Supply Chain Blog

7 Reasons for Securing an Interim Supply Chain Manager in CEE

Posted by Dave Jordan on Tue, Dec 14, 2010

 

The recession rumbles on and on and on. Greece, then Ireland; who is next in line for a heavy duty IMF/EU bale out? Should Spain become the next country to hit the financial wall that would send a few shock waves around Europe.

Interim Manager SoftedgeSo why is Interim Management an opportunity particularly in CEE at present? Mainly as a result of the economic conditions numerous companies have folded this year and a similar number have been taken over or merged with others. There is more of each to come, I fear. Obviously companies that go bust are too late to be helped although I am not sure too many actually sought professional help and guidance.

Those companies and Private Equity players merging or buying in this period need to have their new businesses in good shape to ensure the ROI in the contract deal has a chance of coming to fruition. When the green shoots of recovery actually start looking like shrubs shareholders and PE owners will expect their pound of flesh.

One route to accelerating and establishing integration and realignment is to use the services of an Interim Manager. Below are 7 reasons why hiring an Interim Manager (IM) can be of benefit to companies in CEE:

  1. Return On Investment. No, it is not more expensive than hiring full time (FTE) or temporary employees. Take all recruitment and employment costs into account and you will appreciate how efficient IM costs can be. You pay your employees for turning up for work whereas IM are paid against set objectives and delivery. (Consider the cost if you make the wrong choice of FTE and have to go through a lengthy, disruptive and expensive exit process.)
  2. Speed. Senior Interim Managers are readily available and located in CEE. You do not have to waste time going through a lengthy search and selection process with a fee-taking headhunter.
  3. Expertise. Interim Managers are often seasoned professionals with deep operational experience. A vast majority will have successfully held senior roles in blue-chip organisations for long periods.  No training is required; you get a “vertical start-up”.
  4. Objectivity. Interim Managers are able to look at a given situation with a fresh set of eyes and will not be afraid of “treading on toes” or telling the boss there is a better way!
  5. Accountability. Interim Managers are not there to advise. They are in place to handle a specific project or a department in transition. Unlike full time employees they are very comfortable at being rewarded (or not) based on black and white objective achievement.
  6. Effectiveness. Possibly the most obvious contribution of IM. Once the Board has given a mandate to carry out a task they will get on and do it without struggling through a bout of inertia. “Just Do It” sums this up nicely. 
  7. Commitment. Interim Managers remuneration means they have a direct financial stake in the assignment. They are not there to make friends or pave the way for recruitment. They wish to do the job well, get paid and move onto the next challenge.

If you have a difficult job to be done within a defined timetable and you do not have the resources in-house you should consider the value an Interim Manager can bring both to yourself and your organisation. Gaze into the post-recession future and see what tough jobs need to be done now to ensure you are ahead of the game.

Interim Management User's Guide

 

Image credit : CELALTEBER

Tagss: Interim Management, Mergers & Acquisitions, Dave Jordan, CEE, Logistics Management