again to make sure I did not spell any words wrong and I see I was not as good as I thought. Actually, after reading this I am going to the chimney to take my stocking down and put it away in the Christmas storage box. I will try again next year, Santa.

Bye bye and Happy Christmas.

CEO FMCG

Image credit: HikingArtist.com

Tags: Route to Market, Christmas, Logistics Service Provider, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Performance Improvement, Traditional Trade, S&OP, Sales, Inventory Management & Stock Control

The Twelve Days of Supply Chain 2016

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Dec 19, 2016

On the first day of Christmas, 12 days of SC Xmas  Small2 copy resized 600
Enchange gave to me 
A robust S&OP. 

On the second day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the third day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the fourth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the fifth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the sixth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
A suite of KPI’s 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the seventh day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s,
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics, 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the eighth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
The RTM Tool, 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the ninth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics,
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the tenth day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Great Customer Service,
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the eleventh day of Christmas, 
Enchange gave to me 
Integrated Supply Chain, 
Great Customer Service, 
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

On the twelfth day of Christmas,                                                                          Enchange gave to me
APO Implementation
Integrated Supply Chain, 
Great Customer Service, 
Return on investment 
The RTM Tool, 
SupplyVue Analytics
A suite of KPI’s, 
Better bottom line, 
Streamlined logistics 
An ERP go-live,
Two fine consultants, 
And a robust S&OP.

Have you got your breath back? Finally, we wish you a very Merry Christmas and an increasinly prosperous New Year!

Image courtesy of Nora Ashbee at Enchange.com

Other seasonal posts:

Tags: Christmas, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, Performance Improvement, Supply Chain, S&OP, Forecasting & Demand Planning

FMCG CEO Christmas Gift: Implement S&OP – Slade style!

Posted by Dave Jordan on Fri, Dec 16, 2016

Christmas is coming around faster than ever and who better than Noddy Holder and Slade to give a Sales & Operational Planning (S&OP) process to your business as a present. This song has been heard at Christmas every year since 1973! If you have been living in a cave on a remote island and don't know the tune you can click here for the original, boring non-S&OP version.

1 2 3 4.......

Are you looking at your sales chart on the wall? Sales and Operational Planning
Is it the time you have to stop the fall?
You’ve tried overpaying salesmen,
You’ve loaded up the trade
Do you need to find a better way?

Chorus:
So here it is S&OP
Everybody should run one
Look to the future; how?
Six months or even one.

Are you guessing how much you’re going to sell?
Are you suffering high out of stock as well?
Does supply chain always tell you, pre-SOP is best?
So why not work together for a test?

Chorus:
So here it is S&OP
Everybody should run one
Look to the future; how?
Six months or even one.

What will the salesmen do
When they see their targets being met?
Ah ah
They’ll be changing the chart gradient on the wall.
Not for them will sales fall and fall.
When you implement S&OP you make quite a change
Looking back the old way will feel so strange.

Chorus:
So here it is S&OP
Everybody should run one
Look to the future ;  how?
Six months or even one.

Noddy knows best so why not find out about S&OP now and give your business the perfect Christmas gift.

Image courtesy of Nora Ashbee at Enchange.com

 

Tags: FMCG, Christmas, Dave Jordan, CEO, Humour, S&OP, Forecasting & Demand Planning

Supply Chain Analytics: The birth of a new Dawn, or Daniel

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Nov 02, 2016

Anyone expecting their first child has probably been told by a gloating-doting grandparent-to be that their lives are about to change dramatically. This is of course untrue as in reality dramatically is too simple a word and in any event, that “change” is far, far different than granny suggests. Your pre-natal life as you know it will become obsolete at the snip of a chord.

Sleep, sanity, social life and other activities beginning with “s” will soon become history as you become slaves to the mini-me you have created who appears to have over active exhaust systems at both ends. Night and day whizz past in a blur of endless demands for food and cleaning and screaming and that is just the husband.

Did you know what sex the little darling was before the big day or did you wait and see what would be delivered? Did you and the family try to predict boy or girl based on family history? You know, things like the first born is always a boy if the birth takes place in summer. Or, it must be a girl based on the size of the baby bump etc., etc.

Supply_Chain_Analytics_CEO_Planning.jpgDespite all the indicators and family history and old wives’ tales you got the sex of the baby wrong? Dear me, there are only 2 options after all! If you can get that 50/50 prediction wrong how on earth do people cope in the supply chain business when the number and type of variables is enormous? (You knew the segue was coming and there it is!)

What is going to happen in the future is always difficult to predict even remotely accurately.

Hold on a minute but what about all that Supply Chain data? Your Management Information System is running red hot; the KPI Dashboard has digital steam coming out of its ears and you can see numbers bursting out of the air vents on the top of the Data Warehouse. You have more data available than you can shake a USB Data Stick at!

The problem is that all those numbers and colour coded percentages help to tell you everything that has already happened in your Supply Chain. Good to know of course but isn’t it better to know why certain events happened and how they can be avoided in the future?

I can imagine your last S&OP meeting involved making considered changes to plans and activities to correct certain deficiencies or to take advantage of opportunities. All well and good but the internal operational deficiency you have is that you must wait weeks or months or longer to find out if your strategy was successful.

What you need is an analytical tool to take advantage of all that data and convert it into actionable information. A tool which allows you to diagnose the precise causes of past events and which allows you to model the probable results of your decisions into the future. These tools exist as cost effective cloud based solutions but most companies stubbornly remain convinced that their expensively installed MIS/ERP should be sufficient. Put simply, alone, they are not.

When you were thinking about starting a family if you knew which “tadpole” was most likely to win the race you would not be on a ladder hurriedly repainting the nursery blue!

Image courtesy of dream designs at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: CEO, Forecasting & Demand Planning, Supply Chain Analytics, IT

Fashion Retailers: Is inventory eating into your profits? (It is…)

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Aug 31, 2016

I touched on the problem of expanding UK waistlines a few blogs ago and the topic popped up again recently when I was out and about shopping for clothes – no, not me. This is not as regular an event as it may be for senior management but due to the imminent arrival of a few dry and summery days, I was in need of new shorts and T-shirts.

Nothing special or posy, just bog-standard items that do not have some sort of advertising logo blazoned across for which I receive no payment.  Similarly, I was keen to avoid those that look like someone has been assaulted by an ultimate, all-topping, deep-pan, soft-cheese pizza. Oh, and no fashionable rips and tears, either. Plain and simple and in one “quiet” colour; that’s me.

Fashion_retail_inventory_supply_chain_analytics.jpgIf I look at the internet – it’s all true there isn’t it? – then I am about the top end of average as long as it is not Christmas, Easter or holiday time. As everyone knows, bathroom scales do not work accurately during those periods and clothes shopping then is silly anyway. There started my rare shop for T-shirts and shorts in the medium/large size range. Should be relatively simple I thought as I started to dodge the bodies of the newly pedestrianised high street throng.

Alas, no BHS, no Austin Reed and now not even an Old Guys Rule to replenish my summer wardrobe but plenty of retail options remained. With a spring in my step I activated the soft hiss of the sliding doors and there I was in one of the largest clothes retailers in the game. No names mentioned in case it jinxes the chain and we lose another big name!

The choice in style and colour was good and the racks were very well stocked with lines and lines of T-shirts and shorts. Then the problem hit me. Although I was looking for M or L sizes the only items available were extra small, small, extra-large, XXL and even XXXL! (Don’t get me started on why extra small and XXXL must be the same price.) This was not an isolated case and after checking I realised this was true for the gaudy coloured stuff and the “stylish” pre-damaged items. What is going on?

This may only be a sample of 1 but this major UK chain with several international franchise locations is probably operating with several hundred thousands of Euros hanging on racks with only a small chance of being sold anytime soon. Sizes which fit a large proportion of the population are out of stock (OOS) presenting a huge lost sales problem. And it is not just T-shirts and shorts; have a look at hugely expensive suits, coats and shoes. The same may also be true of the ladies’ fashions but I decided against browsing those racks.

In FMCG, if your Heinz beans are OOS then you pick up HP or an own label offering in the same outlet and it does not really impact on the retailer or the consumer. Not so in clothing retail where alternative options are dotted around the adjacent shopping centres. Seeing multiple Mr. Averages walk out of your store due to OOS while a host of other sizes hang around is just plain daft.

How long does that working capital flap about in the stores eating into your profits? Inevitably, the seasons change and with that the styles adjust. New designs and new ranges are introduced but where do you put them? Eventually, to create space you have to withdraw the S/XXXL stock and either marginally discount it internally or more heavily with a third party.

The problem is not only about having too few top sellers but also about how you plan for the success of the entire size range and avoid over-stocking profit guzzlers. Nobody has a functioning crystal ball but you can apply some clever supply chain analytics to ensure your store inventory is designed for success and not for failure.

Image courtesy of mapichai at freedigitalphotos.net

Tags: CEO, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, Integrated Business Planning, retail

FMCG – Hunkering down for Supply Chain Analytics

Posted by Dave Jordan on Wed, Aug 24, 2016

Have you ever “hunkered down”? I remember being asked to hunker down during a supply chain training course many years ago and I had no idea what I was supposed to do. Eventually I had to ask as failing to follow the hunker downwards request appeared to be causing a bit of a problem for the presenter.

This hunkering failure occurred during one of the many versions of the Beer Game in which I have taken part or run over the years. Anyone who has been involved with supply chain activities will probably have taken part in the Beer Game, or the Moussy Game as it is sometimes known in dry countries of the Middle East.

What does the beer game do? The rules are relatively simple and in summary the overall objective is to meet consumer demand for cases of beer in a complex, extended supply chain while controlling unplanned expense on back orders and inventory. The game involves four overlapping and inter-dependent supply chains, i.e. manufacturing, distribution, procurement and a retail outlet. There is a cost penalty for holding excess stock and any backlog unfulfilled orders.

Players rely on colleagues in the other departments to do the right things for the business but frustration soon surfaces. Usually, things do not go well and players feel frustrated because they are not getting the results they expect. Assumptions are made about consumer demand and erratic patterns emerge as backlogs mount and/or massive unnecessary stocks accumulate. It was at this stage in the game I was told to “hunker down……….”.

Does that sound like your own supply chain – not the hunkering bit? Frustration is common between departments who all aim to do the right thing but only have the necessary data and information to do the right thing for their specific area of responsibility at that specific time. Even after careful consideration and informed debate, the real effect of an adjustment can only be seen in the future.

supply_chain_analytics_fmcg_inventory_performance.jpgIF - a big if -  nothing else changes and all assumptions are correct and accurate then there is a chance the desired effect will develop. However, life is not like that and certainly not supply chain life. What can happen?

New launches kick-in and are successful, or not.

Competition by definition is designed to disrupt your plans.

The weather turns out rather different to the forecast.

The economy takes a turn up or down.

Factories, 3PLPs and distributors all suffer performance variability.

Customers and consumers change their needs and habits.

Etc., etc., etc., this list really is endless. Absolutely anything can happen to turn apparently sensible decisions into foolish, forecast failure.

Hey, what about all that IT we have? Doesn’t that help us understand what is going on? This should tell us what is really going to happen in supply chains? No, not necessarily. Common supply chain IT tells us what has happened, what is happening, where and when but not precisely why an event happened or what will happen.

Subtle differences perhaps but to up your game you need to hunker down with Supply Chain Analytics to gain a full unexpurgated understanding of how changes you make today will impact the future and more importantly, how you can change that future.

Yes, you can.

Image courtesy of Enchange at Enchange.com

Tags: Customer service, FMCG, CEO, Inventory Management & Stock Control, Supply Chain Analytics, IT

Olympic level FMCG performance or simply distributor over-stocking?

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Aug 16, 2016

Wow, four years have flashed past since the London Olympic bunting was packed away and the metal polish put back under the sink. The 2016 Rio games are well and truly underway and the cauldron flame is alight for the duration.

Over 11,000 competitors from nearly 200 countries and even a refugee team have been getting up ridiculously early to sweat and train at whatever sport they excel. That is a huge number of really fit people who are focused on being in peak condition for a once in a lifetime event that might last less than 10 seconds or several hours.

Taking the 100m sprint as an example; the top sprinters will have 4 opportunities to perform. A combined window of 40 seconds to reflect all that money, time and effort that has been expended to qualify and perform to the best of their ability. What if they stumble or don’t hear the starting gun, drop the baton or worse still, get disqualified?

FMCG_INVENTORY_DISTRIBUTORS_CEO.jpgAll that planning and careful preparation to get to the final of the competition only to be disqualified for being a little twitchy waiting for the starting pistol to crack out loud. Or, sticking your foot just a millimeter into the triple jump plasticine. Hey, don’t worry, there will be another chance for you in Tokyo………

You are not in the final to perform in front of millions of people watching around the world. Nobody will see you perform and instead of your stock rising and attracting more lucrative advertising deals you will be remembered as that poor guy with the twitch or that girl with the too-big training shoes.

Cue segue. The global economy seems permanently stuck in “weak and unpredictable” performance mode with no obvious way out even for the dis-United Kingdom of Brexit. Imagine you are a yellow CEO Pac-Man (do they have female Pacs?) nibbling away at the dots and then getting stuck in a dead-end. What next, nowhere to go, panic, panic! Despite this, many CEOs will be under extreme pressure to “make the numbers”. How exactly? While all this Olympic activity is taking place is your physical FMCG stock rising as we move through the second half of the year?

Despite what sales and finance colleagues will spout, there is a limit to how much stock can you push into your trading channels and this includes International Key Accounts. Coercing (or more likely forcing) a distributor to take more and more stock may appear an easy option but it is an unsustainable action that damages your business in the long run.

At some stage a brave CEO has to say enough is enough and start a period of controlled destocking despite the effect this will have on top and bottom lines. Loading the trade does not happen by accident; you know you are doing it so stop deluding yourself and HQ and do something! Put a stake in the ground that sets the tone for the future.

You may believe that excess inventory means you will never be out of stock or off the shelves but this is not the case. The available stock will inevitably be unbalanced and just when you expect your long planned relaunch to fly out of the blocks and hit the shelf you also twitch and realise you have 9 months’ stock of the old product sitting in distributors warehouses.

What a disappointment. A waste of money, time and effort, i.e. an Olympic gold medal-sized goof and HQ is unlikely to give you another chance in a lot less than 4 years’ time.

Image courtesy of stockimages at freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: FMCG, CEO, Distribution, RTM Assessment Tool, Inventory Management & Stock Control

FMCG & Shakespeare? Macbeth S&OP Soliloquy

Posted by Dave Jordan on Mon, Apr 25, 2016

As we one again celebrate St George's Day and the 400th birthday of William Shakespeare (also the date he died, coincidentally) what would the great bard think about Sales & Operational Planning (S&OP) in FMCG businesses? Let us take a look......

S&OP ala Shakespeare

Is this a plan which I see before me, 
The numbers are as we planned? Come, let me see.
They are not, I see two numbers, still.
Art thou not following S&OP, incredible!
Your “gut feeling” could be right? or is this but
A plan of the sales mind, a false creation,
Proceeding from the bonus-obsessed brain?
I see this yet, inform others
As this which you cannot ignore.
Thou shall assure me S&OP gets going;
And the S&OP instrument I want used!
Mine eyes see the foolish lack o' consensus,
Or else worthless at best; I see this ill,
And on thy supply plan remove doubts of “could”,
Which was not so before. There's no such thing:
It is the demand plan which conforms
Thus to mine eyes. I must see minutes recorded
Pre-SOP must go ahead, and ERP is in use.
The gaps could be deep; discussion eliminates
Take extra offerings, and work even harder,
Align by this meeting, calm the sales wolf.
More minutes you attach, thus with stealthy pace
With colleagues at your sides, a single plan design
Move on to the Board. Ensure a firm-set plan,
Fear not our quips, the way we talk, no fear.
Some small adjustments we may talk about.
And take the present plan and deploy as,
This now suits the Board. S&OP is done, and leads
Towards defeat of those where S&OP lives not.

For fans of the man himself, here is the original William Shakespeare work.

Is this a dagger which I see before me,
The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee.
I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.
Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible
To feeling as to sight? or art thou but
A dagger of the mind, a false creation,
Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
I see thee yet, in form as palpable
As this which now I draw.
Thou marshall'st me the way that I was going;
And such an instrument I was to use.
Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses,
Or else worth all the rest; I see thee still,
And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood,
Which was not so before. There's no such thing:
It is the bloody business which informs
Thus to mine eyes. Now o'er the one halfworld
Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse
The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates
Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder,
Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf,
Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace.
With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design
Moves like a ghost. Thou sure and firm-set earth,
Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear
Thy very stones prate of my whereabout,
And take the present horror from the time,
Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives:
Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives.

For a view of the lighter side of all things supply chain please click here.

 

Tags: FMCG, CEO, Humour, Performance Improvement, S&OP, Sales